NASA Authorization for Fiscal Year 1963: Hearings Before the Committee on Aeronautical and Space Sciences, United States Senate, Eighty-seventh Congress, Second Session, on H.R. 11737, an Act to Authorize Appropriations to the National Aeronautics and Space Administration for Research, Development, and Operation; Construction of Facilities; and for Other Purposes. June 13, 14, and 15, 1962

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Saturs

Detailed cloud analysis September 11 1961
57
International satellite programs
58
International sounding rocket programs
60
Tracking and data acquisition stations abroad
62
NASA program
64
Space science
66
Scientific satellites and sounding rockets
68
Unmanned lunar exploration
70
Planetary exploration
72
Light and medium launch vehicles
74
Space science fiscal year 1963 budget estimate
77
Applications
78
Meteorological satellites
80
Communications satellites
82
Applications fiscal year 1963 budget estimate
88
Manned space flight
90
MERCURY 3 orbits
91
Oneday manned flight 25 GEMINI
93
APPOLLO 27 Large launch vehicle and liquid propulsion development
98
Manned Spacecraft Center Houston Tex 29 Michoud plant New Orleans La
100
Mississippi test facility
102
APOLLO launch complex
105
Manned space flight fiscal year 1963 budget estimate
107
Advanced research and technology
110
Aircraft and missile technology
112
Spacecraft technology
114
Launch vehicle technology
115
Nuclear systems technology
116
Chemical propulsion technology
118
Advanced research and technology fiscal year 1963 budget estimate 40 Tracking facilities
121
Tracking and data acquisition fiscal year 1963 budget estimate
124
NASA Headquarters Organization 130 43 NASA Headquarters Organization 44 NASA Operating Organization
133
NASA Ames Research Center
135
NASA Flight Research Center
138
Station
139
NASA Flight Research Center Beatty Nev High Range Tracking 48 NASA Langley Research CenterEast area
141
NASA Langley Research CenterWest area
142
NASA Lewis Research Center
145
NASAAEC Nuclear Rocket Development Station
148
NASA Plum Brook Research Station
150
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
152
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory
155
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Edwards Test Station
156
NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory Echo Station Goldstone
157
NASA Manned Spacecraft Center Houston Tex
159
NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterDevelopment laboratories
161
NASA Marshall Space Flight CenterDevelopment test area
162
NASA Michoud plant
164
NASA Mississippi Test Facility
166
NASA Atlantic Missile Range
168
NASA SATURN Launch Complex No 34 Atlantic Missile Range
169
NASA MERCURY Launch Pad No 14 Atlantic Missile Range
170
NASA industrial facilities Atlantic Missile Range
171
NASA launch complexes Pacific Missile Range
173
NASA Wallops Station Launch Area
175
NASA Wallops Station Operations Area
176
NASA installations and staffing
179
NASA staffing
180
NASA program and staffing growth
181
588
182
Major actions since May 1961 related to the National Aeronautics and Space program
183
Atlantic Missile Range
188
iii
189
tional Aeronautics and Space Administration
190
Space science
192
Space science objectives
194
Terminology
196
Fields
199
Earth and sun
201
Moon and planets
203
Stars and galaxies
205
Life in space
206
Sounding rockets satellites space probes
208
83
209
Light and medium launch vehicles
210
Space science program progress by calendar years
212
Radi ation belt studies
214
Gamma ray astronomy
218
Space scienceTotal schedule
220
88
221
Geophysical and solar studies
222
Geophysics and solar physics
224
90
225
Sodium vapor release for winds shears turbulence and tempera ture
226
91
227
EXPLORER XII
228
92
229
Polar orbiting geophysical satellite topside sounder 230
230
93
231
Eccentric orbiting geophysical observatories 234
234
Astronomy
236
Astronomy
238
97
239
EXPLORER XIGamma ray satellite
240
98
241
Orbiting Astronomical Observatory
242
Lunar and planetary program objectives
244
Lunar and planetary program1961 launches
245
101
247
Lunar program target milestones
248
Lunar programStatus
250
103
251
RANGER spacecraft
252
104
253
SURVEYOR program
254
Lunar program spacecraftPROSPECTOR concept
257
106
258
107
260
Planetary program opportunities
263
Planetary program status
265
110
266
Planetary programSpacecraft
269
112
270
Planetary programSpacecraft
271
Flight paths in planet vicinity
273
114
274
115
276
116
278
Interplanetary program
279
Biosciences
280
118
282
Search for extraterrestrial life
284
120
286
Detection of extraterrestrial life
287
Detection of extraterrestrial life
289
122
290
Planetary environmental simulation
291
BIOS biological investigation of space
292
124
295
SCOUT performance
299
SCOUT missions
301
DELTA launching
302
DELTA
305
DELTA missions
307
ATLASAGENA B launches RANGER 1
308
NASA AGENA
310
AGENA B missions
313
CENTAUR
314
CENTAUR inflight separation
317
CENTAUR AMR Launch Complex 36
318
CENTAUR stage at AMR launch
320
CENTAUR on launch pad for first flight
322
CENTAUR engine in Lewis Altitude Facility
324
Test firing of CENTAUR engines
326
Network coverage unmanned missions
329
Tracking and data acquisition requirements
330
NASA
360
Manned lunar landingproject APOLLO
371
APOLLO launch complex
372
Vehicles on launch pads
373
Unmanned launch
374
Checkout of escape stage
375
Crew boarding
376
Manned launch
377
Rendezvous
378
Docking
379
Injection into lunar trajectory
381
En route 153 Radiation considerations
384
Midcourse correction
385
Crew activities
386
Into a lunar orbit
387
Lunar landing
389
Lunar exploration
390
Lunar takeoff
391
Return to earthMidcourse correction
393
Reentry corridor 162 Reentry 163 Descent in atmosphere
396
Landing
397
Recovery
398
The program
399
Manned space flight
401
Project MERCURY flight test results
403
Project MERCURY
405
Project MERCURY
407
Figure Page 171 Project MERCURY
409
Project MERCURY
410
172a Project MERCURY
412
MERCURY tracking network
414
Bermuda
415
Grand Canary
416
Kano Nigeria
417
Woomera Australia
418
Canton Island
419
Mercury Control Center
421
Manned Oneday mission
423
Manned oneday mission
424
Project GEMINI
426
Comparison of manned spacecraft
427
Project GEMINILaunch vehicles
430
Lunar orbit rendezvous technique
447
Lunar orbit rendezvous
448
Mission selection
450
Engines for manned flight
452
Spacecraft propulsion
455
1st SATURN launch
457
Project APOLLOLaunch vehicle requirements
458
Mission components
460
Manned Space Flight Organization
462
Man and Aerospace Medicine Organization
465
Launch Vehicles and Rocket Engines Organization
467
Flight Mission and Spacecraft Organization
469
Location of major participants
471
Manned space flight major activities
472
Marshall Space Flight Center Huntsville Ala
474
Cape Canaveral
477
ADVANCED SATURN launch complexCape Canaveral
479
NOVA launch complexCape Canaveral
481
600
483
Direct approach
492
NASA advanced research and technology
506
Functions of NASA program offices for research and technology
507
Advanced research and technology areas of activity
509
Advanced research and technologyFiscal year 1963 budget estimate
510
Aeronautical researchCivil and military
512
Typical VTOL performance
514
Long range and short range VTOL application
515
VSTOL aircraft problem areas
516
Speed bumps
518
Supersonic transport research requirements
520
Multicapability aircraft
522
Multicapability aircraft research requirements
524
X15 research airplane
526
Hypersonic cruise aircraft
528
Hypersonic cruise propulsion requirements
529
X15 on B52
530
Space vehicle research and technology
541
Program areas
543
Launch vehicle technology
545
Liquid rocket technology
546
Spacecraft launch configurations
548
Launch vehicle buffeting
550
Spacecraft technology
552
Meteoroid flight experiments
553
Radiation damage to electronic materials
555
Countdown for earth and lunar launches
557
Spacecraft electric power systems
