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U.S. SENATE,

Washington, D.C., July 28, 1965. Hon. JAMES O. EASTLAND, Chairman, Judiciary Committee, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR JIM: Will you please make the enclosed letter a part of the record of the hearings on copyright legislation. Sincerely,

WALLACE F. BENNETT.

MILLARD SCHOOL DISTRICT,

OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION,

Fillmore, Utah, July 19, 1965. Hon. WALLACE F. BENNETT, U.S. Senator, Washington, D.O.

DEAR MR. BENNETT : Testimony before Subcommittee #3 of the House Judiciary Committee shows that an ad hoc committee of educational groups is clearly asking for free use of copyrighted materials in the classroom.

As an educator, it is my belief that such free use by means of photocopying would deprive authors of incentive to write and of publishers to publish.

I oppose any provisions in the copyright law which would permit free reproduction of copyrighted materials for educational use. I ask that this letter be made part of the record of the Subcommittee. Sincerely yours,

VERMON S. BARNEY, Superintendent.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON THE JUDICIARY,
SUBCOMMITTEE ON REVISION AND CODIFICATION,

August 3, 1965.
Hon. JOHN L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Senate $ubcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Senate

Office Building, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: Enclosed is copy of a letter to Representative Willis from Dr. Edwin J. Stringham, of Chapel Hill, North Carolina.

Dr. Stringham is an English scholar and writer, and I would greatly appreciate your including his letter in the record of hearings which you will shortly open on S. 1006. I have Dr. Stringham's permission to make this request. With all kind wishes, I am Sincerely yours,

SAM J. ERVIN, JR.

CHAPEL HILL, N.C., July 27, 1965. Hon. EDWIN E. WILLIS, House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. WILLIS: Testimony before Subcommittee #3 of the House Judiciary Committee shows that an ad hoc committee of educational groups is clearly asking for free use of copyrighted materials in the classroom.

I have been in the field of education for some fifty years, holding professorships at Teacher's College, Columbia University, The Juillard, Queen's College, New York City, University of California, University of Texas, etc. During these years I have authored, co-authored or edited over twenty books for High School and College use. Never have I heard of a proposition so destructive to education in the U.S.A. as that of the ad hoc committee which is asking for unrestricted, free copying and “free use" of copyrighted materials.

If this idea is adopted in proposed bill (H.R. 4347) revising the copyright law of 1909, there would be no incentive whatever for authors and educators with new ideas that have been tested and proven of value to publish their findings. Without proper remuneration and copyright protection no educator is going to go through the ordeal of writing a book. As a result education, as a whole, would become sterile, out-moded and static. How any thinking person would suggest such an unjust use of copyrighted material is, to me, simply incredible.

The adoption of the idea presented by the ad hoc committee would bring undue hardship to retired professors who rely on royalties from books written in their active period for their livelihood. I strong urge this letter be made part of the record of the Subcommittee. Sincerely yours,

EDWIN J. STRINGHAM.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 15, 1965.
Hon. John L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Dr. R. E. Lieuallen, Chancellor of the Oregon State System of Higher Education, with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing this letter to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 15, 1965.
Dr. R. E. LIEUALLEN,
Chancellor, Oregon State System of Higher Education,
Eugene, Oreg.

DEAR DR. LIEUALLEN : I very much appreciated receiving your letter of June 28, 1965, with respect to S. 1006.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

OREGON STATE SYSTEM OF HIGHER EDUCATION,

OFFICE OF THE CHANCELLOR,

EUGENE, OREG., June 28, 1965. Hon. WAYNE MORSE, U.S. Senator, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.O.

DEAR SENATOR MORSE: I would like to voice our support for the positions expressed by the ad hoc education committee on H.R. 4347-S. 1006 “Copyrights." Restrictions in this bill placed upon classroom teachers with regard to the ready availability of teaching resources would have a detrimental effect on instruction.

Over and above the positions expressed by the ad hoc committee, we are concerned over removal of the “not-for-profit” clause in the proposed legislation. Operation of our educational radio and television networks in Oregon would be seriously impaired if it becomes necessary to pay fees and clearance costs for any use of a non-dramatic or musical work, or excerpts from other copyrighted ma. terial.

Encumbrances placed in the way of efficient use of recording devices for repeat and exchange of broadcasts also would be extremely disadvantageous.

We certainly recognize the necessity of protecting the interests of copyright owners, but we feel that the proposed legislation in its present form would prove to be detrimental to the educational process, and not in the public interest. Cordially yours,

R. E. LIEUALLEN, Chancellor.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 16, 1965.
Hon. John L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Mr. and Mrs. Fredrick Larsen of Monmouth, Oregon, with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

July 16, 1965.
Mr. and Mrs. FREDRICK LARSEN,
Monmouth, Oreg.

DEAR FRIENDS : I very much appreciated receiving your letter of July 7, 1965 with respect to S. 1006.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

MONMOUTH, OREG., July 7, 1965. Senator WAYNE MORSE, Senate Office Building, Washington, D.C.

DEAR SENATOR MORSE: This letter concerns our reaction to Congress' consideration to change the copyright laws. This copyright bill was introduced into both houses on February 5, 1965 (S. 1006).

