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Includes sound generation, transmission, and attenua

tion.

AND SPACE POLICY

3373 Includes NASA appropriation hearings; aviation law; space law and policy; international law; international cooperation; and patent policy.

For noise pollution see 45 Environment Pollution.

72 ATOMIC AND MOLECULAR PHYSICS 3355

Includes atomic structure, electron properties, and molecular spectra.

73 NUCLEAR AND HIGH-ENERGY PHYSICS

3358 Includes elementary and nuclear particles; and reactor theory.

For space radiation see 93 Space Radiation.

85 URBAN TECHNOLOGY AND
TRANSPORTATION

3374 Includes applications of space technology to urban problems; technology transfer; technology assessment; and surface and mass transportation.

For related information see 03 Air Transportation and Safety, 16 Space Transportation, and 44 Energy Production and Conversion.

74 OPTICS

3359

SPACE SCIENCES
Includes light phenomena and optical devices.
For lasers see 36 Lasers and Masers.

Includes space sciences (general); astronomy; as

trophysics; lunar and planetary exploration; solar physics; 75 PLASMA PHYSICS

3361

and space radiation.

For related information see also Geosciences. Includes magnetohydrodynamics and plasma fusion. For ionospheric plasmas see 46 Geophysics. For

88 SPACE SCIENCES (GENERAL)

3374 space plasmas see 90 Astrophysics.

89 ASTRONOMY

3374 76 SOLID-STATE PHYSICS

3364 Includes superconductivity.

Includes radio, gamma-ray, and infrared astronomy; For related information see also 33 Electronics and

and astrometry. Electrical Engineering and 36 Lasers and Masers.

90 ASTROPHYSICS

3375 TI THERMODYNAMICS AND

Includes cosmology; celestial mechanics; space plasSTATISTICAL PHYSICS

3370

mas; and interstellar and interplanetary gases and dust.

For related information see also 75 Plasma Physics. Includes quantum mechanics; theoretical physics; and Bose and Fermi statistics.

91 LUNAR AND PLANETARY For related information see also 25 Inorganic and Phys

EXPLORATION

3377 ical Chemistry and 34 Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.

Includes planetology; and manned and unmanned

flights. SOCIAL SCIENCES

For spacecraft design or space stations see 18 SpaceIncludes social sciences (general); administration and

craft Design, Testing and Performance. management; documentation and information science; economics and cost analysis; law, political science, and

92 SOLAR PHYSICS

3377 space policy; and urban technology and transportation.

Includes solar activity, solar flares, solar radiation and

sunspots. 80 SOCIAL SCIENCES (GENERAL)

N.A.

For related information see 93 Space Radiation. Includes educational matters.

93 SPACE RADIATION

3377 81 ADMINISTRATION AND

Includes cosmic radiation; and inner and outer earth's MANAGEMENT

3371

radiation belts. Includes management planning and research.

For biological effects of radiation see 52 Aerospace

Medicine. For theory see 73 Nuclear and High-Energy 82 DOCUMENTATION AND

Physics. INFORMATION SCIENCE

3372 Includes information management; information stor

GENERAL age and retrieval technology; technical writing; graphic arts; and micrography.

Includes aeronautical, astronautical, and space sciFor computer documentation see 61 Computer Pro

ence related histories, biographies, and pertinent reports gramming and Software.

too broad for categorization; histories or broad overviews

of NASA programs. 83 ECONOMICS AND COST ANALYSIS

N.A. Includes cost effectiveness studies.

99 GENERAL

3378 Note: N.A. means that no abstracts were assigned to this category for this issue.

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205 p

CONTRACT OR GRANT
REPORT NUMBERS

PRICE CODE

AVAILABILITY SOURCE
COSATI CODE

(Contract NAS9-17560)
(NASA-CR-172095; R-2088; NAS 1.26:172095) Avail: NTIS HC
A10/MF A01 CSCL 22B

