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LEGISLATIVE BRANCH APPROPRIATIONS FOR

FISCAL YEAR 1983

MONDAY, MAY 10, 1982

U.S. SENATE,
SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON APPROPRIATIONS,

Washington, D.C. The subcommittee met at 7:55 a.m., in room S-128, the Capitol, Hon. Mack Mattingly (chairman) presiding.

Present: Senator Mattingly.

U.S. SENATE

SECRETARY OF THE SENATE

STATEMENT OF HON. WILLIAM F. HILDENBRAND

ACCOMPANIED BY:

MARILYN E. COURTOT, ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF THE SENATE
STUART F. BALDERSON, FINANCIAL CLERK

SUBCOMMITTEE PROCEDURE

Senator MATTINGLY. The meeting will come to order.

This morning the Subcommittee on the Legislative Branch opens 2 days of hearings on the fiscal year 1983 budget requests of the Congress and related agencies, as well as requests for fiscal year 1982 supplemental appropriations. This morning we will hear from Senate officers, the Architect of the Capitol, and the Director of the Congressional Budget Office. This afternoon the Comptroller General and Public Printer will testify. Our hearings will conclude on Friday morning with testimony from the Librarian of the Congress, the Director of the Congressional Research Service, the Office of Technology Assessment, and the Copyright Royalty Tribunal.

BUDGET REQUEST

The budget estimate for the Legislative Branch bill in 1983 totals $1.396 billion. Of this total, $236 million is for the Senate, $902 million is for all congressional operations, including the Senate, and $495 million for the other agencies funded in this bill. The subcommittee must also consider requests for $66 million in supplemental appropriations for fiscal year 1982, well over half of which is for increased pay costs.

(1)

CONGRESSIONAL SALARIES The 1983 figures do not represent the total costs of the legislative branch. Last year, a permanent appropriation was established for Senators' and Representatives' salaries. These salaries are no longer funded through an annual appropriation but are automatically paid from the Treasury without any further action by Congress. The bottom line, however, is the same: The U.S. Government will incur these expenses. Had these salary costs been included in their traditional manner, this bill would be over $6 million higher for the Senate and $29 million higher for the House, for a total in the legislative branch of $1,431,520,000.

REDUCING DEFICITS

Much remains to be completed on the overall fiscal plan for the coming year. Because of the extraordinary budgetary problems we face, Congress is at least a month behind in framing the outlines of the 1983 budget. But on one point there seems to be substantial agreement-discretionary nondefense domestic spending will be frozen at the fiscal year 1982 level. As much as many around here consider congressional programs as mandatory, they are in fact discretionary programs and should be subject to the same strict analysis and the same long, sharp knife as every other program is facing this year.

Many of my colleagues argue that the way to reduce the projected deficits is to raise taxes. Because of inflation, taxes in fact have risen dramatically over the years, and this has been a major factor in the weakness of our economy. President Reagan has taken Herculean steps to reverse this trend of rising taxes and last year won approval of one of the most important tax bills of this century. I am dedicated to the position that we must relieve the American taxpayer, especially the middle-income taxpayer, of oppressive tax burdens. I am equally committed to the notion that the way to reduce the projected Federal deficit is through holding the line on spending. That is the approach I will take with regard to legislative branch appropriations in 1983.

REDUCING SENATE EXPENDITURES

Last year, my first as chairman of this subcommittee, it was my objective to achieve a reduction in Senate expenditures and those of the other parts of the legislative branch. I am proud that Senate appropriations were 5 percent under those for the preceding year, an unprecedented reduction. It did not prove possible to reduce the entire bill under the 1981 level, but the overall bill was limited to barely a 3-percent increase, the smallest increase in years.

This year my objective will be to pass a bill which will appropriate a total of no more for fiscal year 1983 than will be available in 1982. I would like to put our witnesses on notice that officials requesting an increase in fiscal year 1983 will bear an extremely tough burden in establishing that the increase is justified.

Our first two witnesses are the Secretary of the Senate and the Senate Sergeant at Arms, two officials who were instrumental last year in enabling the Senate to make such a large cut through reductions in their own offices. I would like to publicly compliment them on this effort.

This morning we will first hear from the Hon. William F. Hildenbrand, Secretary of the Senate. You may condense your remarks or do whatever you would like with your message.

INTRODUCTION OF ASSOCIATES

Mr. HILDENBRAND. Thank you, Mr. Chairman.

I have with me this morning the Assistant Secretary of the Senate, Ms. Marilyn E. Courtot, and the Financial Clerk of the Senate, Stuart F. Balderson.

Mr. Chairman, I have previously submitted a full statement supporting my budget request for fiscal year 1983 and, at this time, I would like to highlight a few of the items in my statement.

PREPARED STATEMENT

Senator MATTINGLY. Your full statement will be inserted in the record at this point.

(The statement follows:]

STATEMENT OF WILLIAM F. HILDENBRAND

Mr. Chairman, I appreciate the opportunity of appearing today to submit

the fiscal year 1983 budget request for the Office of the Secretary. The total appropriation of $6,079,000 represents an increase of $132,550 over the budget request for the previous fiscal year. The major items reflected in

this increase are funding for the merit program, elimination of the pay cap,

on-line information services and enhancements to the computer system ia the

Stationery Room (see Figure 1).

Your Committee's approval last year to permit lump sum for the operation

of our office bas helped in many ways.

We are now able to set an allowance

for each department and, with the new financial reports, give our supervisors

an opportunity to monitor and control expenditures within the department. We

can now adjust salaries and create positions, as just cited, without the long

delay of waiting for the next budget cycle and thus be more responsive to new

demands placed upon our office. The proposed allocations for fiscal year 1983

by department are shown in Figure 2.

In March of last year, when I appeared before this Committee, I stated

that "an analysis of my current expenditures for both salaries and miscel

laneous items indicates a projected savings of 11.8 percent in salaries and

49.6 percent in niscellaneous items for fiscal year 1981." I am pleased to

report that the figures were actually 9.95 percent for salaries and 42 percent

for miscellaneous items.

Our office worked very hard to follow the mandate of

this Committee by leaving positions vacant as long as possible and keeping pay

raises to a minimum. The funds requested for fiscal year 1983 do not reflect

a significant increase, and I hope the Committee will recognize the necessity of having full funding if we are to maintain our level of service and keep

qualified personnel in our employment.

NEW PERSONNEL AND SERVICES

During the last fiscal year, we created a new department responsible for

interparliamentary services. This office will assist Members who are traveling

overseas on official business with the preparation of reports, visas, necessary

shots, and travel information.

The staff will primarily coordinate travel

related to the Canadian, NATO, Mexico, and IPU meetings.

In addition, we have added three individuals formerly on detail from the

Government Printing Office to our staff. Two of these individuals are book

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