As teachers wé must totally reject the proposals contained in this bill. Millions of dollars are being spent each year to upgrade the education of our children. Study groups from public schools and universities work to formulate instructional methods. And audio-visual departments of schools attempt to supply the necessary teaching tools. But this copyright bill would eliminate all chances of reaching that high level of instruction that educators and responsible political leaders have been seeking.

If a teacher cannot make overhead transparencies or otherwise copy maps, charts, pictures, or experiments he will be greatly hampered in his attempts to teach. Consider the geography teacher who has one small copy of a map which would be very beneficial for a particular unit of work; yet he cannot make a copy to blow up on a screen for the whole class to see. Or a science teacher with an excellent experiment but only one copy. Can you imagine 40 students trying to read from one page? It's ridiculous. But under the new copyright bill that is what teachers will have to do, for they cannot copy a single thing.

Consequently, this bill will greatly restrict a teachers ability to teach and will retard the education of children. We hope that you will make every effort to prevent its passage. Sincerely,

Mr. & Mrs. FREDRICK LARSEN.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON INTERIOR AND INSULAR AFFAIRS,

August 4, 1965.
Hon. JOHN L. McCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.O. DEAR JOHN: Enclosed is a copy of a letter I received from a school superintendent in Utah, asking that his views on the copyright bill be made a part of the Subcommittee hearings. I would appreciate it if you would do so. Sincerely,

FRANK E. Moss.

MILLARD SCHOOL DISTRICT,
OFFICE OF ADMINISTRATION,

Fillmore, Utah, July 19, 1965.
Hon. FRANK E. Moss,
U.S. Senator,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. Moss: Testimony before Subcommittee #3 of the House Judiciary Committee shows that an ad hoc committee of educational groups is clearly asking for free use of copyrighted materials in the classroom.

As an educator, it is my belief that such free use by means of photocopying would deprive authors of incentive to write and of publishers to publish.

I oppose any provisions in the copyright law which would permit free reproduction of copyrighted materials for educational use. I ask that this letter be made part of the record of the Subcommittee. Sincerely yours,

VERMON S. BARNEY, Superintendent,

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 9, 1965.
Hon. John L. MOCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks, and copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR MR. CHAIRMAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Professor Charles P. Schleicher of the University of Oregon with respect to copyright legislation which is under consideration by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 9, 1965.
Prof. CHARLES P. SCHLEICHER,
Department of Political Science,
University of Oregon, Eugene, Oreg.

DEAR PROFESSOR SCHLEICHER: Thank you for bringing to my attention a copy of your July 28, 1965 letter to Representative Willis with respect to H.R. 4347.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON,
DEPARTMENT OF POLITICAL SCIENCE,

Eugene, Oreg., July 28, 1965.
Hon. EDWIN WILLIS,
House of Representatives,
Washington, D.C.

DEAR SIR: Some proposals for amending H.R. 4347 to allow free reproduction of copyrighted materials for educational use seems to me to be contrary to the public interest. As an educator, although I can see some short-run advantages to be gained, in the long-run there would be a tendency to dry up the source. The monetary incentive to write such materials is certainly not very great; to reduce prospective income, as such changes would surely do, would decrease the amount of material published.

For these reasons I oppose any changes in the present "fair use" doctrine such as that to permit free use for educational purposes of copyrighted material. I request that this letter be made a part of the record of the Subcommittee No. 3 of the Judiciary committee. Sincerely yours,

CHARLES P. SCHLEICHER,
Professor of Political Science.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 13, 1965.
Hon. Join L. MCCLELLAN,
Chairman, Subcommittee on Patents, Trademarks and Copyrights, Judiciary

Committee, U.S. Senate, Washington, D.C. DEAR SENATOR MCCLELLAN: I am bringing to your attention a letter I have received from Dr. David D. DeWeese of the University of Oregon with respect to copyright legislation which is being considered by your subcommittee.

I will greatly appreciate your courtesy in bringing it to the attention of your colleagues through inclusion of the correspondence in your hearings record on the bill. With kindest regards, Cordially,

WAYNE MORSE.

U.S. SENATE,
COMMITTEE ON LABOR AND PUBLIC WELFARE,

August 13, 1965.
DAVID D. DEWEESE, M.D.,
Professor and Chairman, Department of Otolaryngology, University of Oregon

Medical School, Portland, Oreg. DEAR DR. DEWEESE: Thank you for bringing to my attention a copy of your July 27, 1965 letter to Representative Willis with respect to H.R. 4347.

Since I know the view you hold is one which is shared by a great many educators, I thought you would like to know that I have taken the liberty of bringing it to the attention of Senator McClellan so that it may be available to the members of his committee in their consideration of the legislation. With kindest regards, Sincerely,

WAYNE MORSE.

UNIVERSITY OF OREGON MEDICAL SCHOOL,

DEPARTMENT OF OTOLARYNGOLOGY,

Portland, Oreg., July 27, 1965. Hon. EDWIN WILLIS, Chairman, Committee on Judiciary, Subcommittee No. 3, U.S. House of Representatives, Washington, D.C.

DEAR MR. WILLIS: It has been called to my attention that a Bill is being considered in your committee (Subcommittee No. 3 of the House Judiciary Committee) regarding the free use of copyrighted material for educational purposes.

While I am in no way associated with the publishing of written material in any field except from the point of view of an author, I cannot help but feel that this would be infringement upon the rights of publishers. From a perfectly

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