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deposited in the Treasury in the same manner as other naturalization fees. (48 Stat. 597; 8 U.S. C. 380a.)

Sec. 6.50 (a) The third paragraph of the second subdivision of section 4 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, is amended to read as follows:

“As to each period of residence at any place in the county where the petitioner resides at the time of filing his petition, there shall be included in the petition the affidavits of at least two credible witnesses, citizens of the United States, stating that each has personally known the petitioner to have been a resident at such place for such period, and that the petitioner is and during all such period has been a person of good moral character." 50 (45 Stat. 1513; 8 U. S. C. 379.)

(b) The fourth subdivision of section 4 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, is amended to read as follows:

“Fourth. No alien shall be admitted to citizenship unless (1) immediately preceding the date of his petition the alien has resided continuously within the United States for at least five years and within the county where the petitioner resided at the time of filing his petition for at least six months, (2) he has resided continuously within the United States from the date of his petition up to the time of his admission to citizenship, and (3) during all the periods referred to in this subdivision he has behaved as a person of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well disposed to the good order and happiness of the United States. At the hearing of the petition, residence in the county where the petitioner resides at the time of filing his petition, and the other qualifications required by this subdivision during such residence, shall be proved by the oral testimony of at least two credible witnesses, citizens of the United States, in addition to the affidavits required by this Act to be included in the petition. If the petitioner has resided in two or more places in such county and for this reason two witnesses can not be procured to testify as to all such residence, it may be proved by the oral testimony of two such witnesses for each such place of residence, in addition to the affidavits required by this Act to be included in the petition. At the hearing, residence within the United States, but outside the county, and the other qualifications required by this subdivision during such residence shall be proved either by depositions made before a naturalization examiner or by the oral testimony of at least two such witnesses for each place of residence. (45 Stat. 1513-1514; 8 U. S. C. 382.)

For footpote 48 see p. 532.

to Prior to March 2, 1929. the third paragraph of the second subdivision of sec. 4, Act of June 29, 1906 (34 Stat. 597), as amended, read as follows: "The petition shall also be verified by the affidavits of at least two credible witnesses, wbo are citizens of the United States, and wbo shall state in their affidavits that they have personally known the applicant to be a resident of the United States for a period of at least five years continuously, and of the State. Territory, or the District of Columbia. In which the application is made for a period of at Jeast one year immediately preceding the date of the aling of his petition, and that they each bave personal knowledge that the petitioner is a person of good moral character, and that he is in every way qualified, in their opinion, to be admitted as a citizen of the United States." Repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1172; 8 U. S. C. 904), effective January 13, 1941. See sec. 309 (a) of that Act, p. 363, for similar provisions.

67 The fourth subdivision of sec. 4. Act of June 29, 1906 (34 Stat. 598), originally read as follows in that Act : "It shall be made to appear to the satisfaction of the court admitting any allen to citizenship that immediately preceding the date of his application he has resided continuously within the United States ive years at least, and within the State or Territory, where such court is at the time held one year at least and that during that time be bas behaved as a man of good moral character, attached to the principles of the Constitution of the United States, and well dig. posed to the good order and happiness of the same. In addition to the oath of the applicant, the testimony of at least two witnesses, citizens of the United States, as to the facts of residence, moral character, and attachment to the principles of the Constitution shall be reqnired, and the name, place of residence and orcupation of each witness shall be set forth in the record." Repealed by sec. 604, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1172; 8 U. S. C. 904), effective January 13, 1941. See sec. 309 (b) and (c) for similar provisions, pp. 363-304.

"Absence from the United States for a continuous period of more than six months and less than one year during the period for which continuous residence is required for admission to citizenship, immediately preceding the date of filing the petition for naturalization, or during the period between the date of filing the petition, and the date of final hearing, shall be presumed to break the continuity of such residence, but such presumption may be overcome by the presentation to the naturalization court of satisfactory evidence that such individual had a reasonable cause for not returning to the United States during such absence. Absence from the United States for a continuous period of one year or more during the period for which continuous residence is required for admission to citizenship immediately preceding the date of filing the petition for naturalization or during the period between the date of filing the petition and the date of final hearing, shall break the continuity of such residence, except, that in the case of an alien