The second Control Of Flexible Structures Flight Experiment
(COFS-2) includes a long mast as in the first flight experiment,
but with the Langley 15-m hoop column antenna attached via a
gimbal system to the top of the mast. The mast is to be mounted
in the Space Shuttle cargo bay. The servo-driven gimbal system
could be used to point the antenna relative to the mast. The
dynamic interaction of the Shuttle Orbiter/COFS-2 system with
the Orbiter on-orbit Flight Control System (FCS) and the gimbal
pointing control system has been studied using analysis and
simulation. The Orbiter pointing requirements have been assessed
for their impact on allowable free drift time for COFS experiments.
Three fixed antenna configurations were investigated. Also
simulated was Orbiter attitude control behavior with active vernier
jets during antenna slewing. The effect of experiment mast dampers
was included. Control system stability and performance and loads
on various portions of the COFS-2 structure were investigated.
The study indicates possible undesirable interaction between the
Orbiter FCS and the flexible, articulated COFS-2 mast/antenna
system, even when restricted to vernier reaction jets. Author

xii

NATIONAL

STRATION

U.S.A

VOLUME 27 NUMBER 23 / DECEMBER 8, 1989

Scientific and Technical Aerospace Reports

A Semimonthly Publication of the National Aeronautics and Space Administration

01 AERONAUTICS (GENERAL)

6 p

N89-28485# Deutsche Forschungs- und Versuchsanstalt fuer Luft- und Raumfahrt, Cologne (Germany, F.R.). (ACTIVITIES REPORT IN AEROSPACE RESEARCH IN GERMANY, F.R.) Annual Report, 1987 Sep. 1988 101 p in GERMAN Previously announced in IAA as A89-32775 Report contains color illustrations (ISSN-0070-3966; ETN-89-94382) Avail: NTIS HC A06/MF A01

The activities of the FRG aerospace research organization DFVLR for 1987 are reported. In the research field of aeronautics, investigations were performed on Compas (a planning and decision aid for air traffic controllers) and on a delta wing (a contribution to the International Vortex Flow Experiment). Space-related activities were the German Front Experiment 1987 (an example for the mesoscale probing of the atmosphere) and wind tunnel testing of reentry bodies in the hypersonic range. In the field of energy technology, renewable energy sources for BadenWuerttemberg were investigated. Photographs, drawings, and diagrams are provided, and an English summary is given for each section.

ESA

C. P. Butterfield Jun. 1989

Presented at the European Wind Energy Conference and Exhibition, Glasgow, Scotland, 10 Jul. 1989 (Contract DE-ACO2-83CH-10093) (DE89-009443; SERI/TP-217-3505; CONF-890717-2) Avail: NTIS HC A02/MF A01

The objective of this comprehensive research program was to study the effects of Horizontal Axis Wind Turbine (HAWT) blade rotation on aerodynamic behavior below, near, and beyond stall. The flow angle sensor used to measure Angle Of Attack (AOA) is described along with how the sensor was calibrated, and results are given of pressure integrations on the blade. Aerodynamic, load, flow visualization, and inflow measurements were made on a 10-m, three-bladed, downwind HAWT. A video camera was mounted on the rotor to record video images of tufts attached to the low pressure side of a constant-chord, zero-twist blade. Load measurements were made using strain gages mounted every 10 percent of the blade's span. Pressure taps were located at 32 chordwise positions and revealed pressure distributions comparable with wind tunnel data. Inflow was measured using a vertical plane array of eight propvane and five triaxial (U-V-W) prop-type anemometers located 10 m upwind in the predominant wind direction. Results show evidence of stall hysteresis and unsteadiness at high AOA. Correlations with analytical predictions and wind tunnel tests show good agreement at low AOA and poor agreement at high AOA.

DOE

02 AERODYNAMICS

Includes aerodynamics of bodies, combinations, wings, rotors, and control surfaces; and internal flow in ducts and turbomachinery.

For related information see also 34 Fluid Mechanics and Heat Transfer.

N89-28486* National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
Langley Research Center, Hampton, VA.
LOW-SPEED STATIC AND DYNAMIC FORCE TESTS OF A
GENERIC SUPERSONIC CRUISE FIGHTER CONFIGURATION
David E. Hahne Washington Oct. 1989 35 p
(NASA-TM-4138; L-16599; NAS 1.15:4138) Avail: NTIS HC
A03/MF A01 CSCL 01A

Static and dynamic force tests of a generic fighter configuration designed for sustained supersonic flight were conducted in the Langley 30- by 60-foot tunnel. The baseline configuration had a 65 deg arrow wing, twin wing mounted vertical tails and a canard. Results showed that control was available up to C sub L,max (maximum lift coefficient) from aerodynamic controls about all axes but control in the pitch and yaw axes decreased rapidly in the post-stall angle-of-attack region. The baseline configuration showed stable lateral-directional characteristics at low angles of attack but directional stability occurred near alpha 25 deg as the wing shielded the vertical tails. The configuration showed positive effective dihedral throughout the test angle-of-attack range. Forced oscillation tests indicated that the baseline configuration had stable damping characteristics about the lateral-directional axes. Author

