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such adjuncts as X-rays, laboratory, and pharmacy services. Our outpatient program represents one of our major undertakings;

(3) Dental care, approximately 3 million examinations, treatments, and operations during the year;

(4) Care of remains of 1,641 estimated deaths; and

(5) Training and education of a daily average of 4,026 enlisted and officer personnel, including 2,210 in our Medical Department schools; 1,472 in naval hospitals and other medical facilities and 344 in civilian institutions.

FINANCIAL SUMMARY

Details of our financial requirements and changes in specific programs, are included in justification material which has been provided to your committee. In summary, our appropriation request in the coming year amounts to $92,520,000. This is approximately $4,100,000 more than our current fiscal year availability and is required in the following areas: (a) Additional personal services in naval hospitals, primarily in

nursing care, both inpatient and outpatient, and food service
for patients.

$1, 700,000 (b) Additional requirements for care in nonnaval facilities for dependents ($1,200,000) and retired personnel ($100,000)

1,300,000 (c) Replacement of diagnostic, therapeutic, and related technical medical equipment in naval hospitals.-

700,000 (d) Other maintenance and operation requirements in medical treatment facilities -

400,000

Total.---

4, 100, 000

ANALYSIS OF REQUIREMENTS

There is a series of charts attached to this statement which we feel will assist the committee in analyzing our requirements. With your permission, I would like to say a few words on each of the six charts.

Chart No. 1, lists the types of medical facilities supported in whole or in part by the funds provided by the budget activity “Medical Care," and is indicative of the scope and magnitude of the Medical Department's mission. Our responsibilities, both professional and financial, extend throughout the Navy and Marine Corps, including both the Shore Establishment and the operating forces.

Chart No. 2, summarizes the population served by the Medical Department of the Navy.

This is our potential population totalling 2,191,485. There are 800,000 active duty Marine Corps and Navy personnel, or 36.5 percent of this total. Dependents of active duty Navy and Marine Corps total 920,000, or 42 percent. Retired personnel amount to 141,000, or 6 percent, and civilian employees who are entitled to on-the-job type care, 330,000.

Chart No. 3, depicts our estimated hospital workload in 1962. Approximately 62 percent of our patients will be active duty Navy and Marine Corps personnel; the remaining 38 percent will be supernumeraries, of whom 47 percent will be dependents of military personnel.

Out of the total patient population in naval hospitals of 10,302, 6,000 and some will be active duty Navy and Marine Corps members. These will constitute 61 percent. Of the supernumerary block, the Army will have 434 patients. These are Army personnel who are hospitalized under the joint utilization program in naval hospitals.

The Air Force will have 272 patients. There will be a total of 1,854 dependents; 405 veterans whom we have been authorized to hospitalize throughout the hospital system; 790 retired personnel; and 175 others.

There will be 212,000 anticipated total admissions to hospitals.

The average length of patient stay, we anticipate, will be 17.7 days. As I mentioned before, we anticipate over 36,000 births.

We will see over 312 million outpatients in our offices and clinics in naval hospitals and we will provide to this group of people over 9 million professional services.

Chart No. 4, shows our total requirements (including reimbursements) by budget program. The major portion of our total requirements, amounting to nearly 57 percent, is for program 1810, supporting naval hospitals and specialized medical facilities. This requirement, together with program 1820, which provides for care abroad ships and other units of the operating forces, and program 1835, which is for care in nonnaval medical treatment facilities, such as those of the Army, the Air Force, and civilian facilities, accounts for over 92 percent of our total needs. Thus, over 92 percent of our requirements are for direct medical and dental care. The remaining 8 percent covers such programs as education and training, nonrecurring procurement, medical material support, care of the dead, and departmental administration.

Chart No. 5, reflects our estimated obligations per patient day in naval hospitals during 1962, by major categories of expense. Civilian personal services in hospitals will account for approximately 53 percent of our obligations; subsistence, almost 10 percent; and 37 percent for maintenance and operation.

This is a breakdown of the $16.83 per day, the distribution of that amount of money by the various services provided. As you can see, the personal services, which always constítute a major factor in the operation of medical treatment facilities, constitute well over 50 percent of these dollars.

Chart No. 6, reflects our actual average cost per patient day in naval hospitals, during fiscal year 1960. This chart includes military pay, which is not financed by this appropriation and is, therefore, not entirely comparable with our budget.

(The charts referred to above follow:)

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ADMINISTRATION

AND
226
OTEROPTR
DENIZED
PATIENTS

,
INCLUDING

SUCH
DEPENDENTS

,
BENEFICIARIES

OF
BUREATEGORIES

AS
PUBLIC
HEALTH
SERVICE

AND

APPROPRIATIONI OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY

MAJOR ACTIVITY 4: MEDICAL CARE (Program 18)

FISCAL YEAR 1962 BUDGET ESTIMATES

POPULATION SERVED

TOTAL

2,191,485

100%

Active-duty Navy and Marine
Corp

800,000 - 36.5%

315

1

Dependents of Active-duty Navy
and Marine Corps

920,000 - 42.0%

141,485- 6.4%

Retired Novy and Marine
HCorps

Li Li-9,
Civilian Employees – on the
job Outpatient care

* 330,000 – 15.1%

IN ADDITION TO THE ABOVE, INPATIENT CARE WILL ALSO BE

FORCE405 THE

COAST GUARD PERSONNEL AND

EMPLOYEES' COMPENSATION, FOREIGN
MILITARY PERSONNEL, CIVILIAN HUMANITARIAN CASES, AND RED CROSS PERSONNEL. OUTPATIENT CARE WILL ALSO BE
PROVIDED FOR THESE CATEGORIES OF PERSONNEL. WEDICUT CVSE (COULOW 10)

[graphic]
[graphic]

APPROPRIATION: OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY

MAJOR ACTIVITY 4: MEDICAL CARE (Program 18)

[blocks in formation]
[graphic]

Army-434 Air Force-272

Dependents -1,854

Other-175
Retired - 790
Veterans - 405

TOTAL PATIENTS IN NAVAL
HOSPITALS

10,302-100%

as0'000 - VSC

Active-duty Novy and Marine
Corps Potionts

6,372 - 61.9%

Supernumorory Patients

2

3,930 - 38.1 %

TOTAL ADMISSIONS
AVERAGE LENGTH OF PATIENT STAY
TOTAL BIRTHS
TOTAL OUT PATIENTS
TOTAL OUTPATIENT SERVICES

212,065

17.7
36,500
3,697,815
9,337,065

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