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ders and for the erection of such fences in the immediate vicinity of such highways and roads as may be necessary to prevent unlawful entry or smuggling. 48 (46 Stat. 817; 54 Stat. 1091; 19 U. S. C. 68.)

CITIZENSHIP AND NATURALIZATION OF MARRIED WOMEN

Act approved July 3, 1930 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Act entitled “An Act relative to the naturalization and citizenship of married women," approved September 22, 1922, is amended by adding the following at the end thereof:

"SEC. 8. That any woman eligible by race to citizenship who has married a citizen of the United States before the passage of this amendment, whose husband shall have been a native-born citizen and a member of the military or naval forces of the United States during the World War, and separated therefrom under honorable conditions; if otherwise admissible, shall not be excluded from admission into the United States under section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, unless she be excluded under the provisions of that section relating to

“(a) Persons afflicted with a loathsome or dangerous contagious disease, except tuberculosis in any form;

“(bPolygamy;
"C) Prostitutes, procurers, or other like immoral persons;

"d) Persons convicted of crime: Provided, That no such wife shall be excluded because of offenses committed during legal infancy, while a minor under the age of twenty-one years, and for which the sentences imposed were less than three months, and which were committed more than five years previous to the date of the passage of this amendment;

“(e) Persons previously deported;

“That after admission to the United States she shall be subject to all other provisions of this act." 40 (46 Stat. 849; 8 U. S. C. 137a.)

NONQUOTA IMMIGRANT [Act of July 8, 1930 (46 Stat. 854), amending subd. (f), sec, 4, Act of May 28, 1924

(8 U.S. C. 204), incorporated at p. 42.] DEPORTATION OF ALIENS CONVICTED AFTER FEBRUARY 18, 1931, FOR VIOLATION OF ANY LAW REGULATING TRAFFIC IN NARCOTICS

Act approved February 18, 1931, as amended Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That any alien (except an addict who is not a dealer in, or peddler of, any of the narcotic drugs mentioned in this Act) who, after the enactment of this Act, shall be convicted for violation of or conspiracy to violate any statute of the United States or of any State, Territory, posses

Section 2 was added by the Act of October 10, 1940 (54 Stat. 1091). * This Act was repealed by the Act of May 24, 1934 (48 Stat. 797-798; 8 U. S. C. 138a), but may have effect on cases between July 3, 1930, and the date of repeal, May 24, 1934.

sion, or of the District of Columbia, taxing, prohibiting, or regulating the manufacture, production, compounding, transportation, sale, exchange, dispensing, giving away, importation, or exportation of opium, coca leaves, heroin, marihuana, or any salt, derivative, or preparation of opium or coca leaves, shall be taken into custody and deported in manner provided in sections 19 and 20 of the Act of February 5, 1917, entitled "An Act to regulate the immigration of aliens to, and the residence of aliens in, the United States.? 5° (46 Stat. 1171; 54 Stat. 673; 8 U.S. C. 156a.)

TRAVELING EXPENSES OF OFFICERS, INSPECTORS AND OTHER

EMPLOYEES ON CHANGE OF STATION ALLOWED (Act of February 21, 1931 (46 Stat. 1205), amending fourth proviso, sec. 24, Act of

February 5, 1917 (8 U. S. C. 109), incorporated at p. 30.)

COMPENSATION FOR OVERTIME SERVICE BY IMMIGRANT

INSPECTORS

Act approved March 2, 1931 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the Attorney General shall fix a reasonable rate of extra compensation for overtime services of inspectors and employees of the Immigration Service who may be required to remain on duty between the hours of five o'clock postmeridian and eight o'clock antemeridian, or on Sundays or holidays, to perform duties in connection with the examination and landing of passengers and crews of steamships, trains, airplanes, or other vehicles, arriving in the United States from a foreign port by water, land, or air, such rates to be fixed on a basis of one-half day's additional pay for each two hours or fraction thereof of at least one hour that the overtime extends beyond five o'clock postmeridian (but not to exceed two and onehalf days' pay for the full period from five o'clock postmeridian to eight o'clock antemeridian) and two additional days' pay for Sunday and holiday duty; in those ports where the customary working hours are other than those heretofore mentioned, the Attorney General is vested with authority to regulate the hours of immigration employees so as to agree with the prevailing working hours in suid ports, but nothing contained in this section shall be construed in any manner to affect or alter the length of a working day for immigration employees or the overtime pay herein fixed. : SEC. 2. The said extra compensation shall be paid by the master, owner, agent, or consignee of such vessel or other conveyance ararriving in the United States from a foreign port to the Attorney General, who shall pay the same to the several immigration officers and employees entitled thereto as provided in this Act. Such extra compensation shall be paid if such officers or employees have been ordered to report for duty and have so reported, whether the actual inspection or examination of passengers or crew takes place or not: Provided, That this section shall not apply to the inspection at designated ports of entry of passengers arriving by international ferries, bridges, or tunnels, or by aircraft, railroad trains, or vessels on the Great Lakes and connecting waterways, when operating on regular schedules. 1 (46 Stat. 1467-1468; 8 U.S. C. 109a-109b.)

