The British Cyclopaedia of the Arts, Sciences, History, Geography, Literature, Natural History, and Biography ...

Pirmais vāks
Wm. S. Orr and Company, 1838

No grāmatas satura

Lietotāju komentāri - Rakstīt atsauksmi

Ierastajās vietās neesam atraduši nevienu atsauksmi.

Citi izdevumi - Skatīt visu

Bieži izmantoti vārdi un frāzes

Populāri fragmenti

46. lappuse - And it came to pass at noon, that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking, or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
136. lappuse - The gold and silver money which circulates in any country may very properly be compared to a highway, which, while it circulates and carries to market all the grass and corn of the country, produces itself not a single pile of either.
282. lappuse - For sublime objects are vast in their dimensions, beautiful ones comparatively small: beauty should be smooth and polished; the great, rugged and negligent: beauty should shun the right line, yet deviate from it insensibly; the great in many cases loves the right line; and when it deviates, it often makes a strong deviation: beauty should not be obscure; the great ought to be dark and gloomy: beauty should be light and delicate; and great ought to be solid, and even massive.
135. lappuse - The substitution of paper in the room of gold and silver money, replaces a very expensive instrument of commerce with one much less costly, and sometimes equally convenient. Circulation comes to be carried on by a new wheel, which it costs less both to erect and to maintain than the old one.
53. lappuse - Our language has received innumerable elegancies and improvements, from that infusion of Hebraisms, which are derived to it out of the poetical passages in, holy writ.
195. lappuse - ... is so essential to the subsistence of all human creatures, it is not probable that it could be trusted to the fallacious deductions of our reason, which is slow in its operations, appears not, in any degree, •during the first years of infancy, and, at best, is in every age and period of human life extremely liable to error and mistake.
195. lappuse - I shall add, for a further confirmation of the foregoing theory, that, as this operation of the mind, by which we infer like effects from like causes, and vice versa, is so essential to the subsistence of all human creatures, it is not probable that it could be trusted to the fallacious deductions of our reason, which is slow in its operations, appears not in any degree during the first years of infancy, and at best is, in every age and period of human life...
135. lappuse - ... purchase such goods as are likely to be consumed by idle people who produce nothing, such as foreign wines, foreign silks, &c. ; or, secondly, they may purchase an additional stock of materials, tools, and provisions, in order to maintain and employ an additional number of industrious people, who re-produce, with a profit, the value of their annual consumption.
215. lappuse - Lo, the poor Indian! whose untutored mind Sees God in clouds, or hears him in the wind; His soul, proud Science never taught to stray Far as the solar walk, or milky way; Yet simple Nature to his hope has...

Bibliogrāfiskā informācija