The Advancement of Learning

Pirmais vāks
Clarendon Press, 1885 - 376 lappuses
 

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Populāri fragmenti

321. lappuse - Have gloz^d, but superficially ; not much Unlike young men, whom Aristotle thought Unfit to hear moral philosophy. The reasons you allege do more conduce To the hot passion of...
101. lappuse - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it...
30. lappuse - Here therefore is the first distemper of learning, when men study words and not matter ; whereof, though I have represented an example of late times, yet it hath been and will be secundum majus et minus in all time.
8. lappuse - And for the second, certain it is, there is no vexation or anxiety of mind which resulteth from knowledge, otherwise than merely by accident; for all knowledge and wonder (which is the seed of knowledge) is an impression of pleasure in itself...
345. lappuse - It is the sinfullest thing in the world to forsake or destitute a plantation, once in forwardness : for besides the dishonour, it is the guiltiness of blood of many commiserable persons.
40. lappuse - Heraclitus gave a just censure, saying, " Men sought truth in their own " little worlds, and not in the great and common " world;" for they disdain to spell, and so by degrees to read in the volume of God's works...
vii. lappuse - Whilst he was commorant in the university, about sixteen years of age, (as his lordship hath been pleased to impart unto myself), he first fell into the dislike of the philosophy of Aristotle; not for the worthlessness of the author, to whom he would ever ascribe all high attributes, but for the unfruitfulness of the way; being a philosophy (as his lordship used to say) only strong for disputations and contentions, but barren of the production of works for the benefit of the life of man; in which...
105. lappuse - The knowledge of man is as the waters, some descending from above, and some springing from beneath ; the one informed by the light of nature, the other inspired by divine revelation.
150. lappuse - So that it was no marvel, the manner of antiquity being to consecrate inventors, that the Egyptians had so few human idols in their temples, but almost all brute. Omnigenumque Deum monstra, et latrator Anubis, Contra Neptunum, et Venerem, contraque Minervam...
334. lappuse - Therefore also said the wisdom of God, I will send them prophets and apostles, and some of them they shall slay and persecute...

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