30 Sec. 21, Act of June 28, 1940 (54 Stat. 673; 8 U.S. C. 156a). Sec. 22, Act of June 28. 1940 (54 Stat. 673), provides the following: "po alien shall be deportable by reason of the amendments made by section 20 or 21 on account of any act committed prior to the date of enactment of this Act."

Prior to June 28, 1940, Act of February 18, 1931 (46 Stat. 1171), read as follows: "That any alien (except an addict who is not a dealer in, or peddler of, any of the narcotic drugs mentioned in this Act) who, after the enactment of this Act shall be convicted and sentenced for violation of or conspiracy to violate any statute of the United States taxing, prohibiting, or regulating the manufacture, production, compounding, transportation, sale, exchange, dispensing, giving away, importation, or exportation of opium, coca leaves, heroin, or any salt, derivative, or preparation of opium or coca leaves shall be taken into custody and deported in manner provided in sections 19 and 20 of the Act of February 5, 1917, entitled 'An Act to regulate the immigration of aliens to, and the residence of aliens in, the United States.'"

ACT TO PAROLE UNITED STATES PRISONERS AND FOR OTHER

PURPOSES (Act of March 2, 1931 (46 Stat. 1469), amending sec. 3. Act of June 25, 1910

(18 U. s. C. 716), incorporated at p. 70.]

APPLICATION OF CONTRACT LABOR PROVISIONS OF THE IMMI. GRATION LAWS TO INSTRUMENTAL MUSICIANS

Act approved March 17, 1932 Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the contract labor provisions of the immigration laws shall be applicable to alien instrumental musicians, whether coming for permanent residence or for a temporary period.

SEC. 2. No alien instrumental musician shall, as such, be considered an “artist” or a “professional actor" within the meaning of the fifth proviso of section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917 (U. S. C., title 8, sec. 136 (h), second proviso) unless_62

(1) he is of distinguished merit and ability as an instrumental musician, or is a member of a musical organization of distinguished merit and is applying for admission as such; and

(2) his professional engagements (or, if the exemption is claimed on account of membership in an organization, the professional engagements of such organization within the United States are of a character requiring superior talent.

Sec. 3. In the case of an alien instrumental musician coming for a temporary period, who is exempted from the contract labor provisions of the immigration laws by the fifth proviso of section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917 as limited by section 2 of this Act, his admission to the United States shall be under such conditions as may be by regulations prescribed by the Attorney General (including where deemed necessary the giving of bond with sufficient surety) to insure that at the termination of his contract he will depart from the United States. (47 Stat. 67; 8 U. S. C. 137b-137d.)

TO AUTHORIZE EXPENDITURES FOR THE ENFORCEMENT OF THE

CONTRACT LABOR PROVISIONS OF THE IMMIGRATION LAW [Act of May 2, 1932 (47 Stat. 145), amending sec. 24, Act of February 5, 1917

(8 U. S. C. 109), incorporated at p. 30.)

01 See also Act of August 22, 1940 (54 Stat. 858; 8 U. S. C. 109c), p. 118, for other provisions covering compensation for overtime service.

62 See also fifth proviso of sec. 3, Act of February 5, 1917 (39 Stat. 876 ; 8 U. S. C. 136), p. 6, for other provisions covering contract labor relative to professional actors and artists.

CHANGING THE NAME OF THE ISLAND PORTO RICO TO

PUERTO RICO (Act of May 17, 1932 (47 Stat. 158), amending Act of May 26, 1926 (8 U. 8. C. 231),

incorporated at p. 91.)

CERTAIN DEPORTED ALIENS MAY REENTER AFTER EXPIRATION

OF ONE YEAR, APPROVAL OF APPLICATION NECESSARY (Act of May 25, 1932 (47 Stat. 166), amending subd. (a), sec. 1, Act of March 4, 1929

(8 U. S. C, 181), incorporated at p. 93.)

