Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub

United States, he may be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States. Reciprocally, if a citizen of the United States, naturalized in Costa Rica, renews his residence in the United States, without intent to return to Costa Rica, he may be presumed to have renounced his naturalization in Costa Rica.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when the person naturalized in the one country, resides more than two years in the other country, but this presumption may be destroyed by evidence to the contrary.

ARTICLE III It is mutually agreed that the definition of the word "citizen" as used in this convention, shall be held to mean a person to whom nationality of the United States or Costa Rica attaches.

ARTICLE IV

A recognized citizen of the one party, returning to the territory of the other, remains liable to trial and legal punishment for an action punishable by the laws of his original country and committed before his emigration; but not for the emigration itself, saving always the limitation established by the laws of his original country, and any other remission of liability to punishment,

ARTICLE V The declaration of intention to become a citizen of the one or the other country has not for either party the effect of naturalization. (37 Stat. (pt. 2), 1603; Treaty Series, No. 570; Redmond, Treaties, III, 2544; Charles, Treaties, III, 23.)

(See also Multipartite Treaties at page 631.)

CUBA
[See Multipartite Treaties at page 631.)

CZECHOSLOVAKIA (Naturalization treaty signed at Prague, July 16, 1928; ratification advised by the Senate, January 26, 1929; ratified by the President, February 14, 1929; ratified by Czechosolvakia, September 14, 1929; ratifications exchanged at Washington, September 14, 1929; proclaimed, November 14, 1929.]

ARTICLE I

Nationals of the United States who have been or shall be naturalized in Czechoslovak territories shall be held by the United States to have lost their former nationality and to be nationals of Czechoslovakia.

Reciprocally, nationals of Czechoslovakia who have been or shall be naturalized in the territories of the United States shall be held by Czechoslovakia to have lost their former nationality and to be nationals of the United States.

The foregoing provisions of this Article shall not be applicable to a national of either country who obtains naturalization in the other while his country is at war.

The word "national", as used in this convention, means a person having the nationality of the United States or Czechoslovakia, respectively, under the laws thereof.

The word “naturalized” refers to the naturalization of a person over twenty-one years of age, granted upon his own application, while he is permanently residing within the country of naturalization, and to the naturalization of a person under twenty-one years of age through the naturalization of a parent, provided such person has acquired a permanent residence within the country of naturalization.

ARTICLE II Nationals of either of the Contracting States naturalized as provided in Article I, shall not, upon their return to the territory of the country of which they were formerly nationals, be prosecuted or punished for expatriation or for having failed, prior to their naturalization, to answer summonses to military service which had been served upon them within a period of five years preceding their naturalization.

ARTICLE III If a national of either country, who comes within the purview of Article I, shall renew his residence in his original country without the intent to return to that in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have lost the nationality acquired by naturalization.

The intent not to return may be held to exist when a person naturalized in the one country shall have resided more than two years in the other. (46 Stat. (pt. 2), 2424; Treaty Series, No. 804; Trenwith, Trorties, IV, 4063; 96 League of Nations Treaty Series, p. 301.)

DENMARK

[Naturalization convention signed at Copenhagen, July 20, 1872; ratification advised by the Senate, January 13, 1873; atified by the President, January 22, 1873; ratified by Denmark, November 13, 1872; ratifications exchanged at Copenhagen, March 14, 1873; proclaimed April 15, 1873.]

ARTICLE I Citizens of the United States of America who have become, or shall become, and are, naturalized, according to law, within the Kingdom of Denmark as Danish subjects, shall be held by the United States of America to be in all respects and for all purposes Danish subjects, and shall be treated as such by the United States of America.

In like manner, Danish subjects who have become, or shall become, and are, naturalized, according to law, within the United States of America as citizens thereof, shall be held by the Kingdom of Denmark to be in all respects and for all purposes as citizens of the United States of America, and shall be treated as such by the Kingdom of Denmark.

ARTICLE II If any such citizen of the United States, as aforesaid, naturalized within the Kingdom of Denmark as a Danish subject, should renew his residence in the United States, the United States Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may see fit to impose, re-admit him to the character and privileges of a citizen of the United States, and the Danish Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a Danish subject on account of his former naturalization.

In like manner, if any such Danish subject, as aforesaid, naturalized within the United States as a citizen thereof, should renew his residence within the Kingdom of Denmark, His Majesty's Government may, on his application, and on such conditions as that Government may think fit to impose, re-admit him to the character and privileges of a Danish subject, and the United States Government shall not, in that case, claim him as a citizen of the United States on account of his former naturalization.

ARTICLE III If, however, a citizen of the United States, naturalized in Denmark, shall renew his residence in the former country without the intent to return to that in which he was naturalized, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization.

In like manner, if a Dane, naturalized in the United States, shall renew his residence in Denmark without the intent to return to the former country, he shall be held to have renounced his naturalization in the United States.

The intent not to return may be held to exist, when a person naturalized in the one country shall reside more than two years in the other country. (17 Stat. 941; Treaty Series, No. 69; Malloy, Treaties, I, 384.)

