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ings and the execution and delivery of a good and sufficient bond to the effect that such hampers, baskets, or parts thereof shall not be sold or used contrary to law. The proceeds of any sale under this section, less legal costs and charges, shall be paid over to the person entitled thereto. The proceedings in such seizure cases shall conform as near as may be to the proceedings in admiralty, except that either party may demand trial by jury of any issue of fact joined in such case, and all such proceedings shall be at the suit and in the name of the United States. (May 21, 1928, sec. 6, 45 Stat. 686; 15 U. S. C., sec. 257e.)

666. Hampers and baskets for foreign countries. That this Act shall not prohibit the manufacture for sale or shipment, offer for sale, or shipment of hampers, round stave baskets, splint baskets, or parts thereof, to any foreign country in accordance with the specifications of a foreign consignee or customer not contrary to the law of such foreign country; nor shall this Act prevent the manufacture of banana hampers of the shape and character now in commercial use as shipping containers for bananas. (May 21, 1928, sec. 7, 45 Stat. 687; 15 U. S. C., sec. 257f.)

667. Duty of United States attorneys.—That it shall be the duty of each United States district attorney to whom satisfactory evidence of any violation of this Act is presented to cause appropriate proceedings to be commenced and prosecuted in the proper courts of the United States in his district for the enforcement of the provisions of this Act. (May 21, 1928, sec. 8, 45 Stat. 687; 15 U. S. C., sec. 257g.)

668. Regulations; examination; tests.—That the Secretary of Agriculture shall prescribe such regulations as he may find necessary for carrying into effect the provisions of this Act, and shall cause such examinations and tests to be made as may be necessary in order to determine whether hampers, round stave baskets, and splint baskets, or parts thereof, subject to this Act, meet the requirements, and may take samples of such hampers, baskets, or parts thereof, the cost of which samples, upon request, shall be paid to the person entitled. (May 21, 1928, sec. 9, 45 Stat. 687; 15 U. S. C., sec. 257h.)

669. Carrying out purpose of statute; authority of Secretary; cooperation.—That for carrying out the purposes of this Act the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to cooperate with State, county, and municipal authorities, manufacturers, dealers, and shippers, to employ such persons and means, and to pay such expenses, including rent, printing publications, and the purchase of supplies and equipment in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, as he shall find to be necessary, and there are hereby authorized to be appropriated, out of any moneys in the Treasury not otherwise appropriated, such sums as may be necessary for such purposes. (May 21, 1928, sec. 10, 45 Stat. 687; 15 U. S. C., sec. 257i.)

670. Effective date of sections 5 and 6.—That sections 5 and 6 of this Act (15 U. S. C., secs. 257 d, e) shall become effective at but not before the expiration of one year following the 1st day of November, next, succeeding the passage of this Act. (May 21, 1928, sec. 11, 45 Stat. 687.)

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THE WEATHER BUREAU

671. Establishment of the Weather Bureau.—That the civilian duties now performed by the Signal Corps of the Army shall hereafter devolve upon a bureau to be known as the Weather Bureau, which, on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, shall be established in and attached to the Department of Agriculture, and the Signal Corps of the Army shall remain a part of the Military Establishment under the direction of the Secretary of War, and all estimates for its support shall be included with other estimates for the support of the Military Establishment. (Oct. 1, 1890, sec. 1, 26 Stat. 653; 15 U. S. C., sec. 311.)

672. Chief and employees.—That the Weather Bureau shall hereafter consist of one Chief of Weather Bureau and such civilian employees as Congress may annually provide for and as may be necessary to properly perform the duties devolving on said bureau by law, and the chief of said bureau shall be appointed by the President, by and with the advice and consent of the Senate. (Oct 1, 1890, sec. 4, 26 Stat. 653; July 8, 1898, 30 Stat. 752; 15 U.S. C., sec 312.)

673. Duties of Chief of Bureau. That the Chief of the Weather Bureau, under the direction of the Secretary of Agriculture, on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one shall have charge of the forecasting of weather, the issue of storm warnings, the display of weather and flood signals for the benefit of agriculture, commerce, and navigation, the gauging and reporting of rivers, the maintenance and operation of sea-coast telegraph lines and the collection and transmission of marine intelligence for the benefit of commerce and navigation, the reporting of temperature and rainfall conditions for the cotton interests, the display of frost and cold-wave signals, the distribution of meteorological information in the interests of agriculture and commerce, and the taking of such meteorological observations as may be necessary to establish and record the climatic conditions of the United States, or as are essential for the proper execution of the foregoing duties.

