The Westminster review [afterw.] The London and Westminster review [afterw.] The Westminster review [afterw.] The Westminster and foreign quarterly review [afterw.] The Westminster review [ed. by sir J. Bowring and other].

Pirmais vāks
sir John Bowring
1877
 

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Populāri fragmenti

375. lappuse - The use of this FEIGNED HISTORY hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it...
380. lappuse - If we shadows have offended. Think but this, and all is mended, That you have but slumber'd here, While these visions did appear. And this weak and idle theme, No more yielding but a dream, Gentles, do not reprehend: If you pardon, we will mend.
385. lappuse - And be these juggling fiends no more believed, ;>< That palter with us in a double sense; That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope.
375. lappuse - Nature never set forth the earth in so rich tapestry as divers poets have done, neither with pleasant rivers, fruitful trees, sweet-smelling flowers, nor whatsoever else may make the too much loved earth more lovely. Her world is brazen, the poets only deliver a golden.
336. lappuse - Out of the bowels of the harmless earth, Which many a good tall fellow had destroy'd So cowardly ; and but for these vile guns He would himself have been a soldier.
161. lappuse - Equity is a roguish thing; for law we have a measure, know what to trust to ; equity is according to the conscience of him that is chancellor, and as that is larger or narrower, so is equity.
445. lappuse - Then the master of the house being angry said to his servant, Go out quickly into the streets and lanes of the city, and bring in hither the poor, and the maimed, and the halt, and the blind.
403. lappuse - But this general ill effect, however, results from them, that they deprive neighbouring nations of that free communication and exchange which the Author of the world has intended, by giving them soils, climates, and geniuses, so different from each -other.
378. lappuse - The Winter's Tale is sneered at by B. Jonson, in the Induction to Bartholomew Fair, 1614: " If there be never a servant-monster in the fair, who can help it, nor a nest of antiques? He is loth to make nature afraid in his plays, like those that beget TALES, Tempests, and such like drolleries.
564. lappuse - WITH pipe and flute the rustic Pan Of old made music sweet for man ; And wonder hushed the warbling bird, And closer drew the calm-eyed herd, — The rolling river slowlier ran. Ah I would, — ah ! would, a little span, Some air of Arcady could fan This age of ours, too seldom stirred With pipe and flute...

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