Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub

constructed, fitted up, maintained, heated, and lighted by and at the expense of the railroad companies. (20 Stat. 358.)

This section superseded R. S. & 4005. See note under that section, post.

Provisions relating to the material, construction, and equipment of postoffice cars, were made by Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 1, post, $ 7503, and Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1, post, $ 7504.

Entering by violence a railway post-oflice car or any apartment in any railway car assigned to the use of the railway mail service, or willfully or maliciously assaulting a railway postal clerk while on duty, were made punishable by Act March 3, 1903, c. 1009, § 5, which was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 193 thereof, post, § 10363, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

In the postal service appropriation acts for recent fiscal years, the appropriations for railway post-office car service have been accompanied by provisos that no part thereof should be paid for the use of any car which was not sound in material and construction, and equipped with sanitary drinkingwater containers and toilet facilities, nor unless the car was regularly and thoroughly cleaned. The provisions for the fiscal year 1914 was by Act

March 4, 1913, c. 143, 37 Stat. 797. § 7497. (R. S. § 4003.) Refusal to provide postal cars.

In case any railroad-company now furnishing railway post-office cars shall refuse to provide such cars, such company shall not be entitled to any increase of compensation under the provisions of the next section.

Act March 3, 1873, c. 231, § 1, 17 Stat. 558.

Provisions reducing the compensation of railroads failing to furnish postoffice cars were made by Act March 1, 1881, c. 96, § 1, post, $ 7499.

(R. S. § 4004. Superseded.) This section fixed the rates of additional pay allowed for postal cars. It was superseded by a provision fixing different rates for the same service of Act

March 2, 1907, c. 2513, post, $ 7498. § 7498. (Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513.) Rates of additional pay for

postal cars. That after July first, nineteen hundred and seven, additional pay allowed for every line comprising a daily trip each way of railway post-office cars shall be at a rate not exceeding twenty-five dollars per mile per annum for cars forty feet in length, and twenty-seven dollars and fifty cents per mile per annum for forty-five-foot cars, and thirtytwo dollars and fifty cents per mile per annum for fifty-foot cars, and forty dollars per mile per annum for cars fifty-five feet or more in length. (34 Stat. 1212.)

This was a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1908, cited above.

It superseded R. S. $ 4004, which fixed different rates of pay for the same service. § 7499. (Act March 1, 1881, c. 96, § 1.) Railroads failing to furnish

post-office cars; penalty. Hereafter when any railroad company fail or refuse to provide railway post office cars when required by the Post-Office Department, or shall fail or refuse to provide suitable safety-heaters and safety-lamps therefor, with such number of saws and axes to each car for use in case of accident as may be required by the PostOffice Department, said company shall have its pay reduced ten per centum on the rates fixed in section four thousand and two of the Revised Statutes, as amended by act of July twelfth, eighteen hundred and seventy-six, entitled "An act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-seven, and for other purposes," and as further amended by the act of June seventeenth, eighteen hundred and seventy-eight, entitled “An act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and seventy-nine, and for other purposes.” (21 Stat. 375.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for the railway post-office service in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1882, cited above. R.

$ 4002, ante, 8 7483, mentioned in this section, fixed the rates of additional compensation for railroad mail transportation; and provisions of Act July 12, 1876, and Act June 17, 1878, also mentioned in this section, and set forth ante, 88 7484–7486, reduced such compensation.

This provision is more or less similar to a previous provision of Act June 11, 1880, c. 206, § 1, 21 Stat. 178, and which expressly repealed Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, 8 5, 20 Stat. 358, which authorized deductions in the compensation of railroads for mail transportation for failure to deliver the mail on schedule time, and which also authorized further deductions and the imposition of fines for other delinquencies.

Provisions for deductions in the compensation of contractors failing to perform the service according to contract were made by R. S. § 3962, ante, & 7450.

Provisions for deductions in the compensation of railroads failing to transport the mails on the fastest trains were made by Act July 5, 1884, c. 234, 8

1, post, $ 7500. $ 7500. (Act July 5, 1884, c. 234, § 1.) Failure of railroad com

panies to carry mails on fastest trains. If any railroad company shall fail or refuse to transport the mails, when required by the Post Office Department, upon the fastest train or trains run upon said road, said company shall have its pay reduced fifty per centum of the amount provided by law. (23 Stat. 156.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for inland mail transportation on railroad routes in the postal-service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1885, cited above.

