Addresses and Statements by the Honorable Cordell Hull, Secretary of State of the United States of America: In Connection with His Trip to South America to Attend the International Conference for the Maintenance of Peace Held at Buenos Aires, Argentina, December 1-23, 1936

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U.S. Government Printing Office, 1937 - 91 lappuses
 

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84. lappuse - The recognition that every war or threat of war affects directly or indirectly all civilized peoples, and endangers the great principles of liberty and justice which constitute the American ideal and the standard of American international policy...
9. lappuse - While carefully avoiding any political entanglements, my Government strives at all times to co-operate with other nations to every practical extent in support of peace objectives, including reduction or limitation of armaments, the control of traffic in arms, taking the profits out of war, and the restoration of fair and friendly economic relationships. We reject war as a method of settling international disputes and favour such methods as conference, conciliation, and arbitration.
11. lappuse - decent respect to the opinions of mankind", public opinion has controlled foreign policy in all democracies. It is, therefore, all-important that every platform, every pulpit, and every forum should become constant and active agencies in the great work of education and organization. The limited extent of such highly organized and intelligent public opinion in support of peace is by far the largest draw-back to any plan to prevent war. Truly the first step is that each nation must thus make itself...
34. lappuse - DECEMBER 23, 1936 Mr. President and Members of the Conference: Today this conference for the maintenance of peace holds its last session. Before it adjourns, let me review briefly the major events and actions. One point stands out boldly. No such conference could have had any measure of real success had it not been approached in the spirit with which each of the twenty-one delegations has approached this one — a spirit of good will and common determination to consolidate the pattern of peace. The...
42. lappuse - Those who sit in the masters' seats and shape the destinies of other men are under the most imperative of mandates to leave no course which may avoid war unexplored. The real patriots and the real heroes of the future will be the leaders who find and follow the road to peace.
13. lappuse - Santiago in 1923. The second is the Treaty for the Renunciation of War, known as the Kellogg-Briand Pact, or the Pact of Paris, signed at Paris in 1928. The third is the General Convention of InterAmerican Conciliation, signed at Washington in 1929. The fourth is the General Treaty of InterAmerican Arbitration, signed at Washington in 1929. The fifth is the Anti-War Treaty of Nonaggression and Conciliation, signed at Rio de Janeiro in 1933. While the Montevideo Conference in 1933 went on record in...
11. lappuse - We have artists and poets who can distil their needed knowledge into trenchant phrase and line; they have work to do. Our great journals on both continents cover the world. Our women are awake; our youth sentient; our clubs and organizations make opinion everywhere. There is a strength here available greater than that of armies. We have but to ask its aid; it will be swift to answer, not only here but in continents beyond the seas.
5. lappuse - Aires utters this hemisphere's common voice of its interest in, nay, its intense concern over, the determination of this momentous question. The repercussions of wars and preparations for wars have been so universally disastrous that it is now as plain as mathematical truth that each nation in any part of the world is concerned in peace in every part of the world.
36. lappuse - ... the peace of the continent, and upon the maintenance of the fundamental principles of international law upon which the stability of the international order is dependent. We believe this public opinion to be more than a passive element in the life of our peoples; we believe it to be a powerful force which must be brought to bear upon our common problems and which can give vitality and effectiveness to the efforts we are making for their solution. The twenty-one American Republics have, by the...
21. lappuse - This accomplishment has only been partial, and it may well be but temporary. It would be a frightful commentary on the human race if, with the awful lesson of its disastrous experience, responsible and civilized governments should now fail. The nations of this continent should omit no word or act in their attempt to meet the dangerous conditions which endanger peace. Let our actions here at Buenos Aires constitute the most potent possible appeal to peacemakers and warmakers throughout the world....

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