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regulations, we will make it possible for States not to use their Federal funds for legitimate State funding purposes.

We still need to bring the States up to the different levels. There is going to be time to make the transition from where we are today to where we will be in the future. You can't suddenly say next year that you can't use it any more; you have to make some transition.

I think this makes good sense, but you word the law and rules and regulations in such a way so that these funds are additional funds, the same revenue-sharing problems.

We are saying that Federal funds, no matter what the source, must not be used as a replacement for local and State funds, but as additional, incentive money. You put teeth in it if you say that you can have a dollars in Federal funds, then you will get the State funds.

Mr. BRADEMAS. Well, that is a very important point, and I will certainly call your testimony to the attention of Mr. Quie and other members of the committee and subcommittee who are particularly concerned with this legislation.

Your testimony has been very helpful, Mr. Trezza, and again, I want to commend you and the members of the Commission for the good job you have been doing.

I hope when Mr. Mattheis comes up next, he will tell us that the Administration has finally decided to name those other members of the White House Advisory Committee.

Mr. TREZZA. Thank you, Mr. Brademas, and I did send you a letter just the other day including our recommendations on the Higher Education Act extension, as well as on the James Madison Memorial Library problem.

Mr. BRADEMAS. I appreciate that, and I have your letter. Without objection we will include it in the record as well.

[The letter referred to follows:]

NATIONAL COMMISSION ON LIBRARIES AND INFORMATION SCIENCE,

Washington, D.C., December 11, 1975. Hon. JonN BRADEMAS, Chairman, Select Education Subcommittee, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: At its September meeting. the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science passed a resolution on the extension and revision of the Library Services and Construction Act and the extension and revision of the Higher Education Act of 1965. Copies of the resolutions are enclosed herewith.

We have learned through continuous, careful planning and evaluation that there are certain weaknesses in LSCA and HEA that could be eliminated by Congress through legislation. We hope you will consider our resolutions in your deliberations concerning LSCA and HEA. If we can be of any further assistance, please do not hesitate to call on us. Sincerely,

ALPHONSE F. TREZZA,

Erecutive Director. Enclosures.

HIGHER EDUCATION ACT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Stressing the basic role of academic libraries in a nationwide cooperative program of resource sharing, the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science has adopted a resolution calling for the extension and revision of the Higher Education Act of 1965. The resolution calls for fiscal year 1977 appropriations at the levels not less than the amount voted by Congress for fiscal year 1975.

As part of the implementation of its national program document, “Toward a National Program for Library and Information Services: Goals for Action," the Commission further recommends the replacement of the present Part C of Title II with a new authority. This would provide the ability to assist research libraries and urban public libraries which serve as major national research centers for collections and services broadly based and recognized as having national significance.

RESOLUTION ON HIGHER EDUCATION ACT OF 1965

Whereas, the nation's major research libraries are an essential element in undergraduate, advanced, and professional education and research upon which the nation depends; and

Whereas, the development of academic library collections is a continuing and ever more costly activity because of : rising costs for books, periodicals and staff; expansion in the scope of teaching and research programs; and the rapid increase in the worldwide production of recorded knowledge; and

Whereas, library research and demonstration projects have contributed positively to the development and testing of innovativ concepts of library and information services; and

Whereas, research libraries, such as the major university library members of the Association of Research Libraries; independent research libraries, such as the John Crerar Library, the Huntington Library, and the Folger Library; and urban public libraries, such as the New York Public Library and the Boston Public Library, all of which serve as major national research centers because their collection and services are broadly based and recognized as having national significance; and

Whereas, resources of university and other research libraries, with collective resources of over 200 million volumes, have long been shared through a system of interlibrary lending and whereas under the existing system the costs of providing this service are becoming increasingly difficult for libraries to bear: now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Higher Education Act (HEA) of 1965 be revised and extended for three years on the following basis :

(a) Extend the Basic, Supplementary and Special Grant Program of HEA, Title II, part A, in its present form, to be funded at a minimum level not less than the amount appropriated in fiscal year 1975.

(b) Extend Title VI, part A, in its present form to be funded at a minimum level not less than the amount appropriated in fiscal year 1975.

(c) Continue the Library Training and Demonstration Programs authorized under Title II, part B, to be funded at a minimum level not less than the amount appropriated in fiscal year 1975.

(d) Replace the present HEA, Title II, part C, with a new authority to assist research libraries in accordance with the suggestion of the Carnegie Council on Higher Education. This program would strengthen and extend the capacity of research libraries collectively to provide the information services needed by the research community, as well as to serve as a national resource to all who need and desire it.

LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

The National Commission on Libraries and Information Science, firmly committed to the continuation of categorical aid as part of its national program, adopted a strongly-worded resolution calling for the revision and adoption of the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA).

The Commission cited LSCA as an effective instrument in the extension and improvement of library services to millions of Americans in the 50 states and territories and as a catalyst for the sharing of resources among public, school, university, and special libraries and information centers.

VOTE. Adopted by the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science at its meeting on September 25, 1975, in Los Angeles, California.

The views expressed are those of the NCLIS and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Executive or Legislative Branches of the Government.

Forward funding, safeguards against substituting Federal funds for state funds, and the strengthening of LSCA, Title III (Interlibrary Cooperation) are among the nine recommendations in the resolution.

RESOLUTION ON LIBRARY SERVICES AND CONSTRUCTION ACT Whereas, the Federal Library Services and Construction Act has been instrumental in extension and improvement of library services to millions of Americans in the fifty states and territories, and

Whereas, the Federal funds provided to the states and territories under this Act have encouraged the development of library services directed toward the daily information, education, research, cultural, and recreational needs of people, and

Whereas, these funds have enabled libraries to cooperate with both public and volunteer agencies in meeting the needs of disadvantaged people, persons in institutions, handicapped persons, and those of limited English-speaking ability, and to develop appropriate outreach services needed in both cities and rural areas, and

Whereas, the incentive of these Federal funds has assisted thousands of communities to secure from public and private sources the funds needed to construct library facilties adequate for today's library services, and

Whereas, interlibrary cooperation programs assisted by the Federal Library Services and Construction Act are encouraging and facilitating the sharing of resources among public, school, university, and special libraries and information centers to meet the increasingly sophisticated needs of readers, and

Whereas, the testimony of library users as well as that of librarians, library administrators, and trustees in regional meetings in 1973, 1974, and 1975 clearly indicate to the NCLIS the need for improvement in library service and for expansion of library systems and network development, and

Whereas, the 1970 amendments (Public Law 91-600) extended the Act through June 30, 1976, and

Whereas, the need for library and informaton services is accelerating: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved, That the Library Services and Construction Act (LSCA) be revised and extended for three years on the following basis :

(a) Revise the Act to ensure that Federal funds will not be substituted for state funds nor used as a substitute for adequate state support for the function of the State Library Agency. Provide a limitation on expenditures by State Library Agencies of 10 percent for administrative purposes.

(6) LSCA, Title I, funds be matched by state appropriations only.

(c) Statutory time limitation on the use of LSCA funds for the state administration of LSCA ensuring that more LSCA funds are distributed to eligible libraries.

(d) Assurance of an equitable distribution of LSCA, Title I, funds to support the strengthening of urban public libraries.

(C) Administration and fiscal provisions of LSCA to be structured to strengthen, stimulate, and require state and local support.

(f) Merger of Title III of LSCA and the multitype Library Partnership Act providing for the establishment of a local-state-Federal partnership program for the purpose of encouraging and sustaining an adequate system of libraries and for the further development of networks which extend and expand the use of the resources of school, public, academic, and special libraries and information centers.

(g) Revise LSCA to include provisions for forward funding to help resolve the recurring problems of uncertainty, late allocations, and other administrative problems which interfere with effective planning at the national, state, and local level; and be it further

Resolred, That the funding level for fiscal year 1977 for LSCA, Title I, be at a level not less than the FY 1976 appropriation : Title II at a minimum level of $9 million : Title III, including the Library Partnership Act, at a minimum level of $15 million : Title IV, Older American Services, at a minimum level of $2 million; and be it further

NOTE. Adopted by the National Commission on Libraries and Information Science at its meeting on Sept. 26, 1975), in Los Angeles, Calif.

Resolved, That there be a re-examination of the authorized level of funding and the national priorities specified in LSCA and of the requirements for effective long-range planning. The views expressed are those of the NCLS and do not necessarily reflect the position or policy of the Executive or Legislative Branches of the Government.

Mr. BRADEMAS. May I say, as one who is concerned with libraries on this committee and also as a member of the House Administration Committee, where I sit on the Subcommittee on Libraries and Memorials, I am very pleased that the question of the Madison Library has been resolved in the manner in which it was.

That is not to say that I don't think we here in the House need more space, because I think we do, but that is another subject for another day.

Thank you, Mr. Trezza.

