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At a recent executive board meeting, the International Photographers
Guild, Local 659 of the 1.A.T.S.E., went on record as totally opposed
to the coloring of Black and White pictures. We feel that this ob-
scene proposal lacks justification on all levels of artistry and
creativity. It is a unilateral decision disregarding an important
period of the industry's history as well as the history of America.
Quite obviously, this decision is based solely on greed and no other
consideration.
As a Guild that represents the world's greatest cinematographers,
we share your many objections to this and any process that mutilates
the integrity of Black and White films.
Please let us know if we can be of any assistance concerning this
matter.

Best wishes.

Sincerely,

Geange Serie Dickie

. Spiris

George Spiro Dibie
President, Local 659
International Photographers Guild

Affiliated with

AFL-CIO
Colifornia State Federation of labor
California State Theatrical Federation
HOWO State AFL

CIO
Hollywood Film Council

Los Angeles County

Federation of labor Northwest Oregon Labor Council Socramento Central labor Council

son Francisco labor Council Sonia Clora Central lobor Council

Southern Nevodo
Central lobor Council

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In representing the Make-up Artists & Hairstylists of ir wonderful industries, I too would like to go on record 1.2 opposing the colorizing of the classic black and white films that have been made down through the years.

I also was there when we made many of these beautiful films and did participate in the early testing and designing of the proper colors that we used to make these classics.

In viewing the colorized black and white's I find that
the faces and hair of the actors and actresses are simply
atrocious. I can assure you that if any one of our Make-Up
Artists would have made a player look like they do after
being colorized we would have been fired on the spot.

In my humble opinion, I feel that the colorizing
(altering) the artistic endeavors of so many talented people,
would be like my trying to do a make-up on the "Mona Lisa".

I can further assure you that if Perc Westmore were alive
today he would have filed an immediate law suit after viewing
"The Maltese Falcon" and seeing how "Bogie" and Mary Astor
looked.

In short, this is a bastardization of the arts of our industry and although I realize that many many millions of dollars are about to be made on this project, I want to see it stopped for the 600 plus people that I represent.

Gil, anything that Local 706, the Make-Up Artists and Hairstylists can do to help in this effort, we stand ready, willing and able to do. I would like you to know that this expression has been approved by the Executive Board of this Local.

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SCREEN ACTORS GUILD

FOR RELEASE:
December 1, 1986

CONTACT: MARK LOCHER

(213) 856-6650

SAG NATIONAL BOARD OPPOSES 'COLORIZING' OF BLACK & WHITE FILMS

The Screen Actors Guild National Board of Directors has voted unanimously to oppose the "colorizing" of black-and-white films, and to cooperate with the Directors Guild of America and other industry organizations to discourage the practice.

By a vote of 65 to 0 (with four abstentions), Guild Board members expressed strong disapproval of "colorization," joining a growing number of industry artists and craftspeople who object to the computerized tinting of films for strictly commercial purposes. Board members acknowledged the financial incentives behind the practice, and opposed colorizing on artistic grounds.

In discussion prior to the vote, Guild officers expressed grave
concerns about the deleterious effect of colorizing and its
artificial and inaccurate rendering of actors' physical features
and characteristics. Many voiced a strong distaste for the
unrealistic pink and orange skin tones which obscure the
carefully photographed contours and nuances of actors' faces.
Several incidents of incorrect hair and eye color were noted,
as well as the color tint's inability to keep pace with actors'
movements and expressions.

Guild officials will meet with directors and other interested parties to explore methods of discouraging continued colorizing of black-and-white films.

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D BUILD LSA

DRAMA 64335SF
MR MICHAEL FRANKLIN

DEAR MICHAEL,
THE FRENCH MOVIE AUTHORS AND DIRECTORS FULLY SUPPORT THE FIGHT LED BY
THE DIRECTORS GUILD OF AMERICA AGAINST THE COLORIZATION OF THE BLACK
AND WHITE FILMS.
SACD HAS ASKED ALL THE PRESIDENTS OF THE TV CHANNELS TO TAKE
SOLEMALY THE ENGAGEMENT NEVER TO BUY THE RIGHTS OR BROADCAST A FILM
THAT WOULD HAVE BEEN SO COLORIZED.
FOR THE MOMENT WE RECEIVED SUCH ENGAGEMENT FROM TF1, CANAL PLUS,
LA CINQ, TVE. WE ARE WAITING FOR THE ANSWERS OF ANTÉNNE 2 AND FR3.
IT SEEMS FAIRLY POSSIBLE THAT WE RECEIVE A FULL AGREEMENT OF ALL
THE FRENCH TV CHANNELS.

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The Executive Board of the Costume Designers Guild protests your
planned coloring of black and white films from the 30's and 40's,
many of which are classics.
Costumes used in those films were designed specifically for the
black and white film genre. The materials, colors and styles of
the costumes were selected for lighting and mood and may not
translate at all well into color.

A Costume Designer's skills and experience, with respect to any picture, aid in the delineation of character, setting and period involved in the story being depicted. The costumes used in a film are often as important as the stage setting itself and are an integral part of the design and look of a film.

For someone to arbitrarily change the color and look of a designed costume is to substitute his or her judgement for that of the initial Costume Designer and Director. Some such changes are not harmful. In other instances, such changes will destroy everything the Costume Designer worked to achieve.

It is in these latter situations where harm is done, not only to
the film, but to the Costume Designer who is, by such changes, made
to look incompetent and insensitive. Needless to say, such an
imputation would be detrimental to the Costume Designer's reputation.
The colorization of "Yankee Doodle Dandy" may be used as an example
to illustrate our concerns. The dresses designed by Milo Anderson
in the scene at the railroad tracks were originally designed in
shades of gray. The "colors fit the scene and the mood of the story.

When the film was colored the dresses were redone in pastels and the mood of that scene changed completely. Numerous other examples can be cited but additional examples are unnecessary for the purpose of this letter.

Under the circumstances we urge that you not go forward with your planned colorization program.

Sincerely,

Carole Strasser

Carole Strasser
Executive Director

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