The Influence of Anthropology on the Course of Political Science, 4. sējums,1-4. izdevums

Pirmais vāks
University of California Press, 1916 - 81 lappuses

No grāmatas satura

Lietotāju komentāri - Rakstīt atsauksmi

Ierastajās vietās neesam atraduši nevienu atsauksmi.

Atlasītās lappuses

Citi izdevumi - Skatīt visu

Bieži izmantoti vārdi un frāzes

Populāri fragmenti

30. lappuse - Though the earth and all inferior creatures be common to all men, yet every man has a property in his own person. This nobody has any right to but himself. The labour of his body, and the work of his hands, we may say, are properly his.
30. lappuse - I have named all governors of independent communities, whether they are, or are not, in league with others; for it is not every compact that puts an end to the state of nature between men, but only this one of agreeing together mutually to enter into one community and make one body politic; other promises and compacts men may make one with another and yet still be in the state of nature.
30. lappuse - The promises and bargains for truck, etc., between the two men in the desert island, mentioned by Garcilasso de la Vega, in his history of Peru, or between a Swiss and an Indian in the woods of America, are binding to them, though they are perfectly in a state of nature in reference to one another; for truth and keeping of faith belongs to men as men, and not as members of society.
31. lappuse - Thus in the beginning all the world was America, and more so than that is now; for no such thing as money was anywhere known.
31. lappuse - Thus this law of reason makes the deer that Indian's who hath killed it; it is allowed to be his goods who hath bestowed his labour upon it, though before it was the common right of every one.
31. lappuse - The fruit or venison which nourishes the wild Indian, who knows no enclosure, and is still a tenant in common, must be his, and so his — ie, a part of him, that another can no longer have any right to it before it can do him any good for the support of his life.
32. lappuse - There are great and apparent conjectures, says he, that these men, speaking of those of Peru, for a long time had neither kings nor common-wealths, but lived in troops, as they do this day in Florida, the Cheriquanas, those of Brazil, and many other nations, which have no certain kings, but as occasion is offered, in peace or war, they choose their captains as they please, 1.
24. lappuse - It may peradventure be thought there was never such a time nor condition of war as this; and I believe it was never generally so, over all the world: but there are many places where they live so now. For the savage people in many places of America (except the government of small families, the concord whereof dependeth on natural lust) have no government at all, and live at this day in that brutish manner, as I said before.
26. lappuse - Have there not been whole nations, and those of the most civilized people, amongst whom the exposing their children, and leaving them in the fields to perish by want or wild beasts, has been the practice, as little condemned or scrupled as the begetting them...
33. lappuse - Thus we see that the kings of the Indians in America, which is still a pattern of the first ages in Asia and Europe, whilst the inhabitants were too few for the country, and want of people and money gave men no temptation to enlarge their possessions of land or contest for wider extent of ground...