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EXHIBIT 203

NEGROES INCREASE
SOUTHERN EXODUS

as

| shortage of World War I, an official said, and it intensified during and after World War II.

Mechanization of Southern plantations, which once employed hundreds and even thou

sands of Negroes, is another U.S. Studies Show Majority reason not only for the exodus

to the North and West but also May Be in North by 1970

for the movement of the Negro New York Times

from the farm to the big cities December 1, 1966

in the South, itself, the official added.

Census studies noted that the WASHINGTON, Nov. 30 (AP) largest percentage increase in -American Negroes are stead- Negro population was to the ily moving out of the South to West, especially California. the North and West and, if

About 8.2 per cent of the Nepresent trends continue, the gro population lived in the majority will no longer be liv. West last year-compared with ing in the old Confederacy by 5.7 per cent in 1960." Increases 1970.

in the Northeast and North In the five years between Central states were not 1960 and 1965, more than two sharp although the over-all permillion Negroes migrated from centages were greater. the South, Census Bureau and

The bureau said 17.9 per cent Labor Department studies show. of the Negro population lived In 1960, 60 per cent of the na

in the Northeast last year tion's 18.85 million Negroes compared with 16 per cent in lived in the South. Five years

1960—while 20.2 per cent lived later, only 53.6 per cent of the in the North Central statesnation's 20.94 million Negroes compared with 18.3 per cent

in 1960. still lived below the MasonDixon line.

The Census Bureau figures also

indicated that many Negroes And like the white man before him, the Negro is begin the South but were moving

were not only migrating from ning to heed the westward call westward from the Northern more and more in his search states as well. for a better life.

The Labor Department, in The Government studies also showed that Negroes have assessing the economic and solarger families but lower in- cial position of the American comes and less schooling than Negro, said the vast majority whites. The Census Bureau of colored people are city study indicated that in general dwellers, even in the South Negroes fare better economical. where better than three out of ly and educationally outside the every five negroes live in urban South. Whites Move Farther

And about half the Negroes in

the six cities with the largest But another study showed colored populations-New York, that more whites move from Chicago, Philadelphia, Detroit, region to region than Negrocs, Washington and Los Angeles-whose change of address is were born elsewhere, chiefly in more likely to be confined to the South. the same state.

A Census Bureau study of the In its studies, the bureau Negro at mid-decade found that: didn't attempt to detail reasons gof the 4.4 million Negro why the Negro migration from families, about half lived in the the South is continuing but one South. official said it was basically a gOne of every four Negro matter of jobs.

adults had completed four years The large-scale exodus began of high school or some college during the Northern manpower but in the South the proportion

areas.

was one out of six. It was one proportionately greater than it
of three in the North and West. actually is, mainly because of

9Negro families are larger in the massive migration into the
the South than in the North and central cities, a movement ac-
West—4:56 persons compared centuated by the migration of
with 4.11 persons.

whites to the suburbs.

Actually, the 9 Negro families in the South

department have lower incomes and more

noted, the percentage of Nechildren to support than Negroes has changed little since the turn

groes in the total population in the North and West.

of the century and the greatest The Labor Department said change has been in locationthe Negro population-about 11 away from the South and farms per cent of the total-appeared into the metropolitan areas.

Senator RIBICOFF. A number of members of the press have asked whether they could chat with me about these hearings. We will take a 10-minute recess, and I will return here and be available to the press.

Senator KENNEDY. Mr. Chairman, we have a distinguished visitor in the hearing room today, Mr. Randolph Churchill, with his daughter.

(Whereupon, at 12:10 p.m., the subcommittee adjourned, subject to the call of the Chair.)

HEARINGS

BEFORE THE

SUBCOMMITTEE ON
EXECUTIVE REORGANIZATION

OF THE

COMMITTEE ON
GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS

UNITED STATES SENATE

NINETIETH CONGRESS

FIRST SESSION

APRIL 18, 1967

PART 15

Printed for the use of the Committee on Government Operations

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For sale by the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office

Washington, D.C. 20402 - Price $1.00

SENATE COMMITTEE ON GOVERNMENT OPERATIONS

JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas, Chairman HENRY M. JACKSON, Washington

KARL E. MUNDT, South Dakota SAM J. IRVIN, JR., North Carolina

CARL T. CURTIS, Nebraska ERNEST GRUENING, Alaska

JACOB K. JAVITS, New York EDMUND S. MUSKIE, Maine

CLIFFORD P. HANSEN, Wyoming ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut

HOWARD H. BAKER, JR., Tennessee FRED R. HARRIS, Oklahoma ROBERT F. KENNEDY, New York LEE METCALF, Montana JOSEPH M, MONTOYA, New Mexico

JAMES R. CALLOWAY, Chief Clerk and Staff Director

ARTHUR A. SHARP, Staf Editor

SUBCOMMITTEE ON EXECUTIVE REORGANIZATION

ABRAHAM RIBICOFF, Connecticut, Chairman JOHN L. MCCLELLAN, Arkansas

JACOB K. JAVITS, New York ERNEST GRUENING, Alaska

CLIFFORD P. HANSEN, Wyoming ROBERT F. KENNEDY, New York

HOWARD H. BAKER, JR., Tennessee
FRED R. HARRIS, Oklahoma
JOSEPH M. MONTOYA, New Mexico

PAUL DANACEAU, Staff Director
ROBERT WAGER, General Counsel

ESTHER NEWBERG, Chief Clerk
RICHARD BOWEN, Professional Staf Member

PAMELA M. PANCZAK, Staf Editor

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C. J. Haggerty, president, Building and Construction Trades Department,

AFL-CIO; accompanied by M. A. Hutcheson, president, United Brother-

hood of Carpenters and Joiners of America; Peter Fosco, secretary-

treasurer, Laborers' International Union of North America; Gordon M.

Freeman, president, International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers;

Peter T. Schoemann, president, United Association of Journeymen and

Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting Industry of the United

States and Canada; Hunter P. Wharton, president, International

Union of Operating Engineers; and Frank Bonadio, secretary-treasurer,

Building and Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO.-

EXHIBITS

No.

204. Table showing hourly wage scales and employer insurance, pension,

and vacation payments for selected building trades in 100 cities,
January 3, 1967, submitted by Mr. C. J. Haggerty, president,

Building and Construction Trades Department.

205. Article from Industrial and Labor Relations Review, “The Effects

of Unions on Efficiency in the Residential Construction Industry:

A Case Study,” by Allan B. Mandelstamm, professor, Michigan

State University, July 1965.

206. Construction Craftsman, the official publication of the Building and

Construction Trades Department, AFL-CIO, March 1967..

207. A statistical analysis of Apprenticeship Information Center activities

for the calendar year 1966, compiled by the Department of Labor,

submitted by Mr. C. J. Haggerty

208. Excerpts from a report to the Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation

and Research of the Manpower Administration of the Department

of Labor, "Negro Participation in Apprenticeship Programs,” by

F. Ray Marshall, project director and professor, University of

Texas, December 1966..

209. Bills introducted by Senator Jacob Javits relating to housing and

rehabilitation, S. 1198–1201, submitted for the record by Senator

Javits...

210. Article from the United Association Journal, "How About It?" by

Peter T. Schoemann, general president, United Association of
Journeymen and Apprentices of the Plumbing and Pipefitting

Industry of the United States and Canada, April 1965.--

211. Telegrams from the Painters Union District Council of New York

and the Carpenters Union District Council of New York, concern-

ing instant rehabilitation in New York, received by Senator

Ribicoff, April 15, 1967...

212. Information concerning nonwhite participation in selected building

trades unions and apprenticeship programs in several U.S. cities,

from "Negro Participation in Apprenticeship Programs,

to the Office of Manpower Policy, Evaluation and Research of the

Manpower Administration of the Department of Labor, by F. Ray

Marshall

, project director, and Vernon M. Briggs, Jr., associate

project director, December 1966..

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