ACT RELATING TO THE IMMIGRATION AND NATURALIZATION OF

CERTAIN NATIVES OF THE VIRGIN ISLANDS OF THE UNITED STATES

Act approved June 28, 1932 NATIVE OF VIRGIN ISLANDS RESIDING IN A FOREIGN COUNTRY Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That a native of the Virgin Islands of the United States who is now residing in any foreign country shall for the purpose of the Immigration Act of 1924,

as amended, be considered as a nonquota immigrant for the purposes of admission to the United States; but shall be subject to all the other provisions of that Act and of the immigration laws, except that

(a) He shall not be subject to the head tax imposed by section 2 of the Immigration Act of 1917;

(b) He shall not be required to have a passport or immigration visa;

(c) If otherwise admissible, he shall not be excluded under section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1917, unless excluded under the provisions of that section relating to

(1) Persons afflicted with a loathsome or dangerous contagious disease;

(2) Polygamy;
(3) Prostitutes, procurers, or other like immoral persons;
(4) Contract laborers;
5) Persons previously deported; or
(6) Persons convicted of crime.
(47 Stat. 336; 8 U.S. C. 204a.)

LIMITATION ON OPERATION OF SECTION 1 Sec. 2. The foregoing provisions of this Act shall not apply to any such alien after the expiration of two years following the enactment of this Act. (47 Stat. 336; 8 U. S. C. 204b.)

DEPORTATION AS PUBLIC CHARGE Sec. 3. An alien admitted to the United States under this Act shall not be subject to deportation on the ground that he has become a public charge.' (47 Stat. 336; 8 U.S. C. 204c.)

DEFINITIONS SEC. 4. Terms defined in the Immigration Act of 1924, as amended, shall, when used in this Act, have the meaning assigned to such terms in that Act. (47 Stat. 336; 8 U.S. C. 204d.)

TO SECURE THE DEPARTURE OF CERTAIN ALIENS FROM THE

UNITED STATES [Act of July 1, 1982 (47 Stat. 524-525), amending sec. 18, Act of May 26, 1924

(8 U. 8. C. 215), incorporated at p. 64. )

NONIMMIGRANT STATUS OF CERTAIN ALIENS (Act of July 6, 1932 (47 Stat. 607-608), amending sec. 8(6), Act of May 26, 1924

(8 U. S. C. 203), incorporated at p. 41.]

TO EXEMPT FROM THE QUOTA HUSBANDS OF AMERICAN

CITIZENS (Act of July 11, 1932 (47 Stat. 656), amending subd. (a), sec. 4, and Clause (A), par.

(1), subd. (a), sec. 6, Act of May 26, 1924 (8 U. S. C. 204, 206 (a)), incorporated at pp. 42 and 43.]

APPLICATION OF IMMIGRATION LAWS TO CITIZENS OF THE

PHILIPPINE ISLANDS

Act approved March 24, 1934, as amended [This act was accepted by concurrent resolution of the Philippine Legislature on May 1, 1934, and became effective on that date. It is entitled "An Act to provide for the complete independence of the Philippine Islands, to provide for the adoption of a constitution and a form of government for the Philippine Islands, and for other purposes.” Section 8 of the act reads as follows:]

(1) For the purposes of the Immigration Act of 1917, the Immigration Act of 1924 (except section 13 (c)), this section, and all other laws of the United States relating to the immigration, exclusion, or expulsion of aliens, citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States shall be considered as if they were aliens. For such purposes the Philippine Islands shall be considered as a separate country and shall have for each fiscal year a quota of fifty. This paragraph shall not apply to a person coming or seeking to come to the Territory of Hawaii who does not apply for and secure an immigration or passport visa, but such immigration shall be determined by the Department of the Interior on the basis of the needs of industries in the Territory of Hawaii.

(2) Citizens of the Philippine Islands who are not citizens of the United States shall not be admitted to the Continental United States from the Territory of Hawaii (whether entering such Territory before or after the effective date of this section) unless they belong to a class declared to be nonimmigrants by section 3 of the Immigration Act of 1924 or to a class declared to be nonquota immigrants under the provisions of section 4 of such Act other than subdivision (c) thereof, or unless they were admitted to such territory under an immigration visa. The Attorney General shall by regulations provide a method for such exclusion and for the admission of such excepted classes.

(3) Any Foreign Service officer may be assigned to duty in the Philippine Islands, under a commission as a consular officer, for such period as may be necessary and under such regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, during which assignment such officer shall be considered as stationed in a foreign country; but his powers and duties shall be confined to the performance of such of the official acts and notarial and other services, which such officer

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