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(6) Is able to accommodate the national matches without interference to the training of Reserve components. The Chief of Reserve Components Division, Headquarters, 5th U.S. Army, agrees. In fact, substantial saving to the Government can be realized if competitive marksmanship and Re serve components both use Camp Atterbury.

(7) Has range facilities and expansion area within easy access (3 miles) of the housing area.

(8) Has exceptionally fine administrative setup and facilities for housing of administrative and visiting personnel in the form of two messes and bachelor-type quarters in the hospital area.

(9) Has an excellent trailer site which can readily be expanded and has 100 PHA family type units.

(10) Has an abundance of barracks and service buildings with mess buildings capable of being converted to small consolidated messes. b. Other pertinent data is tabulated in inclosure 5. 8. Findings.

a. The committee finds by unanimous vote that Camp Atterbury is the most suitable station in the United States for a future site for the national matches. No comparison was made with Camp Perry, Ohio, and no commitment is made in this paper which would select Camp Atterbury over Camp Perry or Camp Perry over Camp Atterbury. The committee wants to record incidentally that there are no major considerations to preclude the selection of Camp Breckinridge if for some reason Camp Atterbury has to be eliminated from consideration.

b. The committee further finds that approximately $3,512,000 is needed as an initial outlay to provide adequate first-class facilities for the national matches at Camp Atterbury.

c. The committee believes that the most optimistic date that a shift could be made from Camp Perry to Camp Atterbury would be for the 1958 matches,

9. Recommendations :

That Camp Atterbury be considered as the most suitable station in the United States (Camp Perry, Ohio, not considered) as a future site for the National Matches.

PHILIP BOTCHIN,
Lieutenant Colonel, Engineer,

Engineer Section, CONARC.

S. C. CARPENTER,
Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry,

Infantry Section, CONARC.

ELLIS LEA,
Lieutenant Colonel, Infantry,

NBPRP, DA.
N. I. FOOKS,

Colonel, Infantry,
Infantry Section, CONARC, Chairman.

H. H. TARDY,
Civilian, G-4 Section, CONARC.

W. E. DAY,
Civilian, G-3 Section, CONARC.

R. W. BLANCHARD,

Civilian, (OCE) ODCSLOG, DA. Mr. Ford. Can we have put in the record this information we have requested every year, the ammunition issue on a chart basis showing what you have used starting with fiscal year 1959 ?

(The matter referred to appears on p. 384.) Colonel LEE. Yes, sir.

Mr. Ford. Also the chart material which shows participants supported by the National Board ?

Colonel LEE. I believe you have in mind bringing up to date the charts you have in last year's record.

Mr. FORD. Yes.
Colonel LEE. Yes.

(The information to be supplied follows:)

Number of rifle clubs and schools enrolled with the Director of Civilian Marksmanship

at the end of fiscal years 1951-60

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Individual members of rifle clubs and schools enrolled with the Director of

Civilian Marksmanship at the end of fiscal years 1951-60

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Mr. WEAVER. On page 2 of your statement where you give the percentage breakdown of the age group, 12 to 18 years, 56 percent, what would the other 34 percent be as far as the age group is concerned ?

Colonel LEE. People over 18.
Mr. WEAVER. From where to where?

Colonel LEE. You will note, if you look at the same chart, from 19 to 25 years constitutes another 6.7 percent. Then 26 years and over, which would be the remainder, 37.5.

I point out school cadets, the last item in the chart, is a part of the 12- to 18-year group. That constitutes only 1.2 percent of our total, but they are under 18 years of age, the school cadet group.

Mr. MINSHALL. No questions.
(Off the record.)
Mr. MINSHALL. Thank you, gentlemen.

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 8, 1961.

OPERATION AND MAINTENANCE, NAVY

WITNESSES VICE ADM. JOHN SYLVESTER, USN, DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVAL

OPERATIONS (LOGISTICS) VICE ADM. R. B. PIRIE, USN, DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERA

TIONS (AIR) VICE ADM. W. D. SMEDBERG III, USN, CHIEF OF NAVAL PERSONNEL REAR ADM. P. D. STROOP, USN, CHIEF, BUREAU OF NAVAL WEAPONS REAR ADM. J. W. CRUMPACKER, USN, DIRECTOR, MATERIAL AND

BUDGET DIVISION, OFFICE OF CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS REAR ADM. E. J. PELTIER, CHIEF, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS

AND CHIEF OF CIVIL ENGINEERS CAPT. FRANK C. JONES, USN, COMPTROLLER, BUREAU OF SHIPS J. W. COCHRANE, COMPTROLLER, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS CAPT. A. C. HUSBAND, ASSISTANT CHIEF FOR ADMINISTRATION

AND COMPTROLLER, BUREAU OF YARDS AND DOCKS D. B. MEDLIN, ASSISTANT STATUS AND REVIEW OFFICER, BUREAU

OF NAVAL WEAPONS REAR ADM. L. ENSEY, USN, DEPUTY COMPTROLLER OF THE NAVY REAR ADM. M. A. HIRSCH, USN, ASSISTANT COMPTROLLER, DIREC

TOR OF BUDGET AND REPORTS

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NAVY
Personnel compensation:

Permanent positions..
Positions other than permanent..
Other personnel compensation..

