The Future of National Urban Policy

Pirmais vāks
Duke University Press, 1990 - 405 lappuses
The Future of National Urban Policy brings together scholars, policymakers, and journalists to explore the condition of America's cities. The authors focus on policies of the previous five presidential administrations to examine the history of urban policy and offer suggestions for its future. Individual chapters address a variety of topics, including housing, employment, education, the infrastructure of cities, and public policy.

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Populāri fragmenti

341. lappuse - Some people feel that the government in Washington should see to it that every person has a job and a good standard of living.
340. lappuse - Some people think the government should provide fewer services, even in areas such as health and education, in order to reduce spending.
65. lappuse - However, in ghetto neighborhoods that have experienced a steady outmigration of middle- and working-class families ... the chances are overwhelming that children will seldom interact on a sustained basis with people who are employed or with families that have a steady breadwinner.
34. lappuse - US Department of Commerce, Bureau of Economic Analysis, National Income and Product Accounts of the United States, 1929-82, Statistical Tables (Washington, DC: US Government Printing Office, 1986), table 3.15, p.
106. lappuse - ... have little to do with the long-run cost of housing capital. Policy analysts should note, however, that the persistent increase in contract rent during a period of substantial new construction suggests that there has been a long-term increase in the rental price of housing capital. Unlike a run-up of energy costs, such a long term trend is not quickly reversed. Over the past...
106. lappuse - The Northeast and the West, areas of vigorous economic expansion, have witnessed the sharpest rent hikes during the decade (Exhibit 7). From 1981 to 1987, real gross rents in the West increased by nearly 19 percent, while those in the Northeast rose approximately 17 percent. More modest rent increases occurred in the Midwest. Only in the South, a region with substantial overbuilding, do gross rents appear to have peaked.
105. lappuse - Gross rent is seemingly the more comprehensive measure, but changes in contract rent have considerable analytical significance. Gross rent, for example, can change as a result of shifting energy prices or other factors that have little to do with the long-run cost of housing capital. Policy analysts should note, however, that the persistent increase in contract rent during a period of substantial new construction suggests that there has been a long-term increase in the rental price of housing capital....
189. lappuse - We can no longer afford to approach the longer-range future haphazardly. As the pace of change accelerates, the process of change becomes more complex. Yet, at the same time an extraordinary array of tools and techniques has been developed by which it becomes increasingly possible to project future trends — and thus to make the kind of informed choices which are necessary if we are to establish mastery over the process of change.
128. lappuse - In housing requirements of households of different types and ages, income alone is a poor measure of the ability of a household to secure adequate housing in the private nonsubsidized market. Federal poverty definitions define the income required by various types of households to consume adequate levels of housing, food, and other necessities. By this measure, only 2.1 million (or 28 percent) of the nation's 7.5 million poverty-level renter households lived in public housing or other subsidized rental...

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