A History of Classical Greek Literature, 1. sējums

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Harper and Brothers, 1880 - 458 lappuses
 

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327. lappuse - Methought I saw my late espoused saint Brought to me like Alcestis from the grave, Whom Jove's great son to her glad husband gave, Rescued from death by force though pale and faint.
364. lappuse - By heaven, methinks, it were an easy leap, To pluck bright honour from the pale-fac'd moon ; Or dive into the bottom of the deep, Where fathom-line could never touch the ground, And pluck up drowned honour by the locks...
129. lappuse - ... Pope's Essay on Man, or Mandeville's Fable of the Bees. Thus Empedocles is peculiarly interesting as the last thinker in European philosophy who brought out a new system in the form of a poem. His fragments are preserved in Sextus Empiricus, Plutarch,, and Simplicius, and are best collected by Miillach (in Didot's. Fragg. Philosoph.). There are interesting monographs on him in all the histories of Greek philosophy, especially Zeller's, and in Mr. Symonds' first series on the Greek poets. The...
224. lappuse - If a man should undertake to translate Pindar, word for word, it would be thought that one madman had translated another ; as may appear, when he that understands not the original, reads the verbal traduction of him into Latin prose, than which nothing seems more raving. And sure rhyme, without the addition of wit, and the spirit of poetry, (quod nequeo monstrare et sentio tantum,) would but make it ten times more distracted than it is in prose.
224. lappuse - If (says Cowley) a man should undertake to translate Pindar, word for word, it would be thought that one madman had translated another : as may appear, when he, that understands not the original, reads the verbal traduction of him into Latin prose, than which nothing seems more raving.
349. lappuse - Astyanax supplanting that of Polyxena, and both Cassandra and Andromache appearing. There is, however, far less plot than in the Hecuba, .and we miss even the satisfaction of revenge. It is indeed more absolutely devoid of interest than any play of Euripides, for it is simply ' a voice in Ramah, and lamentation — Rachel weeping for her children, and would not be comforted, because they were not.
268. lappuse - Mr. Robert Browning has given us an over-faithful version from his matchless hand, — matchless, I conceive, in conveying the deeper spirit of the Greek poets. But, in this instance, he has outdone his original in ruggedness, owing to his excess of conscience as a translator
153. lappuse - Smyrnseus (called Calaber from the finding there of the MS.), who wrote a continuation of Homer in fourteen books, thus taking up the work of the cyclic poets, who were probably lost before his time.
372. lappuse - Macedonian youth, with whom literature was coming into fashion, the poet met a good deal of that insolent secondhand scepticism, which is so offensive to a deep and serious thinker, and he may have desired to show that he was not, as they doubtless hailed him, an apostle of this random arrogance.
9. lappuse - Whence the gods severally sprang, whether or no they had all existed from eternity, what forms they bore — these are questions of which the Greeks knew nothing until the other day, so to speak. For Homer and Hesiod were the first to compose Theogonies...

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