Total, personnel compensation..
Direct obligations:

11 Personnel compensation..
12 Personnel benefits..
13 Benefits for former personnel.
21 Travel and transportation of persons.
22 Transportation of things..
23 Rent, communications, and utilities.
24 Printing and reproduction..
25 Other services..

Services of other agencies.
Labor contracts with foreign governments 1
Private foreign labor contracts ?
Labor provided by Berlin Magistrat and mainte-

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nance and minor construction at Spanish base

complex 3.
26 Supplies and materials.
31 Equipment..
32 Lands and structures.
41 Grants, subsidies, and contributions,
42 Insurance claims and indemnities
Unvouchered.

Subtotal..
Deduct portion of foregoing obligations originally charged

to object classes 25, 26, and 31. Total, direct obligations

35 571, 273 157, 712 24, 432 1, 355

221 5,859

35 579, 838 43, 597 24, 257 1, 393

210 6,312

1,000 607, 030 58, 514 26,938 1, 454

210 7,119

2, 567, 431

2,581, 759

8,065

2, 631, 700

7,700

7,670

2, 573, 694

2, 559,761

2, 624,000

See footnotes at end of table.

Object classification Continued

[In thousands)

1960 actual

1961 estimate 1962 estimate

NAVY-continued

Reimbursable obligations:

11 Personnel compensation.
12 Personnel benefits.
21 Travel and transportation of persons.
22 Transportation of things
23 Rent, communications, and utilities.
24 Printing and reproduction..
25 Other services.
26 Supplies and materials
31 Equipment..
41 Grants, subsidies, and contributions.
Unvouchered...

$30, 136
1,774

276

$37,909
2,015

$39.350 2,047

671

165 8,182

213 66,219 56, 778 15, 223

55 459

(31

163 8, 974

251 53, 106 47, 445 8, 568

70 565

173 8,935

259 44.029 37, 750 5, 480

70 236

179, 509

160,000

139,000

Total, reimbursable obligations.

Subtotal.
Less intrafund obligations-

Total, Navy...

2, 753, 203

28, 214

2, 719, 761

24, 200

2, 703,000

24, 600

2, 724, 990

2,695, 561

2,73%, 100

ALLOCATION TO ATOMIC ENERGY COMMISSION

25 Other services...

7, 331

Total, obligations...

2. 732, 320

2,695, 561

2, 738, 400

1 Average number of persons: 1960, 16,051; 1961, 15,465; 1962, 15,410.
2 Average number of persons: 1960), 555; 1961, 399; 1962, 321.
3 Average number of persons: 1960, 11; 1961, 11; 1962, 711.

Personnel summary

1960 actual

1961 estimate 1962 estimate

Total number of permanent positions.
Full-time equivalent of other positions.
Average number of all employees.
Number of employees at end of year.
Average GS grade..
Average GS salary.
Average salary of ungraded positions...

165, 350

18 155, 717 153, 100

6. 2 $5, 432 $5, 100

161, 103

21 157.871 155, 228

6.3 $5,918 $5, 317

160,033

21 156, 325 156, 659

6.4 $5.930 $5, 328

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Program by activities:
Direct obligations:

1. General expenses, Navy personnel.
2. Weapons and facilities
3. Ships and facilities.
4. Medical care.
5. Civil engineering-
6. Servicewide supply
7. Servicewide operations.
8. Vaval petroleum reserves.

Total, direct obligations..
Reimbursable obligations:

1. General expenses, Navy personnel.
2. Weapons and facilities
3. Ships and facilities.
4. Medical care.
5. Civil engineering.
6. Servicewide supply
7. Servicewide operations.
8. Naval petroleum reserves.

Total, reimbursable obligations...

Subtotal
Less intrafund obligations

Total, obligations.....
Financing:

Comparative transfers to other accounts.
Comparative transfers from other accounts (goods and

services provided by Berlin Magistrat)
Unobligated balance brought forward (69 Stat. 438).
Unobligated military assistance orders transferred to other

service accounts.
Advances and reimbursements from--

Military assistance orders.
Other accounts
Non-Federal sources (5 U.S.C. 61(b); 10 U.S.C. 2481,

2663, 2667, 6011; 22 U.S.C. 1816; and 40 U.S.C. 481(c)). l'nobligated balance carried forward (69 Stat. 438) Unobligated balance lapsing ....

New obligational authority..
New obligational authority:

Appropriation.
Transferred to-

“Emergency fund, Department of Defense" (73 Stat.

377).
“Operation and maintenance, Army" (5 U.S.C. 172(a)).
"Operating expenses, National Archives and Records
Service,” General Services Administration..

Appropriation (adjusted)..
Proposed supplemental due to pay increases.

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GENERAL STATEMENT OF DEPUTY CHIEF OF NAVAL OPERATIONS

(LOGISTICS) Mr. Sikes. The committee is now ready to begin its hearings on "Operation and maintenance, Navy." We will begin these hearings with a summary statement by Vice Adm. John Sylvester. After the statement by Admiral Sylvester, we will have a special statement on the maintenance of facilities which will state how the Navy is progressing with a new system designed to account separately for the cost of maintaining its farflung physical plant. Following this presentation we will have a period of general questions pertaining to the whole of maintenance and operations, and then proceed with the separate presentations by Bureaus.

All right, Admiral Sylvester, will you proceed?

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