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122 X 15 Brief

1334 X 1672

Foolscap 1372 x 17 14 X 17 14 to 20 lbs. Crown

15 X 19
20 and 22
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1574 X 19 Demy. 16 X 21 20 to 30

1572 x 20 copy or Draft 16 x 20 56 and 60

Large Post 1634 X 20% Folio.

17 x 22 14 to 28 Double Foolscap 17 28

28 to 40 Medium.

18
23 24 to 40

1772 x 22 18 X 46

78 and 80 Royal. . 19 24 20 to 44

19

X 24 Super Royal . 20 28

54

19 X 27 Double Crown

30

44 Double Demy 21 32-33 56 and 60 Imperial 23 31 72

22 Double Folio. 22 34 32 to 48

65 Elephant. 23 28

65 Colombier 23 34 80

123%2 X 34% Double Medium 23 36 72 and 8o Double Royal

38

88 Atlas 26 33 100

126

34 Double Elephant 27 40

125

12674

40 Antiquarian 31 X 53

200

31 53 Emperor. 48 X 60

600

148

72

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* In the foregoing table the leaders denote that the same name is used in Great Britain.

In the United States printing-papers are designated by their respective sizes ; in Great Britain formerly they were designated by names, but lately the American practise has been substituted. In the following table only stock sizes and weights are recorded.

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XIII

ON MAKING UP A BOOK

EVERY author should be familiar with the process followed in making up or arranging into pages type matter that has been set, so as to know how the pages of a book should be correctly laid out. The practise usually followed is to begin the book with (1) a half-title (sometimes called " bastard title"), printed on the right-hand side of a leaf, or first page of the book-(2) the left-hand side (or second page) of which should be blank. This blank page is followed by a full title (3) printed on the right-hand side of the second leaf, or third page of the book. On the reverse side of this leaf, or fourth page of the book, the notice of copyright (4) should be printed. If the work set has a dedication (5) this usually follows, and is printed on the righthand side of the third leaf, or fifth page of the book; the left-hand side of this leaf, or sixth page of the book, should be blank. Where no dedication is inserted, the preface (6) follows the page containing notice of copyright, and is usually allowed to make as many pages as the author deems necessary, but effort is generally made to bring it to a close on a left-hand page, so that the list of contents (7) may begin on a right-hand page.

The list of contents is followed next in order by a list of illustrations (8) if the book is illustrated ; by the text (9) or main body of the book; by the appendix (10), if there be necessity for one; and, finally, by the index (11)an indispensable pass-key to every good book.

Some authors, especially those who write on scientific subjects, find it necessary to print a list of the errata that they discover in their own work after it has been passed finally for the press.

In such cases it is better that the errata should face the first page of the text of the book, and, if necessary, be printed on a separate fullsized sheet. Small inset slips should be avoided as likely to be torn out.

Authors will note that at the bottom of certain pages of printed matter-as, for example, every eighth, sixteenth, or thirty-second page-there is printed a symbol, which may be either a letter or number (numbers are most commonly used). This symbol designates a signature, or completed form, or sheet of a work, and serves as a guide to the pressman in imposing the book, to the folder, and to the collator in preparing the different sheets or signatures for the binder.

a

XIV

ILLUSTRATIONS

IN forwarding material to be used for illustrative purposes, whether it consists of photographs, drawings, paintings, etc., authors should exercise more than ordinary care in protecting them from all chances of damage and to keep them flat. As has already been pointed out (page 5), a complete list of the illustrations that are to be inserted in the text of a book should accompany the manuscript when this is despatched to the publisher. Instructions marked on the manuscript concerning the placing of these illustrations are useful only to indicate where they are to be put when the originals are supplied by the author. If the designs are to be made by the publisher's artists, duplicate proofs of these designs, when the cuts have been made, are usually sent to the author. The first should be pasted on the margin of the author's corrected galley-proof before he returns it to the printer, and a legend for each illustration should be sup

a plied. Another but less satisfactory way of in

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