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stricted to matter entitled to admission under laws requiring prepayment of postage, by a provision of Act June 26, 1906, C. 3546, post, $ 7382.

The definition of fourth-class mail matter in this section, and the provision limiting the weight of each package, in so far as it applied to fourthclass matter, were superseded by the provisions establishing the parcel post

system, Act Aug. 24, 1912, c. 389, § 8, (1-9), ante, 88 7319_7326. § 7331. (Act July 12, 1876, c. 179, $ 15.) Addresses on postal cards

and unsealed circulars. Addresses upon postal cards and unsealed circulars may be either written, printed, or affixed thereto, at the option of the sender. (19 Stat. 82.)

Preceding provisions of this section, omitted here, fixed the rates of postage on transient newspapers, etc., and printed matter of the third class, and prescribed what inscriptions might be made on such matter. They were superseded by Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, § 17, ante, $ 7315, which fixed the rates of postage on third-class matter, and Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $ 22, 20 Stat. 360, which defined wbat marks might be made on said matter, which

was superseded by Act Jan. 20, 1888, c. 2, § 1, post, $ 7332. § 7332. (Act Jan. 20, 1888, c. 2, § 1.) Permissible marks on and

inclosures in second, third, and fourth class matter. Mailable matter of the second-class shall contain no writing, print, or sign thereon or therein in addition to the original print, except as herein provided, to wit: the name and address of the person to whom the inatter shall be sent, index figures of subscription book either printed or written, the printed title of the publication and the place of its publication, the printed or written name and address without addition of advertisement of the publisher or sender, or both, and written or printed words or figures, or both, indicating the date on which the subscription to such matter will end, the correction of any typographical error, a mark except by written or printed words, to designate a work or passage to which it is desired to call attention: the words “sample copy” when the matter is sent as such, the words "marked copy” when the matter contains a marked item or article, and publishers or news agents may inclose in their publications, bills, receipts, and orders for subscriptions thereto, but the same shall be in such form as to convey no other information than the name, place of publication, subscription price of the publication to which they refer and the subscription due thereon. Upon matter of the third class or upon the wrapper or envelope inclosing the same or the tag or lable attached thereto the sender may write his own name, occupation, and residence or business address, preceded by the word "from," and may make marks other than by written or printed words to call attention to any word or passage in the text, and may correct any typographical errors. There may be placed upon the blank leaves or cover of any book or printed matter of the third-class a simple manuscript dedication or inscription not of the nature of a personal correspondence. Upon the wrapper or envelope of third-class matter or the tag or lable attached thereto may be printed any matter mailable as third-class, but there must be left on the address side a space sufficient for a legible address and necessary stamps. With a package of fourth-class matter prepaid at the proper rate for that class, the sender may inclose any mailable third-class matter, and may write upon the wrapper or cover thereof, or tag or label accompanying the same, his name, occupation, residence or business address, preceded by the word "from," and any marks, numbers, names, or letters for purpose of description, or may print thereon the same, and any printed matter not in the nature of a personal correspondence, but there must be left on the address side or face of the package a space sufficient for a legible address and necessary stamps. In all cases directions for transmit, delivery, forwarding, or return shall be deemed part of the address; and the PostmasterGeneral shall prescribe suitable regulations for carrying this section into effect. (25 Stat. 1.)

This was the first section of an act entitled “An act relating to permissible marks, printing or writing, upon second, third, and fourth-class matter, and to amend the twenty-second and twenty-third sections of an act entitled 'An act making appropriations for the service of the Post-Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty, and for other purposes.'"

Section 2 of this act provided that matter of the second, third, or fourth class containing any writing or printing in addition to the original matter, other than that authorized by this section, should not be admitted to the mails, nor delivered, except upon payment of first-class postage, and made it punishable knowingly to conceal or inclose any matter of a higher class in that of a lower class and mail it at a less rate than would be charged for both such higher and lower class matter. It was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 221 thereof, post, $ 10391, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $$ 22, 23, 20 Stat. 360, 361, mentioned in the title of this act as amended thereby, were superseded by the provisions of this act, and section 23 of that act also was repealed by Criminal Code, & 341, post, & 10515.

This section also superseded a previous provision allowing any item or article in a newspaper to be marked for observation, except by written or printed words, without increase of postage, of Act March 3, 1885, c. 342, § 1, 23 Stat. 387.

Provisions additional to those of this section, relating to permissible marks on third and fourth-class matter, were made by Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 6, post, $ 7333.

