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Chapter

Page

X. STATUTORY REQUISITES FOR COPYRIGHT IN

UNPUBLISHED WORKS

Common-law rights

93

Statutory rights

94

“Not reproduced for sale”

94

Duration of copyright

95

Abandonment of common-law rights

97

Deposit of copies after reproduction for sale

98

Notice of copyright on copies reproduced for sale

99

XI. RENEWAL OF COPYRIGHT

In general

101

Renewal of copyrights acquired under present law

102

Renewable works

103

Registration of renewals

105

Copyrights acquired under prior law

106

Summary of principles in relation to renewals

107

XII. RIGHTS SECURED BY COPYRIGHT AND INFRINGEMENT

THEREOF

Part 1-Exclusive Statutory Rights

111

To vend

111

112

To translate literary work

118

To dramatize non-dramatic work..

119

To convert drama into non-dramatic work

119

To arrange or adapt musical work

120

To complete, etc., model or design for work of art

120

To deliver lecture, etc., in public for profit

125

To perform drama publicly

127

To vend manuscript or record of dramatic work

128

To perform musical composition publicly for profit 130

To make any form of record for reproduction of musical

composition

136

Part 2–Subsidiary Rights Embraced in Copyright

139

Moral rights

139

Interpretative rendition

140

XIII. REMEDIES FOR INFRINGEMENT

Injunctions

142

“Any party aggrieved"

143

Service of process

144

Award of damages and profits

145

"In lieu" clause

146

Mechanical rights

148

Joinder of causes

148

Joinder of parties

149

Bill of complaint

149

Nature of liability

152

Jurisdiction of courts

152

VII

Chapter

Page

XIII. REMEDIES FOR INFRINGEMENT—Continued

Appeals

153

Limitations of actions

153

Attorney's fee and costs

154

XIV. MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS OF COPYRIGHT ACT

False notice of copyright

155

Prohibition of importation

155

Unlawful importation

156

Copyright distinct from material object

156

Assignments, mortgages and bequests

157

Trustee in bankruptcy

158

Recordation of assignments and mortgages

158

Duties of the Register of Copyrights

160

Rules and regulations of the Copyright Office

160

Certificate of registration

161

Copyright fees

161

XV. INTERNATIONAL COPYRIGHT RELATIONS

Berne Convention

163

United Kingdom of Great Britain

163

Canada ..

164

Latin-Ainerican countries.

168

XVI. COPYRIGHT IN TERRITORIAL POSSESSIONS OF UNITED

STATES

Canal Zone

171

Hawaii

171

Philippine Islands

171

Puerto Rico

172

Virgin Islands

173

APPENDIX

Copyright Act of 1909, as amended

177

Committee report (No. 2222) on bill enacting Copyright

Act of 1909

194

Regulations of the Copyright Office

214

Rules of Supreme Court governing practice and procedure

under Section 25 of Copyright Act of 1909 ..

227

Typical Presidential Proclamation of copyright relations

with other countries—Argentina

230

British Order in Council extending copyright protection to

unpublished works of citizens of United States

232

Copyright Convention between United States and other

American Republics ..

234

Berne Copyright Convention, as revised at Rome, 1928 238

Customs regulations affecting copyrighted works

248

Selected bibliography on copyright law

250

TABLE OF CASES CITED

253

TOPICAL INDEX

267

The Constitution

We the People of the United States, in order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the Common Defense, promote the General Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution for the United States of America. Article I. Section 8. The Congress shall

(Clause 8) To promote the Progress of Science and useful Arts, by securing for limited Times to Authors and Inventors the exclusive Right to their respective Writings and Discoveries.

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“The Constitution does not establish copyrights, but provides that Congress shall have the power to grant such rights if it thinks fit. Not primarily for the benefit of the author, but primarily for the benefit of the public, such rights are given. Not that any particular class of citizens, however worthy, may benefit, but because the policy is believed to be for the benefit of the great body of people, in that it will stimulate writing and invention to give some bonus to authors and inventors”. -From Report No. 2222, 60th Congress, 2d Sess., February 22, 1909, accompanying the bill embodying the present Copyright Act approved March 4, 1909, effective July 1, 1909.*

*

This document is no longer available through official channels; because of its inherent value it is reproduced in the Appendix to this volume.

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