Provisions for the reduction of the compensation of railroads failing to provide postal cars were made by Act March 1, 1881, c. 96, § 1, ante, $ 7499.

A provision for requiring railroads carrying mails to maintain their regular

train schedules, was made by Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513, post, $ 7501. § 7501. (Act March 2, 1907, c. 2513.) Railroads carrying mails to

maintain regular schedules as to time of arrival and departure;

fines for delay. The Postmaster-General shall require all railroads carrying the mails to maintain their regular train schedules as to time of arrival and departure of said mails, and it shall be his duty to impose and collect reasonable fines for delay when such delay is not caused by unavoidable accidents or conditions. (34 Stat. 1212.)

This was a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1908, cited above.

A provision somewhat similar, to require "all railroads carrying the mails under contract to comply with the terms of said contract, as to time of arrival and departure of said mails," was made by the similar appropriation act

for the preceding year, Act June 26, 1906, c. 3546, 34 Stat. 472. § 7502. (Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1.) Sending second-class mat

ter by freight restricted. From and after the passage of this Act the Post Office Department shall not extend or enlarge its present policy of sending second-class matter by freight trains. (37 Stat. 547.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for inland mail transportation by railroad routes in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1913, cited above.

(R. S. § 4005. Superseded.) This section provided that the length of cars for the post-office railwaycar service should be determined by the Post-Office Department, and required that all such cars should be properly fitted up, furnished, warmed, and lighted for the accommodation of the mail clerks. It was superseded by Act March

3, 1879, c. 180, § 4, ante, $ 7496. § 7503. (Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 1.) Post-office cars; ma

terial, construction, and equipment. After the first of July, nineteen hundred and eleven, no pay shall be allowed for the use of any wooden full railway post-office car unless constructed substantially in accordance with the most approved plans and specifications of the Post Office Department for such type of cars, nor for any wooden full railway post-office car run in any train between adjoining steel cars or between the engine and a steel car adjoining, and that hereafter additional cars accepted for this service shall be of steel, or with steel underframe, if used in a train in which a majority of the cars are of like construction: Provided further, That after the first of July, nineteen hundred and sixteen, the Postmaster General shall not approve or allow to be used or pay for any full railway post-office car not constructed of steel or with steel underframe, if such post-office car is used in a train in which a majority of the cars are of steel or of steel underframe construction. (36 Stat. 1335.)

These were provisions of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1912, cited above.

The Postmaster-General was authorized to pay for railway post-office cars necessarily used between July 1, 1911, and March 1, 1912, where reasonable , effort was being made by railroad companies to comply with the provisivas of this section, but the work could not be completed in time, by a provision of Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1, 37 Stat. 547.

Provisions requiring all full railway post-office cars approved or used after July 1, 1917, to be of steel or steel underframe or equally indestructible material, and requiring 25 per centum of other cars now in use to be replaced annually by steel cars, were made by Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1, post, &

7504. § 7504. (Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 1.) Steel railway post-office

cars required after July 1, 1917. After the first of July, nineteen hundred and seventeen, the Postmaster General shall not approve or allow to be used or pay for any full railway post-office car not constructed of steel or steel underframe or equally indestructible material, and not less than Comp.St.'13—210

(3345)

twenty-five per centum of the railway post-office cars of a railroad company not conforming to the provisions of this Act shall be replaced with cars constructed of steel annually after June, nineteen hundred and thirteen; and all cars accepted for this service and contracted for by the railroad companies after the passage of this Act shall be constructed of steel. (37 Stat. 547.)

This was a provision of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal

year 1913, cited above. § 7505. (Act March 1, 1899, c. 327, § 3.) Special transfer between

St. Louis and East St. Louis. That the Postmaster-General is hereby authorized, in his discretion, to pay from appropriations for transportation by railroad routes for the special transfer and terminal service between the Union Station at East Saint Louis, Illinois, and the Union Station at Saint Louis, Missouri; including the use, lighting, and heating of mail building and the transfer service at Saint Louis, at the rate of not exceeding fifty thousand dollars per annum, beginning on the first day of July, eighteen hundred and ninety-nine. (30 Stat. 965.)

