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SUBCOMMITTEE RECESS

Senator MATTINGLY. We will make the change. OK? Does anybody else have any other comments? It's great to have a good breath of fresh air going through here. We have had other people also to testify that have brought in some fresh air. I intend to help the rest of them along.

[Laughter.)
Senator MATTINGLY. Thank you very much.
Mr. SAWYER. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Senator MATTINGLY. The subcommittee will recess until 8 a.m., Friday, May 14.

(Whereupon, at 2:18 p.m. Monday, May 10, the subcommittee was recessed to reconvene at the call of the Chair.]

LEGISLATIVE BRANCH APPROPRIATIONS FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1983

FRIDAY, MAY 14, 1982

U.S. SENATE,
SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met, at 8:10 a.m., in room S-128, the Capitol, Hon. Mack Mattingly (chairman) presiding.

Present: Senator Mattingly.

LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

STATEMENTS OF:

HON. DANIEL J. BOORSTIN, LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS

GILBERT GUDE, DIRECTOR, CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE
ACCOMPANIED BY:

WILLIAM J. WELSH, DEPUTY LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS
DONALD C. CURRAN, ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS
JOHN O. HEMPERLEY, BUDGET OFFICER

BUDGET REQUEST

Senator MATTINGLY. The second day of hearings on the legislative branch appropriations will come to order.

Today it is my pleasure to hear from the Library of Congress. The Hon. Daniel J. Boorstin, Librarian of Congress will be the first witness. Welcome, Dr. Boorstin.

Dr. BOORSTIN. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

Senator MATTINGLY. We are glad to have you here on this Friday after a full night session in the U.S. Senate. I think I may be the only Senator living and breathing at this time of the morning.

With that, you may go ahead with your statement.

Dr. BOORSTIN. Thank you, Senator. I have a very brief statement I would like to read if I may.

Mr. Chairman, I especially appreciate the opportunity that you are giving us to present to you our 1983 budget for the Library of Congress. We are requesting a total of $223,760,000 for 1983.

Today, more than ever before, we need to draw on all the knowledge of the past and remain informed of the day-to-day progress in the present to enable us to make the most of all our resources. Knowledge is the catalyst and economizer of our economy.

IMPROVING SERVICES AND PRESERVING COLLECTIONS Our two emphases this year are: First, improving services to the increasing number and variety of our users; and second, improving urgent measures to preserve our deteriorating collections. Both are essentially measures of economy—the first to secure the maximum ividend and productivity of the knowledge resources accumulated over two centuries at such great expense; the second to insure that these resources will continue to be usable next year and the years after.

INCREASING USE OF LIBRARY OF CONGRESS

The Library of Congress is being heavily used 7 days a week. The increase in readership is dramatic. In fiscal 1979, we had a total of 863,000 readers and in fiscal 1981 this figure rose by 32 percent to 1,143,000. All the enlarging demands on the Congressional Research Service and other services are comparable. These users all have a right to expect the best reference assistance. In view of this increased workload, our requests are modest.

CONGRESSIONAL RESEARCH SERVICE

Of the total requested, $37,109,000 is for the Congressional Research Service which is appropiated under Title I of the Legislative Appropriation Bill. I would like to emphasize the importance of the Service and to say that if the Congressional Research Service is to continue to provide its vital research and reference support to the Congress, it will need to be adequately funded.

SERVICES TO OTHER LIBRARIES

The balance of the request, which is in title II of the bill, is for $186,651,000. This covers costs of running the Library service to other libraries and the world of learning, including administering the Nation's copyright program and providing national library service to the blind and physically handicapped throughout the Nation. Of the total increase of $21,791,000 over fiscal 1982, $11,500,000 is needed to comply with instructions by the House committee to substitute a direct appropriation in lieu of the Library using receipts from fees charged by the Copyright Office and from the sale of cards and technical publications by the cataloging distribution service.

INFLATIONARY COSTS

The second large category of increases in funding—$7,365,741-represents inflationary costs. This includes higher costs of materials for the Library's collections of supplies and equipment and of support services such as communications, postage, and repairs.

BOOKS FOR THE BLIND AND PHYSICALLY HANDICAPPED Under books for the blind and physically handicapped, we are prepared to offset our request for an increase of $2,094,000 with a reduction of the same amount in the account for replacement of talking book machines. As a result there would be no increase in funding in fiscal 1983 for this program.

WORKLOAD AND NEW PROGRAMS

Only $2,925,249 is requested for growing workload and for new programs, including funds for 60 new positions.

NEW FACILITY GENERATING GREATER USE

The Library of Congress by its unique services to the Congress, our Nation, and the world of learning, has earned and received the generous support of the Congress for nearly two centuries. The usefulness of our Library depends upon our continuing to acquire, catalog, and service our collections and keep them up to date. Many of you have seen the admirable new reading facilities in the Madison Building which opened last year for our Manuscript Division, our Geography and Map Division, the Law Library, and the Congressional Research Service. The increased use of these collections and services already shows the wisdom of the Congress in providing this great new Library building. With the return of the Geography and Map Division to Capitol Hill, the number of its readers has more than doubled. The Law Library since its move to the Madison Building has also nearly doubled readership. The serial and government publications reading room opened early this month. The prints and photographs and the performing arts reading rooms will open in the Madison Building during the next 12 months. We have every expectation that these enlarged and improved facilities will attract tens of thousands of new users.

IMPROVEMENT OF SERVICES TO PUBLIC

All these moves greatly enhance the Library by better service, by reducing congestion, and by improving opportunities and facilities for preservation. Our services will prove more economical and more attractive as we now locate our collections next to the special reading rooms devoted to their particular subjects. This would economize both the service to the readers and make an opportunity to draw together the various resources of the Library and dramatize them to the users. We are requesting eight positions for the new performing arts reading room which will serve readers using our unexcelled national collections of music, recorded sound, and motion pictures and keep our citizens alert to the greatness of our achievements in technology and the arts—and stir them to new efforts. This facility, which is unique in the world, Mr. Chairman, is one which we are very proud of and it is most important we give it full use. The 1,600,000-volume law collection, which now is housed for economy of space in the most up-to-date compact book shelving, requires four new positions.

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