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Includes sound generation, transmission, and attenua-

tion.

For noise pollution see 45 Environment Pollution.

AND SPACE POLICY

N.A.

Includes NASA appropriation hearings; aviation law;
space law and policy; international law; international coop-
eration; and patent policy.

74 OPTICS

3069

SPACE SCIENCES

Includes light phenomena and optical devices.

For lasers see 36 Lasers and Masers.

Includes space sciences (general); astronomy; as-

trophysics; lunar and planetary exploration; solar physics;

75 PLASMA PHYSICS

3071

and space radiation.

Includes magnetohydrodynamics and plasma fusion.

For related information see also Geosciences.

For ionospheric plasmas see 46 Geophysics. For

88 SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL)

N.A.

space plasmas see 90 Astrophysics.

76 SOLID-STATE PHYSICS

3077

89 ASTRONOMY

3086

Includes superconductivity.

Includes radio, gamma-ray, and infrared astronomy;

For related information see also 33 Electronics and

and astrometry.

Electrical Engineering and 36 Lasers and Masers.

90 ASTROPHYSICS

3087

NI THERMODYNAMICS AND

Includes cosmology; celestial mechanics; space plas-

STATISTICAL PHYSICS

3082

mas; and interstellar and interplanetary gases and dust.

For related information see also 75 Plasma Physics.

Includes quantum mechanics; theoretical physics; and

Bose and Fermi statistics.

For related information see also 25 Inorganic and Phys-

91 LUNAR AND PLANETARY

EXPLORATION

3088

ical Chemistry and 34 Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.

Includes planetology; and manned and unmanned

flights.

SOCIAL SCIENCES

For spacecraft design or space stations see 18 Space-

Includes social sciences (general); administration and

craft Design, Testing and Performance.

management; documentation and information science;

economics and cost analysis; law, political science, and

92 SOLAR PHYSICS

3089

space policy; and urban technology and transportation.

Includes solar activity, solar flares, solar radiation and

sunspots.

80 SOCIAL SCIENCES (GENERAL)

N.A.

For related information see 93 Space Radiation.

Includes educational matters.

93 SPACE RADIATION

3090

81 ADMINISTRATION AND

Includes cosmic radiation; and inner and outer earth's

MANAGEMENT

3083

radiation belts.

Includes management planning and research.

For biological effects of radiation see 52 Aerospace

Medicine. For theory see 73 Nuclear and High-Energy

82 DOCUMENTATION AND

Physics.

INFORMATION SCIENCE

3084

Includes information management; information stor-

GENERAL

age and retrieval technology; technical writing; graphic

arts, and micrography.

Includes aeronautical, astronautical, and space sci-

For computer documentation see 61 Computer Pro-

ence related histories, biographies, and pertinent reports

gramming and Software.

too broad for categorization; histories or broad overviews

of NASA programs.

83 ECONOMICS AND COST ANALYSIS

N.A.

Includes cost effectiveness studies.

99 GENERAL

N.A.

Note: N.A. means that no abstracts were assigned to this category for this issue.

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205 p

CONTRACT OR GRANT
REPORT NUMBERS

PRICE CODE

AVAILABILITY SOURCE
COSATI CODE

(Contract NAS9-17560)
(NASA-CR-172095; R-2088; NAS 1.26:172095) Avail: NTIS HC
A10/MF A01 CSCL 22B

The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment
(COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment,
but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a
gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted
in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system
could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The
dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with
the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal
pointing control system has been studied using analysis and
simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed
for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments.
Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also
simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier
jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers
was included. Control system stability and performance and loads
on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated.
The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the
Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna
system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets. Author

xii

ADM

NATIONAL

STRATON

VOLUME 27 NUMBER 21 / NOVEMBER 8, 1989

Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports

A Semimonthly Publication of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

01 AERONAUTICS (GENERAL)

Actual production costs are compared with estimated production costs predicted from the models to create measure of cost overruns and cost underruns. A set of factors that are associated with instances of cost over/underruns are identified. These factors reflect aspects of the aircraft program, the political and economic environment at the time of commencement of production on the aircraft program, and the financial condition of the prime contractor.

GRA

71 p

02 AERODYNAMICS

Includes aerodynamics of bodies, combinations, wings, rotors, and control surfaces; and internal flow ducts and turbomachinery

For related information see also 34 Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.