(Convention for the cession of the Danish West Indies to the United States by Denmark signed at New York, August 4, 1916; ratification advised by the Senate, September 7, 1916; ratified by the President, January 16, 1917; ratified by Denmark, December 22, 1916; ratifications exchanged at Washington, January 17, 1917; proclaimed, January 25, 1917.]

ARTICLE VI Danish citizens residing in said Islands may remain therein or may remove therefrom at will, retaining in either event all their rights of property, including the right to sell or dispose of such property or its proceeds; in case they remain in the Islands, they shall continue until otherwise provided, to enjoy all the private, municipal and religious rights and liberties secured to them by the laws now in force. If the present laws are altered, the said inhabitants shall not thereby be placed in a less favorable position in respect to the above mentioned rights and liberties than they now enjoy. Those who remain in the Islands may preserve their citizenship in Denmark by making before a court of record, within one year from the date of the exchange of ratifications of this convention, a declaration of their decision to preserve such citizenship; in

а

default of which declaration they shall be held to have renounced it, and to have accepted citizenship in the United States; for children under eighteen years the said declaration may be made by their parents or guardians. Such election of Danish citizenship shall however not, after the lapse of the said term of one year, be a bar to their renunciation of their preserved Danish citizenship and their election of citizenship in the United States and admission to the nationality thereof on the same terms as may be provided according to the laws of the United States, for other inhabitants of the Islands.

The civil rights and the political status of the inhabitants of the islands shall be determined by the Congress, subject to the stipulations contained in the present convention. (39 Stat. (pt. 2), 1706; Treaty Series No. 629; Treaties, etc., III, 2558.)

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
[See Multipartite Treaties at page 631.)

ECUADOR
[See Multipartite Treatles at page 631. )

EL SALVADOR
[See Multipartite Treaties at page 831.)

FINLAND [Bigned at Helsinki, January 27, 1939; ratification advised by the Senate of the United States, August 1, 1939; ratified by the President of the United States, August 14, 1939; ratified by Finland, September 29, 1939; ratifications exchanged at Helsinki, October 3, 1939; proclaimed by the President of the United States, October 7, 1939.]

ARTICLE I A person possessing the nationality of both the High Contracting Parties who habitually resides in the territory of one of them and who is in fact most closely connected with that Party shall be exempt from all military obligations in the territory of the other Party.

ARTICLE II The present convention shall be ratified and the ratifications thereof shall be exchanged at Helsinki. It shall take effect in all its provisions on the day of the exchange of ratifications and shall continue in force for the term of ten years from that day.

If within six months before the expiration of ten years from the day on which the present convention shall come into force, neither High Contracting Party notifies the other of an intention of terminating the convention upon the expiration of the aforesaid period of ten years, the convention shall remain in full force and effect after the aforesaid period and until six months from such a time as either of the High Contracting Parties shall have notified to the other an intention of terminating the convention.

In witness whereof, the respective Plenipotentiaries have signed the present convention and have affixed their seals thereto.

Done in duplicate, in the English and Finnish languages, both authentic, at Helsinki, this twenty-seventh day of January, nineteen hundred and thirty-nine.

FRANCE

(Signed at Paris, April 30, 1803; ratification advised by the Senate, October 20, 1803; ratified by the President, October 21, 1803; ratifications exchanged October 21, 1803; proclaimed October 21, 1803.)

ARTICLE III The inhabitants of the ceded territory shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States and admitted as soon as possible according to the principles of the Federal Constitution to the enjoyment of all the rights, advantages and immunities of citizens of the United States; and in the mean time they shall be maintained and protected in the free enjoyment of their liberty, property and the Religion which they profess. (8 Stat. 200; Treaty Series, No. 86; Malloy, Treaties, 1, 508.)

GERMANY

(Signed at Washington, December 2, 1899; ratification advised by the Senate, January 16, 1900; ratified by the President, February 13, 1900; ratifications exchanged February 16, 1900; proclaimed February 16, 1900. ]

ARTICLE I The General Act concluded and signed by the aforesaid Powers at Berlin on the 14th day of June, A. D. 1889, and all previous treaties, conventions and agreements relating to Samoa, are annulled.

ARTICLE II Germany renounces in favor of the United States of America all her rights and claims over and in respect to the Island of Tutuila and all other islands of the Samoan group east of Longitude 171° west of Greenwich.

Great Britain in like manner renounces in favor of the United States of America all her rights and claims over and in respect to the Island of Tutuila and all other islands of the Samoan group east of Longitude 171° west of Greenwich.

Reciprocally, the United States of America renounce in favor of Germany all their rights and claims over and in respect to the Islands of Upolu and Savaii and all other Islands of the Samoan group west of Longitude 171° west of Greenwich.

ARTICLE III It is understood and agreed that each of the three signatory Powers shall continue to enjoy, in respect to their commerce and commercial vessels, in all the islands of the Samoan group privi. leges and conditions equal to those enjoyed by the sovereign Power, in all ports which may be open to the commerce of either of them.

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »