Lapas attēli
PDF
ePub

groups are studying the pros and cons of United States adherence to Berne with

[blocks in formation]

authors' rights. For example, the Authors' League of America has formed a small

group to study problems of implement ing legislation. All of this is tentative and exploratory the possible beginnings of difficult and

a

time-consuming process.

This hearing is of course not the place to explore the many issues which

adherence to Berne must necessarily raise.

But the Copyright office urges the

Subcommittee

to engage itself fully in the matter of Berne adherence and,

ideally, to coordinate with its Senate counterpart a program for thorough

analysis of the impact of adherence upon our present copyright law as well as

certain important areas for possible future development.

Thank you for the opportunity to report on the condition of the Copyright

Office and on some of the major copyright policy issues.

My colleagues and I

would be pleased to respond to your questions, either now or at a later time

for the record.

[merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][merged small][ocr errors][merged small]

Mr. KASTENMEIER. Thank you, Mr. Curran. I would also hope to have your second appended statement, which you have just delivered, in writing.

Mr. CURRAN. I will supply it for the record, sir.
[The summary statement of Mr. Curran follows:

STATEMENT OF DONALD C. CURRAN
THE ASSOCIATE LIBRARIAN OF CONGRESS AND
ACTING REGISTER OF COPYRIGHTS

COPYRIGHT OFFICE

Before the Subcommittee on Courts, Civil Liberties,

and the Administration of Justice
House Committee on the Judiciary
99th Congress, First Session

May 1, 1985

The Place and Role of the Copyright Office

of the Library of Congress

The Library of Congress through law and historical development has

become in its 185-year history the custodian of the largest collection of

intellectual property gathered in any one place.

It is no accident that the

Congress in 1870 gave the Library of Congress responsibility for administering

the U.S. copyright law.

It is the one place in the U. S. Government where the

creator of intellectual property and the user of the property come together,

promoting "the progress of science and useful arts."

I would like to share with you our thoughts on the place and role of

the Copyright Office.

The Copyright Office became

a separate department of

the Library by statute in 1897.

We have a somewhat biased view but we believe that the Nation has

been well served by the Library and its Copyright Office, and that it will The benefits flowing to

continue to be so in the future.

the national library and

the world of

learning as a result of the deposit system are both tangible and intangible.

It brings to the nation in one place a vast body of intellectual property,

published and unpublished, created by our citizens in all formats, shapes and sizes. Much of what is obtained through deposit is not readily available, nor

indeed available at all through conventional purchase order arrangements.

Of

[blocks in formation]

purchase, gift, and exchange, but copyright deposit continues to be a key

[blocks in formation]

relationship of a major U. S. cultural institution with the copyright process. We believe the Library has an intellectually stimulating working environment which is both attractive and supportive of the Copyright Office. We are able to attract and keep people who understand the importance of protecting intellectual property. In like manner, Library management is sensitive to the

significance and importance of an activity whose function

is

to examine,

catalog, record, and process intellectual property pursuant to the copyright

law of the United States.

These are not qualities always found in a large

government bureaucracy.

The Library of Congress and its Copyright Office are

compat ible and mutually supportive.

The responsibilities of the Copyright office are plainly set forth in Title 17. The Register directs all administrative functions and duties under

Title 17 not otherwise specified.

Section 702 authorizes the Register to

« iepriekšējāTurpināt »