$ 7333. (Act March 4, 1911, c. 241, § 6.) Permissible marks on

third and fourth class matter. In addition to the permissible marks, writing, and printing on mail matter of the third and fourth classes, respectively, or on the envelopes or packages containing them, as authorized by the Act of Congress approved January twentieth, eighteen hundred and eighty-eight, entitled "An Act relating to permissible marks, printing, or writing, upon second, third, and fourth class matter, and to amend the twentysecond and twenty-third sections of an Act entitled 'An Act making appropriations for the service of the Post Office Department for the fiscal year ending June thirtieth, eighteen hundred and eighty, and for other purposes, ;"" there may be placed on such mail matter, or on the package, wrapper, or envelope inclosing the same, or on a tag or label attached thereto, either in writing or otherwise, the words “Please do not open until Christmas," or words to that effect. (36 Stat. 1340.)

This section was part of the postal service appropriation act for the fiscal year 1912, cited above.

Act Jan. 20, 1888, c. 2, mentioned in this section, is set forth ante, $ 7332. $ 7334. (R. S. § 3880.) Metric postal balances.

The Postmaster-General shall furnish to the post-offices exchanging mails with foreign countries, and to such other offices as he may deem expedient, postal balances denominated in grams of the metric system, fifteen grams of which shall be the equivalent for postal purposes, of one-half ounce avoirdupois, and so on in progression.

Act July 27, 1866, c. 281, 14 Stat. 301. Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 135, 17 Stat. 301.

(R. S. § 3881. Superseded.) This section authorized the Postmaster-General to prescribe by regulation the manner of wrapping and securing for the mails all matter not charged with letter postage, so that it might be conveniently examined by postmasters, and, if not so wrapped and secured, it should be subject to letter postage.

It was superseded by Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $ 24, post, $ 7335. § 7335. (Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, § 24.) Wrapping and secur

ing matter not charged with first-class postage. The Postmaster General may prescribe, by regulation, the manner of wrapping and securing for the mails all packages of matter not charged with first class postage, so that the contents of such packages may be easily examined; and no package the contents of which cannot be easily examined shall pass in the mails, or be delivered at a less rate than for matter of the first class. (20 Stat. 361.)

See notes to section 7 of this act, ante, $ 7302.

This section superseded R. S. § 3881. See note under that section, ante. § 7336. (R. S. § 3882.) Removing wrappers.

Postmasters at the office of delivery may remove the wrappers and envelopes from mail-matter not charged with letter-postage, when it can be done without destroying them, for the purpose of ascertaining whether there is upon or connected with any such matter anything which would authorize or require the charge of a higher rate of postage thereon.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, 8 137, 17 Stat. 301.

Provisions authorizing the examination of second and fourth class mailmatter at the office of mailing were made by Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, 88

12, 21, ante, 88 7305, 7328. § 7337. (R. S. § 3883.) Newspapers to be dried and in wrappers.

No newspapers shall be received to be conveyed by mail unless they are sufficiently dried and inclosed in proper wrappers.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 138, 17 Stat. 301.

(R. S. § 3884. Superseded.) This section provided that where newspapers or other periodicals were received at a post-office, directed to one address, and a list of the names of the subscribers to whom they belonged, with a postage for a quarter in advance, the postmaster should deliver such papers to their owners. It was super seded by Act June 23, 1874, c. 456, 88 5, 6, post, 88 7356, 7357.

§ 7338. (R. S. § 3885.) Notice of refusal to receive newspapers.

Postmasters shall notify the publisher of any newspaper, or other periodical, when any subscriber shall refuse to take the same from the office, or neglect to call for it for the period of one month.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, § 140, 17 Stat. 301.

The Postmaster-General was authorized to provide by regulations for the disposition of printed and mailable matter which might remain in any postoffice not called for by the addressee, by R. S. § 4061, post, $ 7423.

(R. S. § 3886. Superseded.) This section authorized publishers of newspapers and periodicals to print or write on their publications sent to regular subscribers the address of the subscriber and the date when the subscription expires, and to inclose therein bills and receipts for subscriptions, without subjecting the publication to extra postage. It was superseded by Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $ 22, 20 Stat. 361, and by Act Jan. 20, 1888, c. 2, § 1, ante, $ 7332.

(R. S. § 3887. Repealed.) This section, which made it punishable to inclose any letter, etc., in or make any writing, etc., on mail matter not charged with letter postage, and Act March 3, 1879, c. 180, $ 23, 20 Stat. 361, and Act Jan. 20, 1888, c. 2, & 2, 25 Stat. 2, relating to the same subject, were incorporated in the Criminal Code in section 221 thereof, post, $ 10391, and were repealed by section 341 there

of, post, § 10515. § 7339. (R. S. § 3888.) Carrying newspapers out of mail.