N89-26807# Air Force Systems Command, Wright-Patterson AFB, OH. Foreign Technology Div. ACTA AERONAUTICA ET ASTRONAUTICA SINICA, VOLUME 8, NUMBER 12, DECEMBER 1987 (SELECTED ARTICLES) 15 Feb. 1989

Transl. into ENGLISH from Hangkong Xuebao (Peoples Republic of China), v. 8, no. 12, Dec. 1987 p 8557-8562, 8585-8593, and 8601-8610 (AD-A206782; FTD-ID(RS)T-0942-88) Avail: NTIS HC A04/MF A01 CSCL 01/2

Aircraft take off and landing gear are studied in order to understand nose wheel shimmy and provide measures to prevent it. It also deals with an analysis of runway dynamics and other such similar areas as nose wheel operation. Semi-Prepared Airfield and Design of Double-Action Shock Absorber: Airfields, in wars of the future, most necessarily suffer damage. To satisfy the peculiar demands of using this type of airfield, the design concepts of double action or double gas chamber shock shock absorbers. Moreover, as concerns their static and dynamic characteristics as well as the main parameters in the principles for their selection, it makes a relatively detailed comparative analysis. The settlement on standards for the unevenness of airfield runways, is based on the concept of power spectra. It introduces basic methods for measuring random variables from the unevenness of airfield runways. It drafts curves for the power spectra of uneven runways and carries out a preliminary analysis of the dynamic effects in aircraft ground surface taxing.

GRA

N89-26810*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA.
WIND-TUNNEL INVESTIGATION OF AERODYNAMIC
CHARACTERISTICS AND WING PRESSURE DISTRIBUTIONS
OF AN AIRPLANE WITH VARIABLE-SWEEP WINGS MODIFIED
FOR LAMINAR FLOW
James B. Hallissy and Pamela S. Phillips Washington Aug.
1989 222 p
(NASA-TM-4124; L-16493; NAS 1.15:4124) Avail: NTIS HC
A10/MF A01 CSCL 01A

A wind tunnel test was conducted to evaluate the aerodynamic characteristics and wing pressure distributions of a variable wing sweep aircraft having wing panels that are modified to promote laminar flow. The modified wing section shapes were incorporated over most of the exposed outer wing panel span and were obtained by extending the leading edge and adding thickness to the existing wing upper surface forward of 60 percent chord. Two different wing configurations, one each for Mach numbers 0.7 and 0.8, were tested on the model simultaneously, with one wing configuration on the left side and the other on the right. The tests were conducted at Mach numbers 0.20 to 0.90 for wing sweep angles of 20, 25, 30, and 35 degrees. Longitudinal, lateral and directional aerodynamic characteristics of the modified and baseline configurations, and selected pressure distributions for the modified configurations, are presented in graphical form without analysis. A tabulation of the pressure data for the modified configuration is available as microfiche.

Author

N89-26808* # National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, CA.
SENSOR DEVELOPMENT PROGRAMS AT NASA AMES
RESEARCH CENTER
Y.-C. Cho Aug. 1989

Presented at the International
Society for Optical Engineering's 1989 Technical Symposia on
Aerospace Sensing, Orlando, FL, 27-31 Mar. 1989
(NASA-TM-102217; A-89167; NAS 1.15:102217) Avail: NTIS
HC A02/MF A01 CSCL 01B

Two sensor development programs being conducted at the Fluid Mechanics Laboratory, NASA Ames Research Center are described, one in progress and the other being initiated. The ongoing program involves digital image velocimetry for velocity field measurements of time-dependent flows. The new program involves advanced acoustic sensors for wind tunnel applications.

Author

8 p

N89-26809# Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, CA. Dept.
of Administrative Sciences.
ESTIMATING AND EXPLAINING THE PRODUCTION COST OF
HIGH-TECHNOLOGY SYSTEMS: THE CASE OF MILITARY
AIRCRAFT
O. Douglas Moses 17 May 1989 85 p
(AD-A208391; NPS54-89-07) Avail: NTIS HC A05/MF A01
CSCL 01/3

This study tests relationships between measures of the state-of-the-art of technology and advances in technology with production cost. The analysis is conducted using a sample of military aircraft. Parametric cost estimating models are developed.

N89-26811*# National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA.
A PROCEDURE FOR COMPUTING SURFACE WAVE
TRAJECTORIES ON AN INHOMOGENEOUS SURFACE
Raymond L. Barger Washington Aug. 1989 14 p
(NASA-TP-2929; L-16558; NAS 1.60:2929) Avail: NTIS HC
A03/MF A01 CSCL 01A

Equations are derived for computing surface waves on smooth surfaces, including surfaces with a nonuniform wave speed. The prior literature dealt primarily with the theoretical development with little consideration given to computational methods, and examples were limited to waves on surfaces of simple analytic description, such as cones, spheres, and cylinders. The computational procedure presented is a relatively general method. Sample

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