“(a) who has been lawfully admitted into the United States for permanent residence,

“(b) who has resided in the United States for at least one year thereafter, and

"(c) who has made a declaration of intention to become a citizen of the United States, who shall be deemed an eligible alien for the purposes of this paragraph and who thereafter has been sent abroad as an employee of or under contract with the Government of the United States, or who thereafter proceeded abroad as an employee or representative of, or under contract with an American institution of research recognized as such by the Attorney General, or as an employee of a firm or corporation engaged in the development of foreign trade and commerce of the United States, or a subsidiary thereof, or any such eligible alien as above defined who has proceeded abroad temporarily and has within a period of one year of his departure from the United States become an employee or representative of, or who is under contract with such an American institution of research, or has become an employee of such an American firm or corporation, no such absence shall break the continuity of residence in the United States if

“(1) Prior to the beginning of such absence, or prior to the beginning of such employment, contract, or representation on behalf of an American institution of research or an American firm or corporation as aforesaid, such alien has established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General 52 that his absence for such period is to be on behalf of such government or for the purpose of carrying on scientific research on behalf of such institution, or to be engaged solely or principally in the development of such foreign

See footnote 53, D. 470.

trade and commerce, or whose residence abroad is necessary to the protection of the property rights abroad of such firm or corporation; and

“(2) Such alien proves to the satisfaction of the court that his absence from the United States for such period has been for such purpose.

“An alien who has been lawfully admitted into the United States for permanent residence, and who is the wife or husband of a citizen of the United States so engaged abroad within one of the abovementioned categories, shall be considered as residing in the United States for the purpose of naturalization notwithstanding any absence from the United States.

“This amendment shall not affect cases of aliens who prior to the date of its enactment have established to the satisfaction of the Attorney General,62 pursuant to an Act entitled 'An Act to amend the naturalization laws in respect of residence requirements, and for other purposes,' approved June 25, 1936, that absence from the United States was to be or had been for the purpose of carrying on activities described therein.” (52 Stat. 1247-1248; 8 U. Š. C. 382.) 53

For footnote 52 see p. 534,

* Joint Resolution of June 29, 1938, repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1173; 8 U. S. C. 904), etfective January 13, 1941. As originally added to sec. 4, Act of June 29, 1906, by sec. 6 (a) Act of March 2, 1929 (45 Stat. 1513-1514) the sec ond paragraph of the fourth subdivision thereof read as follows: "If an individual returns to the country of his allegiance and remains therein for a continuous period of more than six months and less than one year during the period immediately preceding the date of Aling the petition for citizenship for which continuous residence is required as a condition precedent to admission to citizenship, the continuity of such residence shall be presumed to be broken, but such presumption may be overcome by the presentation of satisfactory evidence that such individual had a reasonable cause for not returning to the United States prior to the expiration of such six months. Absence from the United States for a continuous period of one year or more during the period immediately preceding the date of filing the petition for citizenship for, which continuous residence is required as a condition precedent to admission to citizenship shall break the continuity of such residence."

The second paragraph of subdivision 4, sec. 4, Act of June 29, 1906, was subsequently amended by sec. 1, Act of June 25, 1936 (49 Stat. 1925), and between June 25, 1936, and June 29, 1938, read as follows:

"If an individual returns to the country of his allegiance and remains therein for a continuous period of more than six months and less than one year during the period immediately preceding the date of filing the petition for citizenship for which continuous residence is required as a condition precedent to admission to citizenship, the continuity of such residence shall be presumed to be broken, but such presumption may be overcome by the presentation of satisfactory evidence that such individual had a reasonable cause for not returning to the United States prior to the expiration of such six months. Absence from the United States for a continuous period of one year or more during the period immediately preceding the date of filing the petition for citizenship for which continuous residence is required as a condition precedent to admission to citizenship shall break the continuity of such residence, except that in the case of an alien declarant for citizenship employed by or under contract with the Government of the United States or an American institution of research recognized as such by the Secretary of Labor, or employed by an American firm or corporation engaged in whole or in part in the development of foreign-trade and commerce of the United States or a subsidiary thereof, no period of residence outside the United States shall break the continuity of residence if (1) prior to the beginning of such period (whether such period begins before or after his departure from the United States) the alien has established to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Labor that bis absence from the United States for such period is to be on behalf of such Government, or for the purpose of carrying on scientific research on behalf of such institution, or to be engaged in the development of such foreign trade and commerce or whose residence abroad is necessary to the protection of the property rights in such countries of such firm or corporation and (2) such alien proves to the satisfaction of the court that his absence from the United States for such period has been for such purpose.”