Recent postal service appropriation acts have provided that no part of the appropriation for transportation by railroad routes should be paid for carrying the mail over the bridge across the Mississippi river at St. Louis, other than upon a mileage basis, but that the Postmaster-General might within the present law pay a reasonable price, not exceeding $33,000, for the special transfer and terminal service at East St. Louis and St. Louis. The provision for

the fiscal year 1914 was by Act March 4, 1913, c. 143, 37 Stat. 797. § 7506. (Act March 3, 1887, c. 346.) Mail messengers in connec

tion with railroad, etc., service. That the Postmaster-General be, and he is hereby, authorized to employ such mail-messenger service as may be necessary for the carriage of the mails in connection with railroad and steamboat service, transfer service between depots, over bridges or ferries, between post-offices, Post-offices and branch offices or stations, in cases where by the laws and regulations of the Post-Office Department, railroad companies, steamboat companies, and the masters of vessels are not required to deliver into and take from the post-offices the mails carried on their lines or vessels. (24 Stat. 492.)

This was an act entitled "An act authorizing the employment of mail-messengers in the postal service.”

Provisions for the classification and compensation of railway postal clerks were made by Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 7, post, 88 7509–7518.

Contracts, for not exceeding four years, for the steamboat and other equipment necessary for the Detroit River postal service, were authorized by a

provision of Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 1, ante, g 7262. § 7507. (Act Feb. 29, 1888, c. 18.) Additional division superin

tendents. That the Postmaster-General be, and is hereby, authorized to appoint and assign to duty two division superintendents of Railway Mail Service, in addition to those heretofore authorized, who shall each be paid a salary of two thousand five hundred dollars a year. (25 Stat. 43.)

This was an act entitled "An act authorizing the appointment of two additional division superintendents of Railway Mail Service."

The division superintendents referred to in this provision as "heretofore authorized" were provided for by Act June 17, 1878, c. 259, § 1, post, $ 7548. as "nine assistant superintendents of railway mail service, who may be detailed to act as superintendents of division of railway mail service, who shall each receive a salary of two thousand five hundred dollars per annum and no

more."

Officers in the railway mail service were provided for by appropriations in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1914, Act March 4, 1913, c. 143, 37 Stat. 797, as follows: Fifteen division superintendents, at $3,000 each; four assistant superintendents, at $2,200 each; fifteen assistant division superintendents, at $2,000 each; 112 chief clerks, at not exceeding $2,000 each; besides clerks of various classes. Appropriations were also made therein for traveling expenses of the various officers and clerk.

In the appropriations for the Post Office Department in the recent legislative, executive, and judicial appropriation acts, provision was made for a superintendent division of railway adjustments and an assistant superintendent division of railway adjustments, and, under the heading "Division of Railway Mail Service,” for a general superintendent, an assistant general superintendent, a chief clerk, and other clerks. The provision for the fiscal year 1914

was by Act March 4, 1913, c. 142, § 1, 37 Stat. 779. § 7508. (Act March 3, 1901, c. 851.) Assistant superintendents;

allowance for traveling expenses. Assistant superintendents may receive a per diem allowance in lieu of actual and necessary traveling expenses at the rate of four dollars per day while actually traveling on business of the Department away from their several designated headquarters. (31 Stat. 1105.)

This was a provision following an appropriation for per diem allowance of assistant superintendents in the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1902, cited above.

See notes to Act Feb. 29, 1888, c. 18, ante, $ 7507. Appropriations for the per diem allowance authorized by the provision of this act, and for necessary official expenses not covered thereby, were made in the subsequent postal service appropriation acts. The provision for the

fiscal year 1914 was by Act March 4, 1913, c. 143, 37 Stat. 798. § 7509. (Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, $ 7.) (1) Railway postal clerks;

appointment; number; classification and compensation. After September thirtieth, nineteen hundred and twelve, the Postmaster General may appoint railway postal clerks in such manner and of such respective grades and salaries as may be provided for in the annual appropriation acts for the service of the Post Office Department, for the purpose of sorting and distributing the mail in railway post offices, railway post-office terminals and transfer offices, and for service in the offices of division superintendents and chief clerks, and as transfer clerks and such other services as may pertain to the Railway Mail Service. Such clerks shall be designated as railway postal clerks and shall be divided into the following grades, with corresponding salaries per annum not exceeding the following rates:

Grade one, at not exceeding nine hundred dollars.
Grade two, at not exceeding one thousand dollars.

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »