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U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 16, 1965.
Hon. John L. McCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Larsen of Monmouth, Oregon, with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 16, 1965.
Mr. and Mrs. FREDRICK LARSEN,
Monmouth, Oreg.

DEAR FRIENDS: I very much appreciated receiving your letter of July 7, 1965 with respect to S. 1006.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bring. ing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

MONMOUTH, OREG., July 7, 1965. Senator WAYNE MORSE, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MORSE: This letter concerns our reaction to Congress' consideration to change the copyright laws. This copyright bill was introduced into both houses on February 5, 1965 (S. 1006).

As teachers we must totally reject the proposals contained in this bill. Millions of dollars are being spent each year to upgrade the education of our children. Study groups from public schools and universities work to formulate instructional methods. And audio-visual departments of schools attempt to supply the necessary teaching tools. But this copyright bill would eliminate all chances of reaching that high level of instruction that educators and responsible political leaders have been seeking.

If a teacher cannot make overhead transparencies or otherwise copy maps, charts, pictures, or experiments he will be greatly hampered in his attempts to teach. Consider the geography teacher who has one small copy of a map which would be very beneficial for a particular unit of work; yet he cannot make a copy to blow up on a screen for the whole class to see. Or a science teacher with an excellent experiment but only one copy. Can you imagine 40 students trying to read from one page? It's ridiculous. But under the new copyright bill that is what teachers will have to do, for they cannot copy a single thing.

Consequently, this bill will greatly restrict a teachers ability to teach and will retard the education of children. We hope that you will make every effort to prevent its passage. Sincerely,

Mr. & Mrs. FREDRICK LARSEN.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON INTERIOR AND INSULAR AFFAIRS,

August 4, 1965.
Hon. JOHN L. McCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.O. DEAR JOHN: Enclosed is a copy of a letter I received from a school superintendent in Utah, asking that his views on the copyright bill be made a part of the Subcommittee hearings. I would appreciate it if you would do so. Sincerely,

FRANK E. Moss.

MILLARD SCHOOL DISTRICT,
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION,

Fillmore, Utah, July 19, 1965.
Hon. FRANK E. Moss,
U.S. Senator,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. Moss: Testimony before Subcommittee #3 of the House Judiciary Committee shows that an ad hoc committee of educational groups is clearly asking for free use of copyrighted materials in the classroom.

As an educator, it is my belief that such free use by means of photocopying would deprive authors of incentive to write and of publishers to publish.

I oppose any provisions in the copyright law which would permit free reproduction of copyrighted materials for educational use. I ask that this letter be made part of the record of the Subcommittee. Sincerely yours,

VERMON S. BARNEY, Superintendent,

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 9, 1965.
Hon. John L. MOCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Professor Charles P. Schleicher of the University of Oregon with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 9, 1965.
Prof. CHARLES P. SCHLEICHER,
Department of Political Science,
University of Oregon, Eugene, Oreg.

DEAR PROFESSOR SCHLEICHER: Thank you for bringing to my attention a copy of your July 28, 1965 letter to Representative Willis with respect to H.R. 4347.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON,
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE,

Eugene, Oreg., July 28, 1965.
Hon. EDWIN WILLIS,
House of Representatives,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR: Some proposals for amending H.R. 4347 to allow free reproduction of copyrighted materials for educational use seems to me to be contrary to the public interest. As an educator, although I can see some short-run advantages to be gained, in the long-run there would be a tendency to dry up the source. The monetary incentive to write such materials is certainly not very great; to reduce prospective income, as such changes would surely do, would decrease the amount of material published.

For these reasons I oppose any changes in the present "fair use" doctrine such as that to permit free use for educational purposes of copyrighted material. I request that this letter be made a part of the record of the Subcommittee No. 3 of the Judiciary committee. Sincerely yours,

CHARLES P. SCHLEICHER,
Professor of Political Science.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 13, 1965.
Hon. Join L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR MCCLELLAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Dr. David D. DeWeese of the University of Oregon with respect to copyright legislation which is being considered by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 13, 1965.
DAVID D. DEWEESE, M.D.,
Professor and Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oregon

Medical School, Portland, Oreg. DEAR DR. DEWEESE: Thank you for bringing to my attention a copy of your July 27, 1965 letter to Representative Willis with respect to H.R. 4347.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON MEDICAL SCHOOL,

DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY,

Portland, Oreg., July 27, 1965. Hon. EDWIN WILLIS, Chairman, Committee on Judiciary, Subcommittee No. 3, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. WILLIS: It has been called to my attention that a Bill is being considered in your committee (Subcommittee No. 3 of the House Judiciary Committee) regarding the free use of copyrighted material for educational purposes.

