Railway Locomotives and Cars, 13. sējums

Pirmais vāks
Simmons-Boardman Publishing Corporation, 1841
 

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246. lappuse - As I had occasion to pass daily to and from the buildingyard, while my boat was in progress, I have often loitered unknown near the idle groups of strangers, gathering in little circles, and heard various inquiries as to the object of this new vehicle. The language was uniformly that of scorn, or sneer, or ridicule.
183. lappuse - Philadelphia was named as being nearer the centre of the Colonies, where the commissioners would be well and cheaply accommodated. The high roads, through the whole extent, are for the most part very good, in which forty or fifty miles a day may very well be, and frequently are, travelled. Great part of the way may likewise be gone by water. In summer time, the passages are frequently performed in a week from Charleston to Philadelphia and New York, and from Rhode Island to New York, through the...
246. lappuse - I elevated myself upon a platform and addressed the assembly. I stated that I knew not what was the matter, but if they would be quiet and indulge me for half an hour, I would either go on or abandon the voyage for that time.
130. lappuse - Sketch of the Geographical Rout of a Great Railway, by which it is proposed to connect the canals and navigable waters of New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Missouri, and the adjacent States and Territories opening thereby a free communication at all seasons of the year, between the Atlantic States and the Great Valley of the Mississippi. New York: G. & C. & H. Carvill, 1830.
246. lappuse - York, the project was viewed by the public either with indifference or with contempt, as a visionary scheme. My friends, indeed, were civil, but they were shy. They listened with patience to my explanations, but with a settled cast of incredulity on their countenances. I felt the full force of the lamentation of the poet, " Truths would you teach, to save a sinking land, All shun, none aid you, and few understand.
246. lappuse - They were silent, and sad, and weary. I read in their looks nothing but disaster, and almost repented of my efforts. The signal was given, and the boat moved on a short distance, ' and then stopped, and became immovable.
107. lappuse - Be it known that I, John Fitch, of Philadelphia, in the county of Philadelphia, the State of Pennsylvania, have invented a new and improved mode of preventing steam-boilers from bursting, and I do hereby declare that the following is a full and exact description thereof, reference being had to the accompanying drawings, and to the letters of reference marked thereon.
121. lappuse - ... men. The rest that had survived the ravages of war, famine, and pestilence, followed Xerxes on his route home. XERXES' BRIDGE. The famous bridge of Xerxes across the Hellespont, the strait which joins the Archipelago and the sea of Marmora.
246. lappuse - The loud laugh often rose at my expense ; the dry jest; the wise calculation of losses and expenditures; the dull but endless repetition of the Fulton Folly.
246. lappuse - Never did a single encouraging remark, a bright hope, or a warm wish, cross my path.

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