Sec. 2. Act of June 25, 1936, also provided as follows:

“No period of residence outside the United States during the five years immediately preceding the enactment of this Act (June 25, 1936) shall be held to have broken the continuity of residence required by the naturalization laws if the alien proves to the satisfaction of the Secretary of Labor and the court that during all such

period of absence he has been under employment by, or contract with, the United States, or such American Institution of research, or American Arm or corporation, described in section 1 hereof, and has been carrying on the activities described in this Act in their beball."

(c) 54 So much of the seventh subdivision of section 4 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, as reads "or for three years on board of merchant or fishing vessels of the United States of more than twenty tons burden" is amended to read as follows: "or for three years on board vessels of more than twenty tons burden, whether or not documented under the laws of the United States, and whether public or private, which are not foreign vessels." 56 (45 Stat. 1514; 8 U. S. C. 388.)

(d) So much of such subdivision as reads "without proof of the required five years' residence within the United States if upon examination by the representative of the Immigration and Naturalization Service 58 in accordance with the requirements of this subdivision it is shown that such residence can not be established" is amended to read as follows:“and may be naturalized without complying with the requirements of residence within the United States and within the county.” 56 (45 Stat. 1514; 8 U. S. C. 388.)

(e) Section 10 of such Act of June 29, 1906, see p. 483, as amended, and section 2170 of the Revised Statutes, are repealed. See p. 457. (45 Stat. 1514; 8 U. S. C. 383.)

Sec. 7. (a) The second and third paragraphs of section 13 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, are amended to read as follows:

“(1) For receiving and filing a declaration of intention and the issuing of a duplicate thereof, $2.50; 57

“(2) For making, filing, and docketing a petition for citizenship, and issuing a certificate of citizenship if the issuance of such certificate is authorized by the court, and for the final hearing on the petition, $5.58 (48 Stat. 597; 8 U. S. C. 402.).

(6) Notwithstanding the provisions of section 9 of the Act entitled “An Act to fix the salaries of the clerks of the United States district courts and to provide for their office expenses, and for other purposes," approved February 26, 1919, as amended, all fees received by the clerks of courts to which such section applies for services rendered in naturalization proceedings shall be paid over to the Immigration and Naturalization Service 59 within thirty days from the close of each quarter in each fiscal year and the moneys so received shall be disposed of in the same manner as provided in section 13 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended.co (45 Stat. 1515; 8 U.S. C. 402a.)

* Repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat 1172; 8 0. S. C. 904), effective Japuary 13, 1941. See sec. 325 thereof, p. 373, for provisions on this subject.

56 For text of Årst paragraph of subdivision 7, sec. 4, Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, containing the words quoted, see p. 470.

56 See footnote 61, p. 474.

87 The fee for receiving and filing a declaration of intention and the issuance of a duplicate thereof was originally $1. It was increased to $5 by sec. 7 (a), Act of Marcb 2, 1929 (45 Stat. 1514–1515; 8 U.S. C. 402) effective July 1, 1929. but was subsequently reduced to $2.50 by sec. 1, Act of April 19, 1931 (48 Stat. 597 : 8 U. S. C. 402). Sec. 342 (a) (1), p. 391, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1161: 8 U. S. C. 742 (a)). effective January 13, 1941, made no change in fee.

18 This paragraph originally read as follows in the act of June 29, 1906 (34 Stat. 600): "For making, bling and docketing the petition of an alien for admission as a citizen of the United States and for the final hearing thereon, two dollars; and for entering the final order and the issuance of the certificate of citizenship thereunder, ir granted, two dollars." This paragraph was subsequently amended by sec. 7 (a), Act of March 2, 1929 (45 Stat. 1514-1515; 8 U. S. C. 402), effective July 1, 1929. to read as follows: "(2) For making filing, and docketing a petition for citizenship. and issuing a certificate of citizenship if the issuance of such certificate is authorized by the court, and for the final hearing on the petition, $10." The fee for making. fling and docketing a petition for naturalization, and issuing a certificate of naturalization was subsequently reduced to $5 by sec. 1. Act of April 19, 1934 (48 Stat. 597; 8 U. S. C. 402), repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1173; 8 U.'s. c. 904). effective January 13. 1941. Sec. 342 (a) (2), p. 391, of said Nationality Act of 1940 made no change in fee.

se See footnote 61, p. 474.

