Adventures of a Younger Son

Pirmais vāks
T. Fisher Unwin, 1890 - 521 lappuses

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130. lappuse - And first one universal shriek there rush'd, Louder than the loud ocean, like a crash Of echoing thunder; and then all was hush'd, Save the wild wind and the remorseless dash Of billows; but at intervals there gush'd, Accompanied with a convulsive splash, A solitary shriek, the bubbling cry Of some strong swimmer in his agony.
99. lappuse - There is a pleasure in the pathless woods, There is a rapture on the lonely shore ; There is society, where none intrudes, By the deep sea, and music in its roar : I love not man the less, but nature more...
56. lappuse - And from that hour did I with earnest thought Heap knowledge from forbidden mines of lore, Yet nothing that my tyrants knew or taught I cared to learn, but from that secret store Wrought linked armour for my soul, before It might walk forth to war among mankind...
242. lappuse - Sublime tobacco ! which from east to west Cheers the tar's labour or the Turkman's rest ; Which on the Moslem's ottoman divides His hours, and rivals opium and his brides ; Magnificent in Stamboul, but less grand, Though not less loved, in Wapping or the Strand ; Divine in hookas, glorious in a pipe, When tipp'd with amber, mellow, rich, and ripe ; Like other charmers, wooing the caress More dazzlingly when daring in full dress ; Yet thy true lovers more admire by far Thy naked beauties — Give...
337. lappuse - A long, long kiss, a kiss of youth, and love, And beauty, all concentrating like rays Into one focus, kindled from above; Such kisses as belong to early days, Where heart, and soul, and sense, in concert move. And the blood's lava, and the pulse a blaze, Each kiss a heart-quake, — for a kiss's strength, I think it must be reckon'd by its length.
112. lappuse - I'm in the world alone, Upon the wide, wide sea : But why should I for others groan, When none will sigh for me ? Perchance my dog will whine in vain, Till fed by stranger hands ; But long ere I come back again He'd tear me where he stands. " With thee, my bark, I'll swiftly go Athwart the foaming brine ; Nor care what land thou bear'st me to, So not again to mine. Welcome, welcome, ye dark blue waves ! And when you fail my sight, Welcome, ye deserts, and ye caves ! My native land— Good Night !
193. lappuse - DEFORMED persons are commonly even with nature ; for as nature hath done ill by them, so do they by nature; being for the most part, as the Scripture saith, void of natural affection: and so they have their revenge of nature.
269. lappuse - Blow fair, thou breeze ! — she anchors ere the dark. Already doubled is the cape — our bay Receives that prow which proudly spurns the spray. How gloriously...
108. lappuse - Verse echoes not one beating of their hearts, History is but the shadow of their shame, Art veils her glass, or from the pageant starts As to oblivion their blind millions fleet, Staining that Heaven with obscene imagery Of their own likeness. What are numbers knit By force or custom ? Man who man would be, Must rule the empire of himself; in it Must be supreme, establishing his throne On vanquished will, quelling the anarchy Of hopes and fears, being himself alone.
163. lappuse - Few things surpass old wine ; and they may preach Who please, — the more because they preach in vain, — Let us have wine and women, mirth and laughter, Sermons and soda-water the day after.

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