Within the limits of the appropriations which may be made for such purpose, it shall be the duty of the Chief of the Weather Bureau, under the direction of the Secretary of Agriculture, (a) to furnish such weather reports, forecasts, warnings, and advices as may be required to promote the safety and efficiency of air navigation in the United States and above the high seas, particularly upon civil airways designated by the Secretary of Commerce under authority of law as routes suitable for air commerce, and (b) for such purposes to observe, measure, and investigate atmospheric phenomena, and establish meteorological offices and stations. (Oct. 1, 1890, sec. 3, 26 Stat. 653; May 20, 1926, sec. 5 (e), 44 Stat. 571; 15 U. S. C., sec. 313. 674. Promotions.

The Secretary is hereby authorized to make promotions in the service without prejudice to those transferred from the Signal Service of the War Department. (Aug. 8, 1894, 28 Stat. 273; 15 U. S. C., sec. 314.)

675. Changes or assignment to duty. - * * The Secretary is hereby authorized to make such changes or assignment to duty in the personnel or detailed force of the Weather Bureau for limiting or reducing expenses as he may deem necessary. (Mar. 2, 1895, 28 Stat. 736; 15 U. S. C., sec. 315.)

676. Traveling expenses.—Hereafter officials and employees of the Weather Bureau, when transferred from one station to another for official duty, shall be allowed all traveling expenses authorized by existing laws applicable to said bureau, notwithstanding any changes in appointments that may be required by such transfers. (Mar. 4, 1913, 37 Stat. 830; 15 U. S. C., sec. 316.)

677. Appropriations. That on and after July first, eighteen hundred and ninety-one, the appropriations for the

support of the Weather Bureau shall be made with those of the other bureaus of the Department of Agriculture, and it shall be the duty of the Secretary of Agriculture to prepare future estimates for the Weather Bureau which shall be hereafter specially developed and extended in the interests of agriculture. (Oct. 1, 1890, sec. 9, 26 Stat. 653; 15 U. S. C., sec. 317.)

678. Weather signals on mail cars.—That the Secretary of Agriculture, in cooperation with the Postmaster-General, may arrange a plan by which there shall be displayed on all cars and other conveyances used for transporting United States mail, suitable flags or other signals to indicate weather forecasts, cold-wave warnings, frost warnings, and so forth, to be furnished by the Chief of the Weather Bureau. (Apr. 25, 1896, 29 Stat. 108; 15 U.S. C., sec. 318.)

679. Sale of maps or publications. Hereafter the Secretary of Agriculture is authorized to sell any surplus maps or publications of the Weather Bureau, and the money received from such sales shall be deposited in the Treasury of the United States, section two hundred and twenty-seven of the Revised Statutes notwithstanding. (Mar. 4, 1907, 34 Stat. 1258; 15 U. S. C., sec. 320.)

680. Destruction of old telegrams.—That hereafter all telegrams pertaining to the business of the Weather Bureau may be destroyed after they are three years old, and the accounts based thereon have been settled by the General Accounting Office. (May 25, 1900, 31 Stat. 204; June 10, 1921, sec. 304, 42 Stat. 24; 15 U.S.C., sec. 321.)

681. Meteorological information to be furnished by Hydrographic Office to Navy Department.-And hereafter the pilot charts prepared in the Hydrographic Office shall have conspicuously printed thereon the following: “Prepared from data furnished by the Hydrographic Office of the Navy Department and by the Weather Bureau of the Department of Agriculture, and published at the Hydrographic Office under the authority of the Secretary of the Navy"; and all meteorological information received by the Weather Bureau of the Department of Agriculture necessary for and of the character of such information heretofore used in the preparation of the pilot charts shall continue to be furnished with all possible expedition to the Hydrographic Office for use in the preparation of said charts. (June 17, 1910, 36 Stat. 508.)

FEDERAL CAUSTIC POISON ACT

682. Citation.—That this Act may be cited as the Federal Caustic Poison Act. (Mar. 4, 1927, sec. 1, 44 Stat. 1406; 15 U.S.C., sec. 401.)