559
Solar thermionic power system
560
Reentry vehicle technology
561
Reentry heating
563
Reentry flight experiment 243 Human factors research
567
Space Flight Guidance Research Facility
568
Manned reentry control
580
Nuclear systems technology
583
Mars landing missionNuclear rocket
585
Nuclear rocket engine
586
NASAAEC nuclear rocket program
588
KIWI B1A
589
NERVA engine preliminary design
592
Reactor inflight testRIFT
594
Nuclear stage on ADVANCED SATURNEarth escape payload
596
Nuclear engine test standNRDS
598
Electric propulsion objectives
600
Nuclearelectric power and propulsion system
602
Page 257
603
SNAP 8 electrical generating system
604
Sixtykilowatt electric propulsion and power missionsCENTAUR booster
605
259
607
Electric thrust chamber program
608
Flight test ion engine
610
261
611
Proposed space propulsion research facilityNASA Lewis Research Center
612
Mockup of NERVA engine
616
Office of Applications
623
Meteorological systems program objectives
627
265
628
TIROS launchings
631
267
632
TIROS
634
269
636
Hurricane Betsy Western Atlantic Ocean September 7 1961
638
271
639
Detailed cloud analysis September 11 1961
641
273
642
TIROS data flow
645
275
646
277
650
NIMBUS meteorological satellite 278 NIMBUS
651
279
653
NIMBUS control system developmental model
654
NIMBUS spacecraft versatility
656
281
657
NIMBUS data flow
658
NIMBUS data acquisition station
660
283
661
Meteorological satellite systems NASA and Weather Bureau respon sibilities
662
AEROS meteorological satellite
664
285
665
Lifetimes of typical weather systems
666
287
667
Typical rocket grenade wind measurements at Fort Churchill Can
669
Meteorological systems international activities
671
289
672
Meteorological launch schedule
673
Communications systems program objectives
675
291
676
Types of communications satellite systems
677
Active communications satellites lowaltitude orbits
679
293
680
Communications satellitesRandomly spaced
681
Active communications satellitesSynchronous orbit
683
Multilaunch concept
684
296
686
Forms of passive communication satellites
687
Figure Page 297 ECHO IECHO II
689
ECHO II
691
299
692
Testing for ECHO II
693
Active repeater satellite
695
301
696
RELAY Spacecraft
697
RELAY Spacecraft Antenna Pattern
698
303
699
TELSTAR Spacecraft
700
NASA and A T T responsibilities for TELSTAR
701
305
702
The A T T Andover Facility
703
The A T T Andover Facility
704
307
705
Relay ground stations
706
309
707
SYNCOM Objectives
708
SYNCOM spacecraft
709
SYNCOM sequence launch and attitude control
710
311
711
SYNCOM sequence position control
712
SYNCOM sequence Final positionAntenna pattern
713
313
714
NASA and DOD responsibilities for SYNCOM
715
Advanced research and developmentCommunications systems
717
315
718
Active communications satellites systems improvement
719
Active communications satellites systems improvement
720
317
721
Communications satellites launch schedule
722
Industrial applications
724
627
725
319
726
TIROS III hurricane data
727
662
729
664
730
673
731
677
733
Tracking and data acquisition
759
321
760
Summary of demands on T D A systems
761
MERCURY tracking data acquisition net
763
323
764
Earth satellite instrumentation
765
Minitrack
766
325
767
Alaska Data Acquisition Facility
768
Reception capability of antenna systems
769
327
770
NASASAO optical tracking net
771
Deep space net
773
329
774
Launch area instrumentation
775
Communications net
777
331
778
Minitrack limitations
779
Range and rangerate system
780
Deep space data requirements
782
Deep space antenna system capabilities
783
Manned flight net multiple orbits
785
Data requirements from large satellites in 1964
787
Major NASA data antenna requirements
789
Appendix ASpace program of the U S Weather Bureau
797
Appendix BAdditional material supplied by the Department of Defense
806
372
811
374
817
Appendix ENASA announcement of maximum of six orbits planned
824
385
828
387
829
687
831
393
837
407
845
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