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prospect for chlorides, sulphates, carbonates, borates, silicates, or nitrates of potassium in lands belonging to the United States for a period of not exceeding two years: Provided, That the area to be included in such a permit shall not exceed two thousand five hundred and sixty acres of land in reasonably compact form: Provided further, That the prospecting provisions of this Act [30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285] shall not apply to lands and deposits in or adjacent to Searles Lake, California, which lands may be leased by the Secretary of the Interior under the terms and provisions of this Act. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 1, 44 Stat. 1057; 30 U.S. C., sec. 281.)

1615. Leases to permittees of lands showing valuable deposits; roy. alty.–That upon showing to the satisfaction of the Secretary of the Interior that valuable deposits of one of the substances enumerated in this Act [30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285) has been discovered by the permittee within the area covered by his permit, and that such land is chiefly valuable therefor, the permittee shall be entitled to a lease for any or all of the land embraced in the prospecting permit, at a royalty of not less than 2 per centum of the quantity or gross value of the output of potassium compounds and other related products, except sodium, at the point of shipment to market, such lease to be taken in compact form by legal subdivisions of the public-land surveys, or if the land be not surveyed, by survey executed at the cost of the permittee in accordance with regulations prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 2, 44 Stat. 1057; 30 U.S. C., sec. 282.)

1616. Lands containing valuable deposits and not covered by permits or leases; authority to lease; conditions; partial exemptions from rental and royalty of leases resulting from prospecting permits. That lands known to contain valuable deposits enumerated in this Act [30 U.S. C., secs. 281–285] and not covered by permits or leases shall be held subject to lease by the Secretary of the Interior through advertisement, competitive bidding, or such other methods as he may by general regulations adopt, and in such areas as he shall fix, not exceeding two thousand five hundred and sixty acres; all leases to be conditioned upon the payment by the lessee of such royalty as may be fixed in the lease, not less than 2 per centum of the quantity or gross value of the output of potassium compounds and other related products, except sodium, at the point of shipment to market, and the payment in advance of a rental of 25 cents per acre for the first calendar year or fraction thereof; 50 cents per acre for the second, third, fourth, and fifth years, respectively; and $1 per acre per annum thereafter during the continuance of the lease, such rental for any year being credited against royalties accruing for that year. Leases under this Act [30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285] shall be for a period of 20 years, with preferential right in the lessee to renew the same for successive periods of ten years upon such reasonable terms and conditions as may be prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior, unless otherwise provided by law at the expiration of such periods. In the discretion of the Secretary of the Interior the area involved in any lease resulting from a prospecting permit may be exempt from any rental in excess of 25 cents per acre for twenty years succeeding its issue, and the production of potassium compounds under such a lease may be exempt from any royalty in excess of the minimum prescribed in this Act (30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285] for the same period. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 3, 44 Stat. 1057; 30 U.S. C., sec. 283.)

1617. Lands containing coal or other minerals in addition to potassium deposits; issuance of prospecting permits and leases; covenants in potassium leases.—That prospecting permits or leases may be issued under the provisions of this Act (30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285] for deposits of potassium in public lands, also containing deposits of coal or other minerals, on condition that such other deposits be reserved to the United States for disposal under appropriate laws: Provided, That if the interests of the Government and of the lessee will be subserved thereby, potassium leases may include covenants providing for the development by the lessee of chlorides, sulphates, carbonates, borates, silicates, or nitrates of sodium, magnesium, aluminum, or calcium, associated with the potassium deposits leased, on terms and conditions not inconsistent with the sodium provisions of the Act of February 25, 1920 (Forty-first Statutes at Large, page 437) [30 U. S. C., secs. 261, 263]: Provided further, That where valuable deposits of mineral now subject to disposition under the general mining laws are found in fissure veins on any of the lands subject to permit or lease under this Act (30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285], the valuable minerals so found shall continue subject to disposition under the said general mining laws notwithstanding the presence of potash therein. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 4, 44 Stat. 1058; 30 U. S. C., sec. 284.)

1618. Laws applicable.—That the general provisions of sections 1 and 26 to 38, inclusive, of the Act of February 25, 1920, entitled “An Act to promote the mining of coal, phosphate, oil, oil shale, gas, and sodium on the public domain ” [30 U. S. C., secs. 181–194], are made applicable to permits and leases under this Act (30 U. S. C., secs. 281–285], the first and thirty-seventh sections thereof being amended to include deposits of potassium. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 5, 44 Stat. 1058; 30 U.S. C., sec. 285.)