While I am in no way associated with the publishing of written material in any field except from the point of view of an author, I cannot help but feel that this would be infringement upon the rights of publishers. From a perfectly practical point of view, one of two things happens. Either I desire to write something of an educational nature, or a publishing house asks if I would be willing to write such an educational book or monograph. In either event, after an agreement is reached I go to certain mechanics of collecting material, illustrations, photographs, original drawings, and original writing. The implied purpose of this is to educate others. The publisher, regardless of who it is, agrees to proof-read my material, suggest certain corrections, compile the manuscript in book form, arrange the photographs and drawings, type-set in, send it back for my approval, advertise it, promote it, for the express purpose of realizing a profit. While the publisher's motive may be that of profit, the motive of the author is usually that of education. For this the author receives a royalty which varies from publisher to publisher but is fairly standard.

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Such material produced by me as an author is then distributed to those who wish to purchase it. I am sure that in many instances such material is copied by photostatic processes and used in individual classrooms, etc. to great advantage. However, the copying and reproduction of this material, of any part of it, in other writing or in any extensive lecturing or series of lectures, certainly deserves credit both to the publisher and to the author and if required, payment for such reproduction.

As an educator I can see no reason why unlimited right to reproduce this type of thing should be allowed. In my opinion the publisher has a right to his profit since he has done the majority of the work on the publication, except for the actual writing of the material. To allow free and total use of all of it under the guise of the need of education for this, is, in my opinion, a subterfuge. There are really few restrictions upon using published material for the teaching of individual classes with or without permission. In my opinion, the changing of a law to allow unlimited copying would lead to considerable plagiarism and certainly would eventually lead to the destruction of certain publishing houses with the concentration of educational publishing in certain houses who would "play the game".

I strongly urge you to carefully consider this situation before any decision is made. Sincerely,

DAVID D. DEWEESE, M.D.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

June 30, 1965.
Hon. John L. MOCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR MCCLELLAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Mr. Carl L. Anderson of Corvallis, Oregon, with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing this letter to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondent in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE. Enclosure.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

June 30, 1965.
Mr. CARL L. ANDERSON,
Corvallis, Oreg.

DEAR MR. ANDERSON : I very much appreciated receiving your letter of June 25, 1965, with respect to S. 1006.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE, Chairman, Education Subcommittee.

CORVALLIS, OREG., June 25, 1965. Hon. WAYNE L. MORSE, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MORSE: I will introduce myself as an educator and an author expressing views on the copyright law of 1909 which is now before Congress and undergoing revision. It is my opinion that Section 107 of the bill presently before Congress which deals with fair use should be retained. This section reads, “Notwithstanding the provisions of Section 106 the fair use of copyrighted work is not an infringement of copyright.” As interpreted by the courts this provision has served both educators and authors. It has permitted teachers to use published materials without permitting a wholesale free duplication of textbook material. The proposal of some education groups to substitute for the fair use provision of Section 107 the free use of copyrighted materials would remove much of the incentive for authors to write textbooks for classroom use. The free use of copyrighted materials would be equivalent to using the services of authors without any compensation to the person who labored for years and used his background and talents to produce a textbook.

The provisions of Section 107 of the bill presently before Congress have worked effectively in terms of educational use and have protected the author and publisher against unlimited use of copyrighted materials. I sincerely hope you will have sufficient time to give this matter thorough study. Sincerely,

CARL L. ANDERSON.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

June 23, 1965.
Hon. John L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN : I am bringing to your attention a letter I have just received from Professor Ronald J. Glossop of the Portland State College, with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing this letter to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards. Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE. Enclosure.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

June 23, 1965.
Prof. RONALD J. GLOSSOP,
Division of Humanities, Department of Philosophy, Portland State College,

Portland, Oreg. DEAR PROFESSOR GLOSSOP: I very much appreciated receiving your good letter of June 15, 1965 concerning S. 1006.

Since I know the view which you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards. Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

PORTLAND STATE COLLEGE,

Portland, Oreg., June 15, 1965. Hon. WAYNE MORSE, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MORSE: I write to you not only because you are a senator from Oregon but also because you are a proven friend of higher education. I have recently learned that a new copyright bill, Bill S. 1006, has been introduced in

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