N89-28488# General Dynamics Corp., Fort Worth, TX. SMALL SCALE MODEL TESTS IN SMALL WIND AND WATER TUNNELS AT HIGH INCIDENCE AND PITCH RATES. VOLUME 1: TEST PROGRAM AND DISCUSSION OF RESULTS Final Report, Sep. 1985 - Sep. 1988 Atlee M. Cunningham, Jr., Todd Bushlow, John R. Mercer, Tim A. Wilson, and Steve N. Schwoerke Apr. 1989 144 p (Contract N00014-85-C-0419) (AD-A208647) Avail: NTIS HC A07/MF A01 CSCL 01/1

Volume 1 presents the test program, correlations with other data, and discussions of the specific objectives of this investigation. in general it was shown that the small scale wind tunnel and water tunnel test techniques do provide reasonable dynamic force and moment data for a wide variety of planforms and conditions. The force testing of small-scale models in either a small wind tunnel or a water tunnel was investigated as an inexpensive and quick means to obtain meaningful dynamic force and moment data representative of rapidly maneuvering full-scale aircraft. Force tests of flat-plate semi-span models were conducted in the General Dynamics Aerodynamic Development Facility (ADF) which is a small 14x14 in. low speed wind tunnel. Oscillatory model motions up to 48 deg (peak to peak) amplitude were tested at frequencies of 1 to 3 Hz. Force tests of flat and three-dimensional full span models were conducted in the General Dynamics Hydroflow Facility (HFF) which is a horizontal flow water tunnel with a 24x24 in. test section. Pitch/pulse model motions were tested for conditions similar to those tested in the ADF.

GRA

N89-28487# Midwest Research Inst., Golden, CO. Solar Energy
Research Inst.
THREE-DIMENSIONAL AIRFOIL PERFORMANCE
MEASUREMENTS ON A ROTATING WING

N89-28489# Aeronautical Research Labs., Melbourne
(Australia).
COMPARISON OF FLOW-VISUALISED VORTICES WITH
COMPUTED GEOMETRY OVER THIN DELTA WINGS

flow is not separated. It is also demonstrated that the present 3D code gives results in agreement with experimental data and it can be used for 3D flutter simulation programs in a similar manner to 2D programs.

Author

L. D. MacLaren Feb. 1989 6 p
(AD-A209083; ARL-FLIGHT-MECH-TM-409) Avail: NTIS HC
A02/MF A01 CSCL 01/1

The vortex flow patterns over thin delta wings were photographed during experiments in a vertical water tunnel making use of appropriate flow visualization techniques. The flow geometry for these wings was also calculated using the VORSBA vortex flow computer program. A comparison is made between the calculated and experimental results and discrepancies between them are discussed.

GRA

N89-28493*# California Polytechnic State Univ., San Luis
Obispo.
ANALYSIS OF LEADING EDGE SEPARATION USING A LOW
ORDER PANEL METHOD Final Report
Doral R. Sandlin Sep. 1989 26 p
(Contract NCC2-226)
(NASA-CR-185892; NAS 1.26:185892) Avail: NTIS HC
A03/MF A01

An examination of the potential flow computer code VSAERO to model leading edge separation over a delta wing is examined. Recent improvements to the code suggest that it may be capable of predicting pressure coefficients on the body. Investigation showed that although that code does predict the vortex roll-up, the pressure coefficients have significant error. The program is currently unsatisfactory, but with some additional development it may become a useful tool for this application.

Author

N89-28490# Air Force Inst. of Tech., Wright-Patterson AFB,
OH. School of Engineering.
GLIDER GROUND EFFECT INVESTIGATION M.S. Thesis
Nathan H. Jones May 1989 131 p
(AD-A209152; AFIT/GAE/ENY/89J-2) Avail: NTIS HC
A07/MF A01 CSCL 01/3

This research used glider flight tests and optimized glider simulations to evaluate the aerodynamics of ground effect and to determine the optimum flight profile for maximum gliding range in gliders. A series of 122 sorties were flown in the Grob G-103 Twin ll and the Let L-13 Blanik gliders on a specially designed very low altitude speed course. Radar tracking data were used to determine the glider position and velocity, and a 3 degree of freedom glider performance simulation was used to determine the glider parasite and induced drag coefficients in ground effect. Lifting line derived predictions of ground effect induced drag reduction developed by Dr. Sighard Hoerner were found to be accurate at altitudes above 20 percent wingspan but were up to 16 percent too optimistic at low altitudes. A revised prediction of ground effect induced drag reduction was developed based on the flight test data, and this revised prediction was used along with a turbulent boundary layer wind model in two optimization algorithms to develop the optimum flight profiles for maximum range gliding flight.

