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Architect of the Capitol (Except Senate items).
Botanic Garden.
Congressional Budget Office.
Copyright Royalty Tribunal.
General Accounting Office.
Government Printing Office.
John C. Stennis Center.

Library of Congress: Congressional Research Service; National Film Preservation Board.

Office of Technology Assessment.
United States Capitol Preservation Commission.

CONGRESSIONAL OPERATIONS
Mr. PACKARD. The budget that we are going to consider in this
subcommittee totals $2.1 billion. The total does not include the
Senate items. That will be considered by that body.

The portion of this budget that will be considered by this subcommittee, $1.2 billion, is for congressional operations only. That encompasses the House, the joint committees, the Capitol Police, and a few other small House/Senate entities, and then there are the Congressional Budget Office, the Office of Technology Assessment, the Architect of the Capitol, the Congressional Research Service, and Congressional Printing.

The balance of the funds requested, which total $836 million, approximately, will support statutory and administrative activities of the Legislative Branch that are performed for the Executive Branch and for the public at large.

These activities include such agencies as the Library of Congress, Superintendent of Documents, the Botanic Gardens, the Copyright Office, the Books for the Blind and Physically Handicapped Program, and the General Accounting Office.

As you see, Charles Taylor, whom we have already introduced by listing all the Members, has arrived, and we are grateful for him being with us.

We also have Mr. Thornton. It is a pleasure to have you with us also.

Mr. THORNTON. Pleasure to be with you.

Mr. PACKARD. Now we have more than one Member to start this meeting. There is also a Government Printing Office revolving fund, and that is the method the GPO uses to provide printing services for the entire Federal Government. That is almost $1 billion that is not scored against this bill, because it is derived from charges and revenues from other agency appropriations.

The actual level of operations covered by the agencies in this legislative bill, therefore, is not $2.1 billion but over $3.8 billion estimated for fiscal year 1996. So the sum and scope of these activities are much larger than most would realize.

SUBCOMMITTEE FY 1996 THEME As we go through these hearings, which begin today, we will review each request carefully and ask whether or not it is essential to this is very important, ladies and gentlemen, this is going to be the central theme of this subcommittee we will be asking, as we review the budget submittal by each of the agencies in our jurisdiction, whether the activities that they are proposing are absolutely essential to the function of their agency, and if it is essential to government service.

Can it be cut back? Can it be eliminated? Is there duplication with other agencies? These are crucial questions that I think you will see as a constant theme moving through our hearings.

Two weeks ago we had the first joint hearing with the House and Senate legislative subcommittees ever held. We had a number of witnesses testify on how we might downsize or right-size legislative agencies. I know that many of these ideas will surface again as we proceed through these hearings.

Some of them were very good proposals, and we want to get the thinking of the agencies and the management of the agencies in regard to some of those thoughts. Their point of view will be valuable input to the Members of this subcommittee.

SIGNIFICANT BUDGET CHANGES ANTICIPATED In any case, there will be significant changes in the budgets that will be presented to the committee. Because of the deadlines imposed in formulating the Federal budget, many of the funding requests reflected the plans of the 103rd Congress.

Many of the agencies, as they have prepared their budgets, based their budget proposals on the experience of last Congress, and those budgets that were prepared, in many instances, will be submitted. But there will be changes, because this is a new Congress, and many of the fundamentals will be different than they were before the November 8th election.

So the Committee will review these legislative budget proposals with great interest, recognizing that there will be perhaps some substantial changes from the submittals that will be made to us.

Again, we are grateful to have each of you here. Although this is a small room, it does create a very good atmosphere to hold the kind of hearings we hold on this subcommittee.

Again, we are pleased to have Mr. Thornton with us.
Do you have a statement, Mr. Thornton?

EFFICIENCY VS. EFFECTIVENESS
Mr. THORNTON. Mr. Chairman, I will be very brief.

I want to echo some of the thoughts you have expressed in your statement. This is a great opportunity for the Legislative Branch to set an example for other entities of government as to how we can best do the job that is set for us in an effective and efficient way.

I think it is important in making that case to recognize Peter Drucker's distinction between effectiveness and efficiency. Peter Drucker said efficiency is doing things right; effectiveness is doing right things.

And the thing that we need to do is to discover how you can help us do things right for the American people. This does not necessarily mean that we might eliminate a function just to save money if it will cost the people more in terms of effectiveness in government.

And I do think we have a great opportunity, Mr. Chairman, to set an example for other entities of government. I look forward to these hearings.

Mr. PACKARD. I appreciate very much your comments, Mr. Thornton.

I agree that we are not going to be cutting simply for cutting's sake; if it does not have some underlying beneficial effects upon the way we operate here, then it probably is not wise.

Mr. THORNTON. Yes, sir. Mr. PACKARD. Mr. Taylor, do you have a statement you would like to make?

Mr. TAYLOR. Lay on, MacDuff.
Thank you, Mr. Chairman.
Mr. PACKARD. Thank you very much.

When Mr. Fazio arrives, I would like to hear his statement, SO

Mr. THORNTON. He told me he would be a bit late and asked me to be here.

Mr. PACKARD. We will interrupt at an appropriate place in the hearing to recognize him when he arrives.

WEDNESDAY, FEBRUARY 15, 1995.

