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ARTICLE IV

The present Convention shall be ratified as soon as possible, and shall come into force immediately after the exchange of ratifications. (31 Stat. 1878; Treaty Series, No. 314; Malloy, Treaties, II, 1595.)

(The Treaty between the United States and Germany restoring friendly relations signed at Berlin, August 25, 1921; ratification advised by the Senate, October 18, 1921 ; ratified by the President, October 21, 1921; ratified by Germany, November 2, 1921; ratifications exchanged at Berlin, November 11, 1921 ; and proclaimed, November 14, 1921; contains in Article 1 the fol. lowing provisions:]

ARTICLE I Germany undertakes to accord to the United States, and the United States shall have and enjoy, all the rights, privileges, indemnities, reparations or advantages specified in the aforesaid Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States of July 2, 1921, including all the rights and advantages stipulated for the benefit of the United States in the Treaty of Versailles which the United States shall fully enjoy notwithstanding the fact that such Treaty has not been ratified by the United States. (42 Stat. (pt. 2), 1939; Treaty Series, No. 658; Redmond, Treaties, III, 2596; 12 League of Nations Treaty Series, p. 192.)

[Article 278 of the Treaty of Versailles provides as follows:]

ARTICLE 278 Germany undertakes to recognise any new nationality which has been or may be acquired by her nationals under the laws of the Allied and Associated Powers and in accordance with the decisions of the competent authorities of these Powers pursuant to naturalisation laws or under treaty stipulations, and to regard such persons as having, in consequence of the acquisition of such new nationality, in all respects severed their allegiance to their country of origin. (Redmond, Treaties, III, 3329, 3449.)

GREAT BRITAIN [Naturalization convention signed at London, May 13, 1870; ratification advised by the Senate, July 8, 1870; ratified by the President, July 19, '1870; ratified by Great Britain, July 16, 1870; ratifications exchanged at London, August 10, 1870; proclaimed, September 16, 1870.]

ARTICLE I Citizens of the United States of America who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized according to law within the British dominions as British subjects, shall, subject to the provisions of Article II, be held by the United States to be in all respects and for all purposes British subjects, and shall be treated as such by the United States.

Reciprocally, British subjects who have become, or shall become, and are naturalized according to law within the United States of America as citizens thereof, shall, subject to the provisions of Article II, be held by Great Britain to be in all respects and for all purposes citizens of the United States, and shall be treated as such by Great Britain.

ARTICLE II

Such citizens of the United States as aforesaid who have become and are naturalized within the dominions of her Britannic Majesty as British subjects, shall be at liberty to renounce their naturalization and to resume their nationality as citizens of the United States, provided that such renunciation be publicly declared within two years after the exchange of the ratifications of the present convention.

Such British subjects as aforesaid who have become and are naturalized as citizens within the United States, shall be at liberty to renounce their naturalization and to resume their British nationality, provided that such renunciation be publicly declared within two years after the twelfth day of May, 1870.

The manner in which this renunciation may be made and publicly declared shall be agreed upon by the Governments of the respective countries.

ARTICLE III If any such citizen of the United States as aforesaid, naturalized within the dominions of her Britannic Majesty, should renew his residence in the United States, the United States Government may, on his own application and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, re-admit him to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States, and Great Britain shall not, in that case, claim him as a British subject on account of his former naturalization.

In the same manner, if any such British subject as aforesaid naturalized in the United States should renew his residence within the dominions of her Britannic Majesty, her Majesty's government may, on his own application and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, re-admit him to the character and privileges of a British subject, and the United States shall not, in that case, claim him as a citizen of the United States on account of his former naturalization. (16 Stat. 775; Treaty Series, No. 130; Malloy, Treaties, I, 691.)

(See also Treaty under "Germany.")

GUAM

(See Treaty under "Spain.")

GUATEMALA
[See Multipartite Treaties at page 631.)

HAITI [Naturalization treaty signed at Washington, March 22, 1902; ratification advised by the Senate, February 1, 1904; ratified by the President, March 17, 1904; ratified by Haiti, April 24, 1903; ratifications exchanged at Washington, March 19, 1904; proclaimed, March 24, 1904.)

ARTICLE I Citizens of the United States of America who shall have been duly naturalized as citizens of Haiti, and who shall have resided uninterruptedly in Haiti during a period of five years, shall be recognized by the United States as citizens of Haiti.

Reciprocally, citizens of Haiti who shall have been duly naturalized as citizens of the United States of America, and who shall have resided uninterruptedly in the United States during a period of five years, shall be recognized by Haiti as citizens of the United States.

This article shall apply as well to those already naturalized in either country as those hereafter naturalized.

ARTICLE II The person who, after having become a naturalized citizen of one of the contracting States, shall return to live in the country of his origin, without intention to return to the country where he has been naturalized, shall be considered as having renounced the nationality obtained through naturalization.

