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&c by surcharging it with vapor, or dust, ple stove, (Dr. Noti's, I believe,) placed in score if your pipe is long enough, and your gases, or any thing else objectionable ;-ex. | a fire-proof closet about four feet square, | fire hot enough. I have been told that Mr. cept that in the case of heating by steam, I with a door of sufficient size to admit a Perkins says he can heat a whole parish have read a statement that it sometimes person, in the top of which were perfora. I from one fire. causes an unpleasint olor; (wing, prob- tions, through which the heared as passed ably to the particular metal of which the to the rooms above.

From the Mechavics' Magazine. pipes are made; for the complaint is not As to the original cost of hot water and

STEAM, ver sus WATER. applied generally to this method.

steam apparatus, and the quantity of heat Few persons even in this age of inquiry So much for the quality of the heat ob-in surface necessary in each, I am no end improvemeni scem to be aware of the tained by these different methods :-I will able to say much. li is stated in ile " En vast superiority of steam over every other now state what little I know of its cost.cyclopedia Americana” that one square form of motive power. Many are sull, by An obvious advantage of furnaces, stoves, foot of steam-pipe has been found suflicient | chis assertion, reminded of the anecdote of etc., is, that if they are well constructed, to heat two hundred cubic feet of air; but the famous Brindley. In giving evidence you may burn in them almost any kind or this may have been for the English climate. | before a Committee of the House of Comquality of fuel, and thereby save the differ-In Perkins' hot water, called the “high mons on the subject of Canals, he spoke of ence between the cheapest and dearest, (sup-pressure” apparatus, rolled iron pipes are their superiority as a mode of communicaposing, of course, that they are not in your used, hermetically sealed, so that the watertion in such decided terms, that a member parlers, or exposed 10 view.) Another ad- is confined and beated 10 350° or higher,- || asked for what he thought rivers were invantage is, that you may dispense with the consequently much less pipe is required tended? he unhesitatingly replied, “ to feed incumbrance of chimnies, and a great deal of than in those where they are kept at 212°, canals.” Now, though we say that the expensive ordamental work,amounting, I amor a very little over. In London these iron manufacturer will one day “feed his boiler told, 10 a thousand dollars in many bouses.pipes are frequently used for gas, instead of from the falls,” we think that the asserito

to the comparative cheapness in lead, which auswers the purpose quite well;| is not a bold one, and that it does admii of respect to fuel of “ hot air," "sieam,” and so I presume their cost cannot much exceedproof. “ hot water,”'I can only mention a fact re-lihat of lead pipe. One greai advantage of Some time ago, our aitention was directported in the London Journal of Aris and this “high pressure" method is, that all|ed to a comparison of the expense of ibe Sciences: that in one case, where hot water your boiling may be done without the cost two forms of power in the village of Lowwas introduced into a house that had pre- and diri of an extra fire, and in wooden or|ell, possessed of the best water power in viously been heated by hui air, the saving any other vessels, simply by projecting the the Union. The expense of Siean to Waof fuel was one third ; but this was not pipe from the wall a fost or so, bending inter was said to be as 100 to 125. considered a fair test, as the air-furnace | downwards, and making a coil, and return. We have since ofte: bad ibis subject in had not been well constructed.

ing it upwards and back to the wall. The mind, in reference 10 the more improved At this moment, while I am writing, I high temperature of the water circulating use of steam, and particularly to the econhave a smoke coming from an air-furnace within the pipe, will casue that in acy ves-lomy of the rotary engine of Avery. flue in the corner of my room; by which I sel placed under it to boil rapidly. It is Pursuing the comparison, we have colam prompted to censure the quackery of hard!y necessary to state that the pipe, after lected some of the more prominent disadthe unscientific persons who make these running and coiling in the partitions of the vaniages of the usual lıydraulic system, and things in such a way that they get filled rooms to be heated, returns into itselt'some-thecorresponding advantage of steam power. with dirt, and do not give you a chance 10what below the level of the fire; so thai The first item of cost is that of the water clean them, or renove the oxidiscd pipe, the water which has given off pari of its right, over and above the value of the ground

