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THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE
HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

EIGHTY-FIRST CONGRESS

SECOND SESSION

FEBRUARY 7, 8, 10, 14, AND 24, MARCH 8, 9, 10, 14, AND 29,
APRIL 26, AND JUNE 9 AND 13, 1950

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228, 347

Taylor, Keith, chairman, Statewide Long Staple Cotton Committee
of the Arizona Cooperative Cotton Growers Association, Phoenix,
Ariz

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Mahon, Hon. George, Member of Congress from Texas.

Paden, Raymond A., Hanford, Calif

Woolley, Frank K., assistant administrator, Production and Marketing
Administration, Department of Agriculture.-

Statements submitted by-

California Farm Bureau Federation

Davis, Roy B., Plains Cooperative Oil Mill, Lubbock, Tex....

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COTTON PROGRAM

TUESDAY, FEBRUARY 7, 1950

HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES,

SUBCOMMITTEE OF THE COMMITTEE ON AGRICULTURE,
Washington, D. C.

Mr. PACE. The committee will please come to order.

Before the committee begins its hearings this morning, I am advised that Mr. Russell Smith, executive secretary of the National Farmers' Union, is here and has with him some of his friends whom we are delighted to find present.

Mr. Smith, we would be delighted if you would present them at this time.

Mr. SMITH. Thank you, Mr. Chairman. These farm people are from North Dakota. They are a part of the annual visitation of the Nation's capital by Farmers' Union members who have earned the trip by getting 75 or more members signed up in the Farmers' Union. As some of you know, of course, Congressman Pace was kind enough to speak to us 2 weeks ago, to another group. These visits continue every week through most of the winter, with from 100 to 200 of these farm people coming in here to see how the Government works. They know, of course, that you are considering the cotton bill this morning. I suppose some of them have not yet seen cotton, much less growing in North Dakota.

From talking with them, I know that the problems that you are trying to deal with in relation to the cotton south are fundamentally the same problems that they face in the wheat country. In other words, you have the basic struggle of the family farmer to stay on the land and to make a decent living. The question of minimum acreage allotments concerns them just as deeply as it does the South. They are here to have a look at a subcommitteee in action. They appreciate very much this opportunity.

I will not take up the committee's time further except to say that I wish you, Mr. Chairman, would name the members of the subcommittee for these visitors so they can get acquainted with them facially.

Mr. PACE. Ladies and gentlemen, the committee feels highly complimented that you should pay us a visit this morning. We hope you will be able to stay a little while. We are beginning this morning a review of an act of the last Congress dealing with acreage allotments and marketing quotas on cotton. As you all know, it is rather troublesome and displeasing to everyone to have to limit the production of any commodity, but this committee is committed to the principle that the Government should provide the agricultural producers of the Nation a reasonable support on the crops they produce.

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