683. Definitions.--As used in this Act, unless the context otherwise requires

(a) The term “ dangerous caustic or corrosive substance” means:

(1) Hydrochloric acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized hydrochloric acid (HCI) in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(2) Sulphuric acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized sulphuric acid (H2SO.) in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(3) Nitric acid or any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized nitric acid (HNO3) in a concentration of 5 per centum or more;

(4) Carbolic acid (CH-OH), otherwise known as phenol, and any preparation containing carbolic acid in a concentration of 5 per centum or more;

(5) Oxalic acid and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized oxalic acid (H.C,0.) in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(6) Any salt of oxalic acid and any preparation containing any such salt in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(7) Acetic acid or any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized acetic acid (HC,H,O2) in a concentration of 20 per centum or more;

(8) Hypochlorous acid, either free or combined, and any preparation containing the same in a concentration so as to yield 10 per centum or more by weight of available chlorine, excluding calx chlorinata, bleaching powder, and chloride of lime;

(9) Potassium hydroxide and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized potassium hydroxide (KOH), including caustic potash and Vienna paste, in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(10) Sodium hydroxide and any preparation containing free or chemically unneutralized sodium hydroxide (NaOH), including caustic soda and lye, in a concentration of 10 per centum or more;

(11) Silver nitrate, sometimes known as lunar caustic, and any preparation containing silver nitrate (AgNO3) in a concentration of per centum or more;

and (12) Ammonia water and any preparation containing free or chemically uncombined ammonia (NH3), including ammonium hydroxide and " hartshorn”, in a concentration of 5 per centum or more.

(b) The term “ misbranded parcel, package, or container" means a retail parcel, package, or container of any dangerous caustic or corrosive substance not bearing a conspicuous, easily legible label or sticker, containing

(1) The common name of the substance; (2) The name and place of business of the manufacturer, packer, seller, or distributor;

(3) The word “poison”, running parallel with the main body of reading matter on the label or sticker, on a clear, plain background of a distinctly contrasting color, in uncondensed gothic capital letters, the letters to be not less than twenty-four point size unless there is on the label or sticker no other type so large, in which event the type shall be not smaller than the largest type on the label or sticker; and

(4) Directions for treatment in case of accidental personal injury by any dangerous caustic or corrosive substance, except that such directions need not appear on labels or stickers, on parcels, packages, or containers at the time of shipment or of delivery for shipment by manufacturers and wholesalers for other than household use.

(c) The term “interstate or foreign commerce” means commerce between any State, Territory, or possession, or the District of Columbia, and any place outside thereof; or between points within the same State, Territory, or possession, or the District of Columbia, but through any place outside thereof, or within any Territory or possession, or the District of Columbia'.

(d) This Act is not to be construed as modifying or limiting in any way the right of any person to manufacture, pack, ship, sell, barter, and distribute dangerous caustic or corrosive substances in parcels, packages, or containers, labeled as required by this Act. (Mar. 4, 1927, sec. 2, 44 Stat. 1406; 15 U.S. C., sec. 402.)

684. Prohibition against misbranded shipments.- No person shall ship or deliver for shipment in interstate or foreign commerce or receive from shipment in such commerce any dangerous caustic or corrosive substance for sale or exchange, or sell or offer for sale any such substance in any Territory or possession or in the District of Columbia, in a misbranded parcel, package, or container suitable for household use; except that the preceding provisions of this section shall not apply

(a) To any regularly established common carrier shipping or delivering for shipment, or receiving from shipment, any such substance in the ordinary course of its business as a common carrier; nor

(b) To any person in respect of any such substance shipped or delivered for shipment, or received from shipment, for export to any foreign country, in a parcel, package, or container branded in accordance with the specifications of a foreign purchaser and in accordance with the laws of the foreign country.

(c) To any dealer when he can establish a guaranty signed by the wholesaler, jobber, manufacturer, or other party residing in the United States, from whom he purchases such articles, to the effect that the article is not misbranded within the meaning of this Act. This guaranty, to afford protection, shall contain the name and address of the party or parties making the sale of such article to such dealer, and in such case said party or parties shall be amenable to the prosecutions, fines, and other penalties which would attach, in due course, to the dealer under the provisions of this Act. (Mar. 4, 1927, sec. 3, 44 Stat. 1407; 15 U. S. C., sec. 403.)

685. Libel for condemnation proceedings.-(a) Any dangerous caustic or corrosive substance in a misbranded parcel, package, or container suitable for household use shall be liable to be proceeded against in the district court of the United States for any judicial district in which the substance is found and to be seized for confiscation by a process of libel for condemnation, if such substance is being

(1) Shipped in interstate or foreign commerce, or (2) Held for sale or exchange after having been so shipped, or

(3) Held for sale or exchange in any Territory or possession or in the District of Columbia.

(b) If such substance is condemned as misbranded by the court it shall be disposed of in the discretion of the court

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