1619. Repeal of act authorizing exploration for and disposition of potassium.-That the Act of October 2, 1917 (Fortieth Statutes at Large, page 297), entitled “An Act to authorize exploration for and disposition of potassium ” [30 U. S. C., secs. 141-152], is hereby repealed, but this repeal shall not affect pending applications for permits or leases filed prior to January 1, 1926, or valid claims existent at date of the passage of this Act and thereafter maintained in compliance with the laws under which initiated, which claims may be perfected under such laws, including discovery. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 6, 44 Stat. 1058; 30 U. S. C., sec. 286.)

1620. Extension of prospecting permits.-Any prospecting permit issued under this Act (30 U. S. C., secs. 281-285) may be extended by the Secretary of the Interior for a period not exceeding two years, upon a showing of satisfactory cause. (Feb. 7, 1927, sec. 7 as added May 7, 1932, sec. 7, 47 Stat. 151; 30 U. S. C., sec. 287.) LEASE OF OIL OR GAS DEPOSITS IN OR UNDER RAILROADS AND OTHER RIGHTS

OF-WAY 1621. Authorization for lease of oil and gas deposits.—That whenever the Secretary of the Interior shall deem it to be consistent with the public interest he is authorized to lease deposits of oil and gas in or under lands embraced in railroad or other rights-of-way acquired under any law of the United States, whether the same be a base

fee or mere easement: Provided, That, except as hereinafter authorized, no lease shall be executed hereunder except to the municipality, corporation, firm, association, or individual by whom such right-ofway was acquired, or to the lawful successor, assignee, or transferee of such municipality, corporation, firm, association, or individual. (May 21, 1930, sec. 1, 46 Stat. 373; 30 U.S. C., sec. 301.)

1622. Ássignment of lease; subletting.—That the right conferred by this Act may, subject to the approval of the Secretary of the Interior, be assigned or sublet by the owner thereof to any corporation, firm, association, or individual. (May 21, 1930, sec. 2, 46 Stat. 373; 30 U. S. C., sec. 302.)

1623. Conditions precedent to award of lease; preferred class; bidding.–That prior to the award of any lease under section 1 of this Act (30 U. S. C., sec. 301], the Secretary of the Interior shall notify the owner or lessee of adjoining lands and allow him a reasonable time, to be fixed in the notice given, within which to submit an offer or bid of the amount or percentage of compensatory royalty that such owner will agree to pay for the extraction through wells on his or its adjoining land, of the oil or gas under and from such adjoining right-of-way, and at the same time afford the holder of the railroad or other right-of-way a like opportunity within the same time to submit its bid or offer as to the amount or percentage of royalty it will agree to pay, if a lease for the extraction of the oil and gas deposits under the right-of-way be awarded to the holder of such right-of-way. In case of competing offers by the said parties in interest, the Secretary shall award the right to extract the oil and gas to the bidder, duly qualified, making the offer in his opinion most advantageous to the United States. In case but one bid or offer is received after notice duly given, he may, in his discretion award the right to extract the oil and gas to such bidder. (May 21, 1930, sec. 3, 46 Stat. 374; 30 U. S. C., sec. 303.)

1624. Provisions authorized in lease.— That any lease granted by the Secretary of the Interior pursuant to this Act may, in the discretion of said Secretary, contain a provision giving the lessee the right, with the approval of said Secretary, to shut down the operation of any well or wells the operation of which has become unprofitable, to resume operations when such resumption may result in profit, and to abandon any, well or wells that cease to produce oil and/or gas in paying quantities. (May 21, 1930, sec. 4, 46 Stat. 374; 30 U. S. C., sec. 304.)

1625. Royalties.—That the royalty to be paid to the United States under any lease to be issued, or agreement made pursuant to this Act, shall be determined by the Secretary of the Interior, in no case to be less than 1242 per centum in amount or value of the production, nor for more than twenty years: Provided, That when the oil or gas is produced from land adjacent to the right-of-way the amount or value of the royalty to be paid to the United States shall be within the discretion of the Secretary of the Interior: Provided further, That when the daily average production of any oil well does not exceed ten barrels per day said Secretary may, in his discretion, reduce the royalty on subsequent production. (May 21, 1930, sec. 5, 46 Stat. 374; 30 Ú. S. C., sec. 305.)

1626. Rules and regulations.—That the Secretary of the Interior is authorized and directed to adopt rules and regulations governing the exercise of the discretion and authority conferred by this Act, which rules and regulations shall constitute a part of any application or lease hereunder. (May 21, 1930, sec. 6, 46 Stat. 374; 30 U. S. C., sec. 306.)