SEC. 8. The first sentence of section 28 of such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, is amended 61 to read as follows:

“The Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization,62 with the approval of the Attorney General,6shall make such rules and regulations and such changes in the forms prescribed by section 27 of this Act as may be necessary to carry into effect the provisions of the naturalization laws.” (45 Stat. 1515; 8 U. S. C. 356.)

Seo. 9. Such Act of June 29, 1906, as amended, is amended by adding at the end thereof the following:

“Sec. 32. (a) If any certificate of citizenship issued to any citizen, or any declaration of intention furnished to any declarant, under the naturalization laws, is lost, multilated, or destroyed, the citizen or declarant may, upon the payment to the Commissioner of a fee of $1, make application (accompanied by two photographs of the applicant) to the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization 62 for a new certificate or declaration. If the Commissioner finds that the certification or declaration is lost, multilated, or destroyed, he shall issue to the applicant a new certificate or declaration with one of such photographs of the applicant affixed thereto. Provided, That an alien veteran as defined in section 1 of the Act of May 26, 1926 (44 Stat. 654; (U. S. C., Supp. VII, title 8, sec. 241 (a)), shall not be required to pay the fee required by this subdivision. (48 Stat. 597, amending 45 Stat. 1515; 8 U. S. C.

(a).) 64 “(b) Upon payment to the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization 62 of a fee of $5,65 the Commissioner shall issue, for any naturalized citizen, a special certificate of citizenship, with a photograph (furnished by such citizen) affixed thereto, for use by such citizen only for the purpose of obtaining recognition as a citizen of the United States by the country of former allegiance of such citizen. Such certificate, when issued, shall be furnished to the Secretary of State for transmission by him to the proper authority in such country of former allegiance. (45 Stat. 1515; 8 U.S. C. 399b (b).)

* For provisions of sec. 9, Act of February 28, 1919, as amended, see p. 521. Repealed by sec. 504 Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1173; 8 U. S. C. 904), erective January 13, 1941. See sec. 342 (e), p. 392, of that Act for similar provisions.

a Prior to March 2, 1929, the first sentence of sec. 28, Act of June 29, 1906, read as follows: "That the Secretary of Labor shall bave power to make such rules and regulations as may be necessary for properly carrying into execution the various provisions of this Act." Repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1172 ; 8 U. S. C. 904), effective January 13, 1941. See sec. 327 (b), p. 375, of that Act for similar provisions.

See footnote 69, p. 476. * See footnote 53, p. 470.

Sec. 4, Act of April 19, 1934, repealed effective January 13, 1941, by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1173 ; 8 U. S. C. 904), amending subdivision (a), sec. 32 Act of June 29. 1906. as added thereto by sec. 9. Act of March 2, 1929. Prior to April 19. 1934, subdivision (a), sec. 32, Act of June 29, 1906, read as follows: "(a) If any certificate of citizenship issued to any citizen, or any declaration of Intention furnished to any declarant, under the naturalization laws, is lost, mutilated, or destroyed, the citizen or declarant may, upon the payment to the Commissioner of a fee of $10, make application raccompanied by two photographs of the applicant) to the Commissioner of Immigration and Naturalization for a new certificate or declaration. If the Commissioner finds that the certificate or declaration is lost, mutilated, or destroyed, he shall issue to the applicant a new certificate or declaration with one of such photo graphs of the applicant affixed thereto." (45 Stat. 1515.)

The fee for a special certificate of citizenship was originally $10. Sec. 2, Act of April 19. 1934 (48 Stat. 597 ; 8 U.S. C. 3996 (b)), repealed by sec. 504, Nationality Act of 1940 (54 Stat. 1173; 8 U. S. C. 904), etfective January 13,1941,' reduced the fee

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