without pulling down a great quantiy of heat, being denser than that which has buias increased by any other advantages of lo. ... brick-work. The one I have, though eco-ljust passed through the fire, gravitates with || cality. This expense is in no case irifling,

nomical in respect to fuel, is a nuisance in greater power, and forces up the other, and and sometimes is positively enormous. all other respects, and was still worse be- / bus keeps up a constani circulation. Your There is of course no corresponding item fore I made a better arrangement of the correspondent will find these various meth- of expenditure in the use of steam, an ensmoke-pipe, which the stupid constructor ods detailed at length, in those volumes of gine working as well on the top of a hill had run, after an ascent of two and a halil the London Mechanics' Magazine, and the as in the bottom of a valley. feet, horizontally, for eighteen feet, to its London Journal of Arts and Sciences, pub

2d. The ouuay upon wheels, dams, and insertion into the kitchen chimney, the lished since 1827, which volumes he may other hydraulic works. This is often much large fire-place of which was opeo in:nedi- get from Francis' Library, under Peale's greater than would be necessary for the ately under it. Though I consider it for the Museum.

average pressure, provided it were constant general good, and therefore for every man's It may be well to mention that Mr. Per-11-1hat is, we are 10 erect works to support particular interest, to be rather genıle in kins is an American, and perhaps bas a pa-| much more water than we have supplied censuring the well intended blunders of tent right in this country. There are other through three quarters of the year. Freshhalf-ingenious, and wholly unlearned men, modifications of the hot water principle in-ets, &c. are to be provided against, at an inyet the number of inese nuisances, so ex-vented by Englishmen, and therefore not|creased cost. It is well known that in some pensive at first, and so liable 10 get out of patented here, and which the laws of honor || locations the provision for such contingenorder, and so difficult to repair, is so rapidly will allow us to use freely, so long as thecies is no small portion of the whole capi. increasing, that I feel bourd to give my legal enactments restricting commerce intal employed. feeble evidence against all that I have ever the products of genius and industry in the It is this expense, other things being seen of them. The fundamental principle'wo countries are allowed to remain in equal, that is to be compared with the cost on which they are made, is good; but in force.

of an engine, and the comparison is favoratheir construction all simplicity is eschew

Your obt. cervi.,

ble to the latter. ed, as if complication and multitude of parts

J. K. F.

3d. After every precaution, damages from were a proof of genius, and not strong pre

New-York, June 4, 1836.

floods are of constant occurrence, and their sumplive evidence of the want of it.

The

Note. I had almost forgotten the ques. | repair is exceedingly costly. only arrangement on this principle that I whether the heat from water pipes is suffi. 4th, The delay caused by freshets, &c., remember to have seen, that is free from cient for the coldest weather in our win. producing a stoppage from the too great the objection, isi enumerated, was a sim- ters? There will be no difficulty on that supply of power.

this item of cost-and he does not yet apo be equal in beauty of operation to the valu. I ler, to be applied to corn in the hill.

5th. The delay in seasons of drought, (The exhaust steam pipe of this engine when the supply is insufficient. is over 300 feet long.)

AGRICULTURE, &c. These last are most vexatious occurren. One of the greatest advantages of steam ces, preventing work often times when power, in many cases, is, that it admits of

From the Genosee Farmer. most is to be done, aod the uncertainty ari-change of locality, without injury 10 the BRIEF HINTS FOR SPRING WORK.-Apply sing from the possibility of such delays and machinery, and often with beneilt 10 the manure to corn and potato crops, and not accidents, is a cousiant care to the mana-employer.

to grain crops. ger of such an establishment, whereas 10 In this respect again Avery's Engine

Let manure be buried as soon as possible

after spreading. the consumer of steam, the perfect certain.slands pre-eminent. The machinery is

When rotted or fermented manure is apty of the amouni and regularity of the sup- beautifully compact, and consequently por-plied, let it be as thoroughly mixed with the ply of power is a great auxiliary in conduc- table.

An engine of 15 horse power is soil as possible. ting business. hardly a Icad for a horse, the whole weigh- should be pressed in aguin by passing a

Wheat thrown out of the ground by frost, For a steam engine, the only use of wa- ing less than 600 pounds.

roller over it. ter is a sufficiency for the boiler; and in Let us suppose, that a man purchases a

Ploughing heavy soils when wet, does these days of economy of heat and steam, a piece of timber land, of prime quality, but more injury than if the team were standing very small quantity of fuel is used, and but unfortunately (as is thought) away from idle. livile water. We have seen a rotary en- any water course.

In ploughing green sward deeply, the fur.

rows must always be at least one half wider gine, estimated at 15 horse power, evapora

Let him procure an Avery's Engine; and than deep, else the sods will not turn well. ting but 40 gallons per hour.

this, connected with his sa w mill, can be New meadows should now be rolled. 6th, Delay in winter, and in our yncer- placed upon wheels and moved, by the en All grain fields seeded to grass sbould be

rolled. tain climate this njay sometimes be consid- Igine itself, if he pleases, to any part of his erable, and in an establishment of great exland. (Mills capable of such an arrange-ble, upon a light and moderately moist soil,

Barley should be sown as early as possi. tent perhaps fatal.

ment, and very compact, are now easily to at the rate of one and a half to two bushels To balance all these expenses, peculiar to be procured.)

per acre, according to the size of the seed. Let him locate bis mill near a spring, and

A roller should be passed over it as soon 10 the use of hydraulic power, there is, as

as it is harrowed, to press the soil arouud it, far as we can recollect, but one peculiar to

commence operations. The waste and rub-land smooth the field. that of steam, namely, fuel. Now in saw

bish, that in most cases is a drug, is en Barley seed may be freed from intermixed mills this expense is nothing, and in all in irely consumed by the engine; the ground oats by pouring water upon it, when the oats siances much less than formerly.

is cleared, and nothing is to be removed but will float, and be skimmed of.
the perfectly formed timber.

Oais require strong rich soil, good cul. Our persevering countryman, Dr. Not.

ture, and early sowing. has already succeeded in greatly reducing

Among other useful applications of such Preserved leached and unleached ashes an engine, in the forest itself, no one can

which have accumulated during the winpear to be satisfied.

To corn touched by crows, As regards fuel, Avery's Engine has im-lable stave machine of Philip Cornell, N. Y. stir the seed with a sufficient quantity of

(A drawing and description of this ma-heated tar, and then roll it in plaster, lime mense advantages over cihers, inasmuch as chine will be found upon the next page.)

or ashes. the quantity of water used is less than in This machine promises to be of great ser.

Plaster is always most efficacious on any other case. The elasticity of the stean

| light and thin soil-on meadow and clover operates more Fail vantageously ilan in any of the saw mill above mentioned, nearly if vice. With such an arrangement as that ground, the earlier it is sown the better.

Plaster when applied to cultivated ground, other construction, the small quantity of water used being a proof of this.

not quite double the usual number of staves is hest when worked into the soil.
can be cut from the timber before transpor. after it is up, has increased the crop 25 per

Sowing it broadcast upon Indian corn In the engine above referred to, the cost foration, and these are already dressed and cent. coal was rather less than $1 for ten hours.

ready for use, either for liquids or solids. It is almost needless to observe that, iu

Every farmer should attempt the field cul.

These are only a few of the very many ture of root crops-he may raise as much many large establishments, manufacturies. I useful applications of this sort of traveling cattle food from one acre, as from &c., the appl cation of a portion of the machines. Others will suggest themselves

of meadow. steam to healing, &c., nearly, if not quite, to our readers.