MONEY AND FINANCE

NATIONAL BUDGET AND AUDIT SYSTEM

THE BUDGET 1627. President to transmit Budget to Congress; contents.—The President shall transmit to Congress on the first day of each regular session,

the Budget, which shall set forth in summary and in detail: (a) Estimates of the expenditures and appropriations necessary in his judgment for the support of the Government for the ensuing fiscal year; except that the estimates for such year for the Legislative Branch of the Government and the Supreme Court of the United States shall be transmitted to the President on or before October 15th of each year, and shall be included by him in the Budget without revision;

(b) His estimates of the receipts of the Government during the ensuing fiscal year, under (1) laws existing at the time the Budget is transmitted and also (2) under the revenue proposals, if any, contained in the Budget;

(c) The expenditures and receipts of the Government during the last completed fiscal year;

(d) Estimates of the expenditures and receipts of the Government during the fiscal year in progress;

(e) The amount of annual, permanent, or other appropriations, including balances of appropriations for prior fiscal years, available for expenditure during the fiscal year in progress, as of November 1 of each year;

(f) Balanced statements of (1) the condition of the Treasury at the end of the last completed fiscal year, (2) the estimated condition of the Treasury at the end of the fiscal year in progress, and (3) the estimated condition of the Treasury at the end of the ensuing fiscal year if the financial proposals contained in the Budget are adopted;

(g) All essential facts regarding the bonded and other indebtedness of the Government; and

(h) Such other financial statements and data as in his opinion are necessary or desirable in order to make known in all practicable detail the financial condition of the Government. (June 10, 1921, sec. 201, 42 Stat. 20; 31 U.S. C., sec. 11.)

1628. Recommendations of President accompanying Budget.-(a) If the estimated receipts for the ensuing fiscal year contained in the Budget, on the basis of laws existing at the time the Budget is transmitted, plus the estimated amounts in the Treasury at the close of the fiscal year in progress, available for expenditure in the ensuing fiscal year, are less than the estimated expenditures for the ensuing fiscal year contained in the Budget, the President in the Budget shall make recommendations to Congress for new taxes, loans, or other appropriate action to meet the estimated deficiency.

(b) If the aggregate of such estimated receipts and such estimated amounts in the Treasury is greater than such estimated expenditures for the ensuing, fiscal year, he shall make such recommendations as in his opinion the public interests require. (June 10, 1921, sec. 202, 42 Stat. 21; 31 U.S. C., sec. 13.)

1629. Supplemental or deficiency estimates.-(a) The President from time to time may transmit to Congress supplemental or deficiency estimates for such appropriations or expenditures as in his judgment (1) are necessary on account of laws enacted after the transmission of the Budget, or (2) are otherwise in the public interest. He shall accompany such estimates with a statement of the reasons therefor, including the reasons for their omission from the Budget.

(b) Whenever such supplemental or deficiency estimates reach an aggregate which, if they had been contained in the Budget, would have required 'the President to make a recommendation under subdivision (a) of section 202 [31 U. S. C., sec. 13], he shall thereupon make such recommendation. (June 10, 1921, sec. 203, 42 Stat. 21; 31 U. S. C., sec. 14.)

1630. Estimates or requests for appropriations, etc., not to be submitted by officers or employees unless at request.-No estimate or request for an appropriation and no request for an increase in an item of any such estimate or request, and no recommendation as to how the revenue needs of the Government should be met, shall be submitted to Congress or any committee thereof by any officer or employee of any department or establishment, unless at the request of either House of Congress. (June 10, 1921, sec. 206, 42 Stat. 21; 31 U. S. C., sec. 15.)

1631. Bureau of Budget; Director and Assistant Director.-There is hereby created in the Treasury Department a Bureau to be known as the Bureau of the Budget. There shall be in the Bureau a Director and an Assistant Director, who shall be appointed by the President and receive salaries of $10,000 and $7,500 a year, respectively. The Assistant Director shall perform such duties as the Director may designate, and during the absence or incapacity of the Director or during a vacancy in the office of Director he shall act as Director. The Bureau, under such rules and regulations as the President may prescribe, shall prepare for him the Budget, the alternative Budget, and any supplemental or deficiency estimates, and to this end shall have authority to assemble, correlate, revise, reduce, or increase the estimates of the several departments or establishments. (June 10, 1921, sec. 207, 42 Stat. 22; 31 U. S. C., sec. 16.)

1632. Detailed study of departments and establishments by Bureau. The Bureau, when directed by the President, shall make a detailed study of the departments and establishments for the purpose of enabling the President to determine what changes (with a view of securing greater economy and efficiency in the conduct of the public service) should be made in (1) the existing organization, activities, and methods of business of such departments or establishments, (2) the appropriations therefor, (3) the assignment of particular activities to particular services, or (4) the regrouping of services. The results of such study shall be embodied in a report or reports to the President, who may transmit to Congress such report or reports or any part thereof with his recommendations on the matters covered thereby. (June 10, 1921, sec. 209, 42 Stat. 22; 31 U. S. C., sec. 18.)

1633. Aid and information for committees of Congress.—The Bureau shall, at the request of any committee of either House of Congress

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