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CONGRESS,

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BRUNSWICK, GA.

JANUARY 16, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. WILLIAMS, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted

the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 21197.)

Your committee having had under consideration the foregoing bill recommend that the same be passed without amendment. The port of Brunswick, Ga., is growing in importance as a distributing point and is entitled to all the advantages of similar ports in the matter of the prompt forwarding of dutiable goods there received. Practically all of the ports above and below Brunswick on the south Atlantic coast now enjoy the privilege of immediate transportation of dutiable goods, and your committee knows of no reason why Brunswick should not enjoy a like privilege. According to the report of the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army, the total value of all freight received and shipped at the port of Brunswick during 1905 was $13,832,200, being an increase of almost $14,000,000 over the preceding year. These figures are cited as showing the growing importance of the port. Of the commerce handled in 1905, about $12,000,000 of the same consisted of imports.

Recent railway development and the putting into actual operation this month of a steamship line between Brunswick, Ga., and Habana, Cuba, renders it very desirable that Brunswick be made a port for the immediate transportation of dutiable goods; for the prompt handling of imports from Cuba, bound for the city of Atlanta, Ga., and other inland ports through the port of Brunswick requires that there should be as little detention as possible at the port of Brunswick.

The Secretary of the Treasury has advised your committee that there is no objection to the passage of the bill.

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CONGRESS

No.

BRUNSWICK, GA.

.

JANUARY 16, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. WILLIAMS, from the Committee on Ways and Means, submitted

the following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 21197.)

Your committee having had under consideration the foregoing bill recommend that the same be passed without amendment. The port of Brunswick, Ga., is growing in importance as a distributing point and is entitled to all the advantages of similar ports in the matter of the prompt forwarding of dutiable goods there received. Practically all of the ports above and below Brunswick on the south Atlantic coast now enjoy the privilege of immediate transportation of dutiable goods, and your committee knows of no reason why Brunswick should not enjoy a like privilege. According to the report of the Chief of Engineers of the United States Army, the total value of all freight received and shipped at the port of Brunswick during 1905 was $13,832,200, being an increase of almost $14,000,000 over the preceding year. These figures are cited as showing the growing importance of the port. Of the commerce handled in 1905, about $12,000,000 of the same consisted of imports.

Recent railway development and the putting into actual operation this month of a steamship line between Brunswick, Ga., and Habana, Cuba, renders it very desirable that Brunswick be made a port for the immediate transportation of dutiable goods; for the prompt handling of imports from Cuba, bound for the city of Atlanta, Ga., and other inland ports through the port of Brunswick requires that there should be as little detention as possible at the port of Brunswick.

The Secretary of the Treasury has advised your committee that there is no objection to the passage of the bill.

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CONGRESS

INVESTIGATION OF WATER RESOURCES IN THE UNITED

STATES.

JANUARY 16, 1907.-Referred to the House Calendar and ordered to be printed.

Mr. Brown, from the Committee on Mines and Mining, submitted the

following

REPORT.

[To accompany H. R. 23583.]

The Committee on Mines and Mining, to whom was referred the House bill 23583, having had the same under consideration, report it back with the recommendation that it pass.

The provisions of this bill do not confer upon the Geological Survey any new powers, nor do they provide for new fields of investigation nor enlarge or expand any of those now authorized by existing legislation. Their effect, if enacted, will be to insure consideration upon the part of Congress of the character of the work and the advisability of its maintenance, so that the investigations may stand or fall, according to their own merits, and to impart to the Members of Congress, as well as all other interested persons, an accurate idea of the scope and purposes of the investigations, which are now poorly defined and obscured by the act at present in force--in other words, to make the act define itself.

With reference to the first point, the authority of the Geological Survey to investigate water resources is conferred in a clause of successive sundry civil bills, as follows:

For gauging the streams and determining the water supply of the United States and for the investigation of underground currents and artesian wells and the preparation of reports upon the best methods of utilizing the water resources, dollars.

During the consideration of the sundry civil bill in the Committee of the Whole House on June 13, 1906, a point of order was made against the above appropriation on the ground that it changes existing law and that there is no authority in law for the provision. (Congressional Record, vol. 40, No. 9, p. 3415.)

The existing law referred to in the point of order is the organic law of the Geological Survey, as follows:

For the salary of the Director of the Geological Survey, which office is hereby established under the Interior Department, who shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate, six thousand dollars: Pro

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