U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

WITNESSES SCOT M. FAULKNER, CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER, OFFICE OF

THE CHIEF ADMINISTRATIVE OFFICER OF THE HOUSE THOMAS E. ANFINSON, ASSOCIATE ADMINISTRATOR, OFFICE OF FI.

NANCE HON. ROBIN H. CARLE, CLERK, OFFICE OF THE CLERK LINDA G. NAVE, DEPUTY CLERK HON. WILSON S. LIVINGOOD, SERGEANT AT ARMS, OFFICE OF THE

SERGEANT AT ARMS JIM VAREY, DEPUTY SERGEANT AT ARMS BILL SIMS, SUPERVISOR OF CHAMBER SECURITY JOHN W. LAINHART I, INSPECTOR GENERAL, OFFICE OF THE IN

SPECTOR GENERAL
EDWARD F. WILLETT, JR., OFFICE OF THE LAW REVISION COUNSEL
DR. JOHN F. EISOLD, ATTENDING PHYSICIAN, OFFICE OF THE AT-

TENDING PHYSICIAN
DAVID E. MEADE, OFFICE OF LEGISLATIVE COUNSEL

Mr. PACKARD. We are very pleased to have with us now the Chief Administrative Officer of the House, Mr. Scot Faulkner. This is a new position, and I must say that I have never seen a person accept an assignment and really move forward with that huge assignment like Mr. Faulkner has. I have been very impressed with the beginning, and I am very encouraged with what I see in the future coming from our Administrative Officer as well as those that are working with him.

With him we have Mr. Don Mutersbaugh, the Director of HIS. We also have Tom Anfinson, a friend of mine from some time back, who is the Associate Administrator and supervises the Office of Finance for the Congress. We are very pleased to have these three gentlemen here.

We would like to have an opening statement from Mr. Scot Faulkner, our Chief Administrative Officer. Then, during his presentation of the budget, I would invite the Members of the subcommittee to ask questions as we proceed through it. And I think it would be – I have no objections to breaking in, if you don't, Mr. Faulkner, and asking questions on each segment of the budget submission as we go rather than waiting until the end.

So we will follow a little bit more informal process, with your permission, Mr. Faulkner. Then we will call others to join Mr. Faulkner at the table as the hearing proceeds.

With that in mind, now we will be very pleased to have your opening remarks, Mr. Faulkner, and you can summarize them or you can present them in any way you wish. Mr. FAULKNER. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

[The biography of Mr. Faulkner follows:)

SCOT M. FAULKNER Scot M. Faulkner is an executive with over twenty years experience in leading successful teams and organizations in both the private and public sectors. He is for. merly the managing partner of the Farragut Management Institute, a firm which specialized in management training and consulting with government, association, and education clients.

Mr. Faulkner is a former Vice President of Philip Crosby Associates, Inc., the world's largest quality management firm. He served as advisor and lead consultant to 24 clients. He also taught at the Crosby Quality College in both Princeton, NJ and Winter Park, FL. Mr. Faulkner has published numerous articles and workbooks on customer service, quality management, and continuous improvement.

During his career Mr. Faulkner taught and worked with numerous corporations including Marriott, Blue Cross & Blue Shield, Bell Atlantic, and Prudential. He has also designed, led, and advised on reform efforts with major associations, including the Independent Insurance Agents of America, the American Productivity and Inventory Control Society, and the Chemical Manufacturers Association. Mr. Faulkner has taught management courses for the U.S. Office of Personnel Management and the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Graduate School. He serves on the adjunct faculty at the University of Maryland's College of Business and Management.

Prior to his consulting career, Mr. Faulkner held senior management positions in the Federal Government. He is a leading expert on performance measurement, personnel, and organizational change. His Federal experience includes management po sitions at the White House, the General Services Administration, and the Department of Education. In addition, he held executive appointments as Peace Corps Country Director in Malawi, Africa, and as Director of Congressional Affairs for the Federal Aviation Administration.

Before entering the Executive Branch, Mr. Faulkner earned a Bachelors Degree from Lawrence University and a Masters in Public Administration from American University. He also served for five years as a Legislative Assistant in the U.S. Congress and with congressional Field Staff.

His accomplishments have been recognized with fifteen management awards, including three letters of commendation from the President of the United States, and five international commendations. Mr. Faulkner is a member of the American Society for Quality Control and the American Society of Association Executives.

Mr. PACKARD. I might mention before we begin that all statements, ladies and gentlemen, of all witnesses will be entered into the record, so we won't go through that format each time.

MR. FAULKNER'S OPENING STATEMENT Mr. FAULKNER. Thank you.

I am pleased and honored to appear before you today as Chief Administrative Officer of the House of Representatives. As you know, the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer was established in House Resolution 1, which also designated certain entities that would be combined under this directorate.

I also wanted to take this opportunity to thank the Clerk of the House and the Sergeant at Arms and their staffs for their assistance and courtesy during this very complex period of restructuring these House support functions.

The fiscal year 1996 budget numbers represented herein reflect requests proposed during the 103rd Congress. They do not reflect the recent reorganization activities of the 104th nor the reform initiatives being considered.

Prior to markup, revised fiscal year budget numbers reflecting the restructuring and reforms of the 104th Congress will be submitted to you and the subcommittee Members. When the House of ficers and other key witnesses appear, they will present testimony and answer your questions as they come up.

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