GRA

45 p

N89-28494# Institut Franco-Allemand de Recherches, Saint-Louis
(France)
STUDY OF THE WING-VORTEX INTERACTION IN THREE
DIMENSIONAL FLOWS (INCOMPRESSIBLE INVISCID FLOW)
(ETUDE DE L'INTERACTION AILE/TOURBILLON EN
TRIDIMENSIONNEL (ECOULEMENT INCOMPRESSIBLE SANS
VISCOSITE)]
M. Schaffar 16 Aug. 1987

In FRENCH Original contains color illustrations (ISL-R-123/87; ETN-89-94856) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01

The use of horseshoe vortices on the wing and of a turbulent network for the wake, permitted treatment in three dimensions of the case of a thin wing for steady flow and unsteady flow (incident wing with upstream vortex). For steady flow and large spans the calculated lift is close to the two dimensional value. For the unsteady case the variations in lift along the path of the vortex are described.

ESA

N89-28491# Air Force Geophysics Lab., Hanscom AFB, MA. THE FIRST LARGE BALLOON LAUNCH FROM ANTARCTICA Final Scientific Report John Ground, Kenneth Dallas, Ralph Cowie, and Willard F. Thorn 26 Sep. 1988 103 p (AD-A207735; AFGL-TR-88-0265; AFGL-ERP-1015) Avail: NTIS HC A06/MF A01 CSCL 01/3

This collection of five papers discusses the many practical problems, logistics, metrological planning, flight history and recovery operations for the first very large (11.6M cu ft) stratospheric balloon launched from Antarctica. The on-board Gamma Ray Advanced Detector (GRAD) was flown successfully to detect gamma ray emissions from Supernova 1987A. The 2500-1b payload was recovered from a 12,500-ft plateau by LC-130 aircraft. The instrumentation for command-control and telemetry, payload integration and testing, and the telemetry station installed aboard an LC-130 aircraft are described. An overview of the performance of the ARGOS satellite tracking and data-recovery system on this flight is included.

GRA

N89-28495# Institut Franco-Allemand de Recherches, Saint-Louis (France) PROFILE-VORTEX INTERACTIONS (INTERACTION PROFIL/TOURBILLON) J. Haertig, Ch. Johe, and M. Schaffar 3 Nov. 1987 49 p in FRENCH (Contract DRET-85-031) (ISL-R-125/87; ETN-89-94858) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01

The time evolution of the lift coefficient of a profile exposed to incident vortices is calculated by a perfect fluid two dimensional method and compared to experimental results obtained in a hydrodynamic channel. The unsteady turbulent field is analyzed using laser anemometry. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical model adopted, except for the case when the vortex path is too close to the profile.

ESA

N89-28492# National Aerospace Lab., Tokyo (Japan). Structural
Mechanics Div.
SOME COMPUTATIONS OF UNSTEADY NAVIER-STOKES
FLOW AROUND OSCILLATING AIRFOIL/WING
Jiro Nakamichi Oct. 1988 25 p
(NAL-TR-1004T; ISSN-0389-4010) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF
A01

Unsteady Navier-Stokes calculations around an airfoil/wing are demonstrated. 2D transonic flutter simulations are performed about the NACA 64A010 airfoil using not only a diagonal form of a Beam-Warming scheme but also a non-diagonal form. The effects of time accuracy of the algorithms on the flutter boundaries are checked by comparing two results. 3D unsteady computations around an oscillating wing in elastic motions are also carried out and the obtained results are compared with experimental data. It is found that the diagonal form of a Beam-Warming scheme is efficient in predicting the flutter boundaries of airfoils where the

N89-28496# National Aeronautical Lab., Bangalore (India).
Computational and Theoretical Fluid Dynamics Div.
ROLE OF SUPERCOMPUTER IN COMPUTATIONAL
AERODYNAMICS
N. R. Subramanian and Anand Kumar Jun. 1989 20 p
(PD-CF-8925) Avail: NTIS HC A03/MF A01

An overview is given of the computational requirement for solving CFD problems. Also described are two examples, typical of two different types of approximation of Navier-Stokes equations, carried out on a Supercomputer. The first problem deals with the full potential transonic flow computations around a wing in a body fitted coordinate system, while the second deals with vortex flow computation on a low aspect ratio wing based on Euler equations using finite volume and Runge-Kutta time stepping approaches.

Author

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