Farmiers who have heavy rich soil, will compensales the cost of fuel. The certain.

succeed best with mangel wurtzel-o-those

It must be very evident that, whatever who have sandy soil, with ruta baga. 'They ty and uniformity of this method of drying goods, have fully established its superiority. I brings into use property of little or no value, should try both.

Sow garden crops in drilis where pracIndeed, in the art of dyeing, ceriain colors enabling the produce of such land 10 comowe their brilliancy to the rapid and high pere successfully with that of much better, ticable, in order that the weeds may bo

cleared with a hoe. heat of steam, and they could be produced must add to the wealth of the landholder,

Different varieties of melons and squashes in no other way. While speaking of this or timber merchant, a sum equal to the cost should be planted at the greatest possible of the best land.

distance, use of steam, we must notice an engine

rder to prevent intermixing

and crossing. erected in the Astor HOTEL. This is a Thus a greater uniformity of value would

Loosen the soil with a spade round fruit small engine of 5 horse power; its use is 10 result, and of consequence a more equal

trees growing in grass land. pump water from the different cisterns 10 competency to those on or away

Examine the roots of peach trees and re. all parts of the house-supply the baths water courses and canals.

move all the grubs. Their presence is with hot and cold water-clean knives Our object is to draw attention to this shown by the gum oozing out. brush shoes-roast and grind coffee ; and question, and we should be much gratified The last Albany Cultivator says—"Mr. the steam cooks the various dishes in the lif any of our friends would furnish us with Asa Carter, of Champion, Jefferson Co., kitchen, and also dries the clothes, which such information on the subject as they|tured by his daughter, who never saw a silk

has shown us a specimen of silk manufac. by this method of proceeding are ready for may have at their command.

worm, nor a silk reel, till last summer. use with unprecedented despatch.

This information from various quarters. This is a pretty good evidence that there is To these and numberless other uses is when collected, might furnish results equal

no great art or mystery in managing silk

worms." this engine turned, saving an immense num. ly useful and interesting-and we shall feel

One pound of potash dissolved in two ber of servants, a great quantity of fuel, and most happy in becoming the medium oflquarts of water and applied to trees, will a vast deal of time.

their communication to the public. effectually destroy the bark louse, &c.

acres

from great

EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

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EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

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EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

Date of the Experiment

and Designation of the Engine and its load.

Inclination

of the road.

Load of

the Velocityl Effective pressure in the engine in miles boiler in pounds per square reduce l per hour.inch, by the state of the lo a level.

Spring-balance.

Remarks.

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miles.

lbs. 16.38 20...23 27.25 1 The engine ascended the inclined 19.53 20...20.5 25 1

plane at without help.-Weather

calm 23.00 20...20.75 25.25 1

In this experiment, as in the former 16.08 20...20.75 = 25.25 1 one, the pressure was lowered on 7.50 45...47.5 = 51

1 purpose, 15.79 20...20.25 = 24.75 1

The engine was helped on the in15.00 50......

= 53 1 clined plane at or by two engines, 17.14 50...... :53 1 one with 11 in. cylinders, and the

other with 14 in. cylinders.-Weather 20.52 | 50......

53 1

fair and calm.-Water cold in the ten15.38 50...50.5 535

1 \der. 15.24 50...... :53 1

We have seen in the experiments on the friction of the engines, that

bat day, Atlas had a friction of 191 lbs. instead of 152 lbs.

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EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

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EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

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EXPERIMENTS ON THE VELOCITY AND LOAD OF THE ENGINES.

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The engine drew a part of its train 20...21.5 - 52 1

on the inelived plane at og The prel 20...22 53.25| 1 mainder was drawn by an additior ad 20...22 53.25 1 engine --Weather fair and calli,

Water lukewarm in the tender. 20...22.5 55 1

The delays that occurred in !! 20...21.5 52 I fjourney were ocɔasioned by several

trials made with the engine. 20...23.5 = = 58 1

Weather calm.-Water luke var in the tender. These eight wagui were part of the train of the form experiment.

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