ARTICLE III The intent not to return may be held to exist when the person naturalized in the one country resides more than two years in the other country.

ARTICLE IV The naturalized citizens of either State who return to their country of origin, will be there liable to prosecution and punishment in conformity to the laws for the crimes or misdemeanors committed before their emigration and that are not covered by the statute of limitations.

ARTICLE V

The declaration of intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturalization. (33 Stat. (pt. 2), 2101; Treaty Series, No. 432; Malloy, Treaties, I, 939.)

[See also Multipartite Treaties at page 631.)

HONDURAS [Naturalization convention signed at Tegucigalpa, June 23, 1908; ratification advised by the Senate, December 10, 1908; ratified by the President, December 26, 1908; ratified by Honduras, April 7, 1909; ratifications exchanged at Tegucigalpa, April 16, 1909; proclaimed, June 8, 1909.)

ARTICLE I Citizens of the United States who may or shall have been naturalized in Honduras, upon their own application or by their own consent, will be considered by the United States as citizens of the Republic of Honduras. Reciprocally, Honduraneans who may or shall have been naturalized in the United States upon their own application or with their own consent, will be considered by the Republic of Honduras as citizens of the United States.

ARTICLE II

If a Honduranean, naturalized in the United States of America, renews his residence in Honduras, without intent to return to the United States, he may be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States. Reciprocally, if a citizen of the United States, naturalized in Honduras, renews his residence in the United States, without intent to return to Honduras, he may be presumed to have renounced his naturalization in Honduras.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when the person naturalized in the one country, resides more than two years in the other country, but this presumption may be destroyed by evidence to the contrary.

ARTICLE III

It is mutually agreed that the definition of the word "citizen," as used in this Convention, shall be held to mean a person to whom the nationality of the United States or of Honduras attaches.

ARTICLE IV A recognized citizen of the one party, returning to the territory of the other, remains liable to trial and legal punishment for an action punishable by the laws of his original country and committed before his emigration, but not for the emigration itself, saving always the limitation established by the laws of his original country, and any other remission of liability to punishment.

ARTICLE V The declaration of intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturalization. (36 Stat. (pt. 2), 2160; Treaty Series, No. 525; Malloy, Treaties, I, 958.)

[See also Multipartite Treaties at page 631.]

HUNGARY [The Treaty between the United States and Hungary establishing friendly relations signed at Budapest, August 29, 1921; ratification advised by the Senate, October 18, 1921 ; ratified by the President, October 21, 1921; ratified by Hungary, December 12, 1921; ratifications exchanged at Budapest, December 17, 1921; and proclaimed, December 20, 1921, contains the following provision:]

ARTICLE I Hungary undertakes to accord to the United States, and the United States shall have and enjoy, all the rights, privileges, indemnities, reparations or advantages specified in the aforesaid Joint Resolution of the Congress of the United States of July 2, 1921, including all the rights and advantages stipulated for the benefit of the United States in the Treaty of Trianon which the United States shall fully enjoy notwithstanding the fact that such Treaty has not been ratified by the United States. The United States, in availing itself of the rights and advantages stipulated in the provisions of that Treaty, will do so in a manner consistent with the rights accorded to Hungary under such provisions. _(42 Stat. (pt. 2), 1951; Treaty Series, No. 660; Redmond, Treaties, III, 2693; 48 League of Nations Treaty series, p. 191.)

[Article 213 of the Treaty of Trianon provides as follows :)

ARTICLE 213 Hungary undertakes to recognize any new nationality which has been or may be acquired by her nationals under the laws of the Allied and Associated Powers, and in accordance with the decisions of the competent authorities of these Powers pursuant to naturalization laws or under treaty stipulations, and to regard such persons as having, in consequence of the acquisition of such new nationality, in all respects severed their allegiance to their country of origin. (Redmond, Treaties, III, 3541, 3624.)

LITHUANIA [Signed at Kaunas, October 18, 1937; ratification advised by the Senate of the United States, June 13, 1938; ratified by the President of the United States, July 5, 1938; ratified by Lithuania, December 30, 1937; ratifications exchanged at Washington, July 20, 1938; proclaimed by the President of the United States, August 15, 1938.]

ARTICLE I

Nationals of either country, who have been or shall become naturalized in the territory of the other country shall not, upon returning to the country of former nationality for a temporary stay, be required to perform military service or any other act of allegiance, or punished for the original act of emigration, or for failure to respond to a call for military service, liability for which did not accrue until after bona fide residence was acquired in the territory of the country whose nationality was obtained by naturalization.

Provided, that, if a national of either country who comes within the purview of this article shall renew his residence in his country of origin without the intent to return to the country in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when a person naturalized in one country shall have resided more than two years in the other country; but this presumption may be overcome by evidence to the contrary.

ARTICLE II

A person born in the territory of one country of parents who are nationals of the other country, and having the nationality of

568700—44-28

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