Handbook of Aging and Mental Health: An Integrative Approach

Pirmais vāks
Jacob Lomranz
Springer Science & Business Media, 1998. gada 30. sept. - 539 lappuses
De cibo quod superest nobis sufficit; oportet gratias agere. Some elders have accepted this proposition, although seldom with enthu­ siasm. Gerontologists also have been burdened with the adage: "Leftovers are good enough for us, and we should be grateful for them." I remember how a clerk tried to palm off astale and cheap cigar to her octogenarian customer. He knew better and carne away with a far superior smoke. The clerk fumed, "What does he need a good cigar for? Who is he to be particular!" In this and in many other ways, elders often have labored under the sociocultural expectation that they should be well content with whatever scraps and shmattes happen to come their way. Gerontologists can identify with this situation. The systematic study of aging and the aged was a new enterprise at the midpoint of this century, but the concepts and methods were pretty much limited to those already on hand. What biological and sociobehavioral scientists had been doing for years was simply extended to the newly annexed territory. This as not only a convenient but also a cost-effective strategy. Data accumulated more rapidly by remaining within familiar frarnes of reference and relying on farniliar designs and mea­ sures. The new gerontologists soon harvested a promising crop of descriptive findings. Within a decade after the establishment of the Gerontological Society of America (1947), it was possible to discern the outlines of a valuable new field of knowledge.

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Saturs

Declarative and Differential Aspects of Subjective WellBeing and Its Implications for Mental Health in Later Life
15
Control Cognitive and Motivational Implications
45
Resilience in Adulthood and Later Life Defining Features and Dynamic Processes
69
STRESS COPING AND MENTAL HEALTH
97
Toward a Developmentally Informed Theory of Mental Disorder in Older Adults
101
Conservation of Resources Stress and Aging Why Do Some Slide and Some Spring?
121
War Trauma and the Aged An Israeli Perspective
135
Toward a TemporalSpatial Model of Cumulative Life Stress Placing LateLife Stress Effects in a LifeCourse Perspective
153
THE FAMILY IN LATER LIFE
319
Perspectives on the Family and Stress in Late Life
323
A Frame of Reference for Guiding Research Regarding the Relationship between Adult Attachment and Mental Health in Aging Families
341
Multigenerational Families and Mental Illness in Late Life
355
CrossCultural Perspective on Attitudes toward Family Responsibility and WellBeing in Later Years
383
MEMORY AND DEMENTIA
413
The Significance of Memory Complaints in Later Life Methodological and Theoretical Considerations
417
AgeRelated Cognitive Decline and the Dementia Threshold
435

THE ADULT DEVELOPING SELF
179
The Double Voice of the Third Age Splitting the Speaking Self as an Adaptive Strategy in Later Life
183
Epistemology Expectation and Aging A Developmental Analysis of the Gerontological Curriculum
197
An Image of Aging and the Concept of Aintegration Coping and Mental Health Implications
217
PSYCHODYNAMICS AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY IN LATER LIFE
251
Psychoanalysis the Life Story and Aging Creating New Meanings within Narratives of Lived Experience
255
The Psychoimmune System in Later Life The Problem of the LateOnset Disorders
281
Uses of the Past in Adult Psychological Health Objective Historical and Narrative Realities
297
Education and Dementia
449
DEPRESSION AND AGING
459
Depression as a Pivotal Component in Secondary Aging Opportunities for Research Treatment and Prevention
463
The Variability of Depression in Old Age Narrative as an Integrative Construct
483
Aging and Behavioral Medicine A Triaxial Model
497
Future Perspectives
511
Index
521
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8. lappuse - normal science' means research firmly based upon one or more past scientific achievements, achievements that some particular scientific community acknowledges for a time as supplying the foundation for its further practice.
3. lappuse - That is why a new theory, however special its range of application, is seldom or never just an increment to what is already known. Its assimilation requires the reconstruction of prior theory and the re-evaluation of prior fact, an intrinsically revolutionary process that is seldom completed by a single man and never overnight.
8. lappuse - Men whose research is based on shared paradigms are committed to the same rules and standards for scientific practice. That commitment and the apparent consensus it produces are prerequisites for normal science, ie, for the genesis and continuation of a particular research tradition.

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