Now we are very pleased to hear from Duane Mattheis, Executive Deputy Commissioner of Education, accompanied by Dick W. Hays, Acting Director of the Office of Libraries and Learning Resources; Mr. Robert Klassen, Chief of the Program Development and Assistance Staff of the Office of Libraries and Learning Resources; Mr. Richard A. Hastings, Deputy Assistant Secretary for Legislation, Education; and Mr. Robert Wheeler, Deputy Commissioner for the Bureau of School Systems, of the Department of HEW.

We are very pleased to have all of you.

Our friend on the subcommittee and associate, Mr. Quie, could not be here this morning. I know he would want me to extend a particular word of welcome to you, sir.

PANEL FROM THE DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH, EDUCATION, AND

WELFARE, WASHINGTON, D.C.: DUANE J. MATTHEIS, EXECUTIVE
DEPUTY COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION; DICK W. HAYS, ACTING
DIRECTOR, OFFICE OF LIBRARIES AND LEARNING RESOURCES;
ROBERT KLASSEN, CHIEF, PROGRAM DEVELOPMENT AND ASSIST-
ANCE STAFF, OFFICE OF LIBRARIES AND LEARNING RESOURCES;
RICHARD A. HASTINGS, DEPUTY ASSISTANT SECRETARY FOR
LEGISLATION, EDUCATION; AND ROBERT WHEELER, DEPUTY
COMMISSIONER FOR BUREAU OF SCHOOL SYSTEMS
Mr. MATTHEIS. Thank you very much.

Mr. Chairman, it is a pleasure to appear before your subcommittee this morning to discuss the administration's proposal for a new direction for Federal assistance to libraries. Our proposal, the Library Partnership Act, was transmitted on March 6 and is similar to S. 3944, which was introduced by Senator Javits during the 93d Congress. When the proposal was originally submitted, it was intended in part to replace the Library Services and Construction Act, which expires in fiscal year 1976 and is automatically extended for 1 year by the General Education Provisions Act, and to provide the basis for future Federal support for library service programs administered by the Office of Education.

The Administration is currently considering the Federal library program as part of the 1977 budget process. Any new position would be reflected in the President's fiscal year 1977 budget submittal. Our discussion today should be considered with that in mind.

The purpose of the original Library Services Act, enacted in 1956 and expanded in 1964 as the LSCA, was to provide Federal assistance to stimulate the States in the expansion and improvement of public library services in rural areas. In 1956, only 23 States had programs for statewide public library development. Expenditures under these programs amounted to $5 million. Rural areas suffered the most, with large segments of the population having little or no access to libraries. Twenty-six million rural residents were without any library services, and an additional 50 million citizens lived in areas with extremely inadequate service; 319 rural counties had no library services available within their confines.

Today, there are 38 States with grant-in-aid programs. Appropriations exceed $100 million; 95 percent of the population has access to some form of public library services. In addition, Federal general revenue sharing funds used for public libraries by State and local governments have increased greatly since the program was initiated, with $82.3 million being used for this purpose during fiscal year 1974.

In fiscal year 1975 the library resources appropriation of $207.8 million included not only support for public library services and interlibrary cooperative activities under the LSCA, but also support for the purchase of school and academic library materials and instructional equipment; library career training; and library de:nonstrations under the Elementary and Secondary Education Act (ESEA) and the Higher Education Act (HEA) authorities. Some of these efforts would also be combined under the proposed legislation.

Since the evidence indicates that the basic purpose of the public library legislation to stimulate the growth of library services has been achieved, we believe it is inappropriate for the Federal Government to continue a role of basic support for operation and construction. This is the responsibility of State and local governments. The proposed legislation was based on the premise that the Federal Government has a joint role with States and localities to encourage, support, and provide incentive capital for comprehensive informational services in interinstitutional cooperative patterns and to demonstrate these, as well as other related arrangements of new information delivery systems for libraries of all types.

Based on the evaluation study done under contract for the Office of Education by Systems Development Corp. entitled “The Public Library and Federal Policy" (1973), we concluded that the Nation's libraries involved in cooperative projects have successfully proven the value of cooperative local, State, and regional projects and networks in increasing services and dollar effectiveness. Let me give you a few examples, which are illustrative of this success:

LSCA title III and HEA title II-B have been instrumental in generating initial support for the Ohio College Library Center, a regional processing network, providing more than 500 academic and public libraries in 40 States access to cataloging data through 800 computer terminals. The data base includes 1.6 million records of titles from which libraries can produce their records and, in turn, save thousands of dollars in processing costs at the State and local

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