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The CHAIRMAN. We can get that. Now, pick up at your next heading, “Sales.” Mr. FLOETE. Before you leave that subject, Mr. Chairman, a large part of the Navy requirement is for public domain. That is what runs it up so high. It is largely at Twentynine Palms, Calif.

There is one other item at Lemoore, which is also in California, which is a new master jet station that the Navy proposes to build, and we have been trying to find some existing closed Army installations that could be used in lieu of that. Mr. Ewing, my deputy, went out there last week and spent 3 days there, and we are particularly looking at Camp Cook, which is just north of Santa Barbara and is a fine camp, but it is purely a mobilization camp.

There are four closed camps between Santa Barabara and Monterey, and it does seem to me there is some way we ought to be able to utilize one of those, and Camp Cook seems to fill the bill. We are trying to work it out with the Army and the Navy right now.

The CHAIRMAN. We are trying to develop that same line of thought and when we get to that item, we will try to see if we cannot use some existing facility to take the place of establishing this new base at Lemoore, Calif.

Mr. DURHAM. What is the total acreage, Mr. Secretary, in those four closed installations?

Mr. FLOETE. There is 85,000 acres in Camp Cook. There is about 50,000 acres at Camp Roberts I was there at Christmastime. There is about 150,000 in Hunter Liggett, that is owned in fee, and about another 100,000 acres that we occupy under permit from—I think it is the Forestry Service, but it might be Interior.

The CHAIRMAN. I think, members of the committee, we will be able to make a case to justify the use of some

Mr. Durham. Let him give the total acreage. He has not finished, Mr. Chairman.

Mr. FLOETE. Well, that covers it, and then there is a smaller one of about 25,000 acres. Mr. DURHAM. You have over 300,000 acres in those closed camps ? Mr. FLOETE. Yes, sir. The CHAIRMAN. Now, Mr. Floete, go ahead now with "Sales." Mr. FLOETE. At the top of page 6: In August 1955, Department of Defense directive was issued establishing policy as to the retention of real property by the military departments; establishing guidelines under which such property will be retained or reported excess; and initiating a review of all real property holdings within the military departments.

Reports concerning inactive nonindustrial installations are due on February 27, 1956; reports on all industrial, all active nonindustrial, and all foreign installations are to be submitted by August 27, 1956. Thereafter similar reports are required each 2 years.

The following excess declarations have been made to the General Services Administration:

Number of
declara-
tions

Original

Cst (in thousands)

Fiscal year 1954.
Piscal year 1955
Fiscal year 1956 (first 4 months).

56
220
85

$62, 874

3, 730 28, 124 Total program deficit.

The guidelines which were incorporated in this directive, we worked on a long time. We worked in conjunction with the three military departments, and we believe they are sound and sensible directives that will set good standards as to retention.

Mr. DURHAM. Are those reports required by law, presently?
Mr. FLOETE. No, sir.
Mr. DURHAM. It is just by Executive order?
Mr. FLOETE. Yes, sir.
The CHAIRMAN. Now, take up “Housing."

Mr. FLOETE. Family Housing. Attached chart B is a set of tables showing the present family housing situation based on worldwide military strengths of 2,859,000.

(The chart referred to follows:)

CHART B

ASSISTANT SECRETARY OF DEFENSE, PROPERTIES AND INSTALLATIONS Family housing requirements, assets, and deficit for personnel in the armed

services

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Requirements for personnel not presently entitled to quarters
Estimated deficits
Basic deficit.

56,000 218, 240

56,000 153, 617

0 64, 623

274, 240

209, 617

64, 623

Includes military personnel who receive quarters allowances under permanent legislation (officers and enlisted men in grades E-7, E-6, E-5, and E-4 with 7 or more years of service) and key civilians. Gross requirements are detailed in supplement A, attached.

2 Includes all adequate housing (existing and under contract) under military ownership, under military sponsorship but privately owned (Wherry and rental guaranty), and privately or publicly owned in communities within reasonable commuting distance (usually 15 miles or 30 minutes). Detailed in supplement B, attached.

3 Includes all c irrently programed (not under contract) military-owned and military-sponsored housing, but excludes privately owned offbase housing scheduled for future development. Detailed in supplement C, attached.

* Includes enlisted men in grades E-1, E-2, E-3, and E-4, with less than 7 years of service who receive quarters allowances under temporary legislation. Detailed in supplement A, attached.

> For initial programing purposes for this category of personnel, estimate is based on 25 percent of gross requirements in continental United States only. This red action allows for adequate private housing, as well as substantial safety factors to offset ineffective demand and lack of precise information,

SUPPLEMENT A.-Gross family housing requirements' for personnel in the armed

services

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Based on planned military and key civilian strength, exclusive of ancillary personnel (cadets, midship-
nen, students, trainers, hospital patients, transients, industrial detachments, diplomatic attachés, ROTC
..tructors, personnel on special missions, etc.) and fleet personnel of the Navy and Marine Corps.

. Includes officers, enlisted men in grades E-7, E-6, E-5, and E-4 with 7 or more years of service, and key

civilians.

* Includes enlisted men in grades E-1, E-2, E-3, and E-4 with less than 7 years of sorrice, in continental

ited States. This category does not include overseas requirements because of lack of authorization for

3-nendent travel allowances. Excludes nonessential civilians who ordinarily reside in communities sur.

unding military installations.

Based on “interim Army" of 1,027,000.

• Based on strength of $57,000 planned for June 30, 1957, and thereafter, exclusive of fleet personnel (338,000).
* Based on strength of 975,000 planned for end of fiscal year 1959 (June 30, 1959).

SUPPLEMENT B.--Adequate existing family housing for personnel in the armed

services

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Army
Navy
Air Force.

0

0 1,500

0 0 0

1, 500

Offbase private housing 5

155, 845

143, 332

12, 513

Army.
Navy
Air Force.

51, 764
31, 581
72, 500

48, 976
29, 356
65,000

2, 788
2, 225
7, 500

1 Includes units which are completed, under construction, and under contract.

Excludes 2,984 units built for nonessential civilians by Navy in the continental United States. 3 Includes projects in France (2,152 units for Army and 2,695 units for Air Force) and in French Morocco (700 units for Air Force) which are complete, under construction, or under contract.

* Includes projects in the United Kingdom which are under contract.

6 As actually reported by installations, except for Navy which estimated that 25 percent of gross requirements find adequate offbase housing.

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SUPPLEMENT C.-Programed family housing for personnel in the armed services

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1 Includes units authorized in fiscal year 1956 and prior years which are planned for development but are Dot yet under contract.

: Includes units in projects approved for development on Jan. 10, 1956. Total units planned by services are: Army, 35,000; Navy, 13,000; and Air Force, 52,000. * Includes 620 units in French Morocco, 500 in Newfoundland, and 1,518 in Spain. * Includes 3,064 units in France, 700 in French Morocco, 1,700 in Japan, and 350 in Italy.

Mr. FLOETE. As to military personnel who, by permanent legislation, are entitled to receive quarters allowances, these tables may be summarized as follows:

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Including enlisted men who are entitled to quarters allowances under temporary legislation, the deficit is increased by 56,000 units to a total of 274.240.

The full subject is shown in graphic form in chart C. (The chart referred to follows:)

71066-56-No. 61

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