Contractors or mail-carriers may convey, out of the mail, newspapers for sale or distribution to subscribers.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, $ 143, 17 Stat. 301. § 7340. (R. S. § 3889.) Delivery of newspapers by route-agents.

The Postmaster-General may provide by order the terms upon which route-agents may receive from publishers or any news agents in charge thereof, and deliver the same as directed, if presented and called for at the mail-car or steamer, packages of newspapers and other periodicals not received from or intended for delivery at any post-office.

Act June 8, 1872, c. 335, § 144, 17 Stat. 301.

(R. S. 88 3890, 3891. Repealed.) R. S. § 3890, made it punishable for any postmaster unlawfully to detain in his office any mail matter, the posting of which was not prohibited by law, with intent to prevent its delivery.

R. S. § 3891, made it punishable for any postal employé to detain, delay, or open a letter, packet, bag, or mail of letters or to embezzle or destroy any of them.

These sections were incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 195 thereof, and were repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

(R. S. § 3892. Repealed.) This section made it punishable for any person to take a letter, postal card or packet from a post-office, or carrier, with intent to obstruct the correspondence, or to secrete, embezzle or destroy the same. It was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 194 thereof, post, $ 10374, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

(R. S. § 3893. Repealed.) This section, as amended by Act July 12, 1876, c. 186, § 1, 19 Stat. 90, and Act Sept. 26, 1888, c. 1039, § 2, 25 Stat. 496, made it punishable to mail obscene books, etc., and articles for indecent or immoral use. It was incorCOMP.ST.'13–206

(3281)

porated into the Criminal Code in section 211 thereof, post, $ 10381, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Previous to the repeal of said section it was again amended by a provision of Act May 27, 1908, c. 206, 35 Stat. 416, as follows:

"That section thirty-eight hundred and ninety-three of the Revised Statutes of the United States be, and the same is hereby, amended by adding thereto the following: “And the term "indecent" within the intendment of this section shall include matter of a character tending to incite arson, murder, or assassination.''

The provision added by this amendment was not included in Criminal Code, $ 211, in which Rev. St. § 3893, was incorporated.

(R. S. § 3894. Repealed.) This section, as amended by Act July 12, 1876, c. 186, § 2, 19 Stat. 90, and Act Sept. 19, 1890, c. 908, § 1, 26 Stat. 465, made punishable to mail letters, postal cards, or circulars concerning any lottery or gift enterprise. It was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 213 thereof, post, s

10383, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515. § 7341. (Act March 2, 1889, c. 393, $ 3.) Identification of persons

claiming mail under fictitious address. The Postmaster-General may, upon evidence satisfactory to him, that any person is using any fictitious, false, or assumed name, title, or address in conducting, promoting, or carrying on or assisting therein, by means of the Post-Office Establishment of the United States, any business scheme or device in violation of the provisions of this act, instruct any postmaster at any post-office at which such letters, cards, or packets, addressed to such fictitious, false, or assumed name or address arrive to notify the party claiming or receiving such letters, cards, or packets to appear at the post-office and be identified; and if the party so notified fail to appear and be identified, or if it shall satisfactorily appear that such letters, cards, or packets are addressed to a fictitious, false, or assumed name or address, such letters, postal-cards, or packages shall be forwarded to the dead-letter office as fictitious matter. (25 Stat. 873.)

This section and the two sections next following were part of an act entitled "An act to punish dealers and pretended dealers in counterfeit money and other fraudulent devices for using the United States mails."

Section 1 of said act amended R. S. § 5480, which, as so amended, was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 215 thereof, post, 1038, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Section 2 of the act made punishable the fraudulent assumption of a fictitious address in the use of the mails with intent to defraud by means of spurious coin, counterfeit money, etc., and was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 216 thereof, post, f 10386, and was repealed by section 341 thereof, post, s 10515.

Act June 18, 1888, c. 394, § 2, 25 Stat. 187, as amended by Act Sept. 26, 1888, c. 1039, 25 Stat. 496, relating to indecent, libelous, etc., matter on envelopes, wrappers, etc., and postal cards, was incorporated into the Criminal Code in section 212 thereof, post, § 10382, and was repealed, with the amendatory act, by section 341 thereof, post, $ 10515.

Letters, parcels, etc., containing certain insect pests, etc., whether sealed as first-class matter or not, were declared nonmailable matter, except when mailed for scientific purposes under regulations provided for, and depositing, etc., such matter for mailing, etc., was made punishable, by Act March 2, 1905, c. 1501, $$ 2, 3, post, $8 8749, 8750.

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