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neatly. The marks may be explained briefly as follows:

, push down space or quad showing with

, type.

center, bring the opposite line to the place in. dicated by r.

insert space where caret () is made, 8, take out letters or words canceled. In eliminating matter from proof, be sure to use the printer's mark for deletion. Do not follow the example set by a college professor (and cited in “A Publisher's Confession") who cut a paragraph out of a proof-sheet with a pair of scissors, being fully satisfied that by this method the printer would understand that he intended the excised matter should be deleted.

, turn inverted letter underscored. stet, restore word or letter inadvertently canceled (literally, “let it stand"). y, insert apostrophe. Other superior character's are similarly indicated by being placed in an inverted caret, as ,* and for inferior characters the caret is made in its usual position mas, A.

indent line an em.

bring matter to the left. The mark is reversed (7) when it is desired to move matter to the right

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8?, a correction suggested to the author, to be followed by an interrogation-point. l, lower word or letter. To raise a word or letter, the sign is used. O, insert period.

The change of a word or of a letter is indicated by a line drawn through the faulty matter, the word or letter to be substituted being written opposite in the margin.

Omitted words or letters are indicated in the same manner, a caret being placed where the insertion is to be made.

II, justify the lines-that is, space so that the margin will appear even and straight.

X , broken letter. A logotype character is indicated by a tie-as, ff caps, change matter underlined to capitals. tr., transpose words or letter underlined.

draw together matter indicated by a similar mark in type, No T, run on matter without break.

, a combination of & and , signifying 6. Take out canceled character and close up." 1. C., change matter underlined to lower-case.

, straighten lines. rom., roman type. If too much matter has been omitted by the

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compositor to be conveniently written in the margin of the proof, “Out; see copyis written, and the place for insertion indicated as shown. Other marks used will prove practically selfexplaining by reference to the corrected proofsheet that follows.

To indicate that matter set is required in a bolder face of type than that in which it is printed, underline the matter and write “boldfaced” or “full-faced” in the margin of the proof.

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TAR LOST ARTS.

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Ladies and Gentlemen:

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estimate, We have a pitying scene kender compassion, for

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lecturephich has grown ander my hand year after yeary »
ufter year, and which belong to that first phase of the

lyceum system, before it undertook to meddle with polit.
trical duties or angry and dangerous questions of ethics;

when it mas merely an academic institution, trying to

wio busy men back to books, teaching a little science, stet

repeating some tale of foreigu travel, of painting

some great representative chezacter, the symbol of / teen baat his age. I think I can claim a purpose beyond objectionable % 왔 moments amusement lộ this glance at carty civilization.

flataire cine for what is the mosyor our nationgi character; and

that is self conceit, - an undue appreciation of our
selves

, an exaggerated estimate of our ackskrements, of telo
our inventions, of our contributions to popular comfort,
and of. our place, in fact, in the great profession of the
ages, We seem to imagine that, whether knowledge will
die with us, or not, it certainly began with us

holl
the narrowuess, ignorance, and Darkness of the bygone l...
(ages. We seem to monopolize not only to ourselves, but te/

to have begun, the era of light. In other words, we
over/ are all running, with a fourthday/o£July spirit of selfo -/-/-/

I am often reminded' of the german whom the call
English poet Coleridge met at Frankfortyn It seems to
me, the American people might be painted in the chronic
attitude of taking of its hat to itself

and therefore it can
be no waste of time, with an audience in such a mood.
to take their
eyes for a moment

from the present civili
31 gation, and guide them back to that earliest possible eri
that history describes fous, if it were only for the

lead gleads purpose of asking

whether we boast on the right line. I might despair of curiós the habit of boasting, but I " might direct it better

Wendell Phillips.

7 s. caps ef * This lectug was afoer revised by Mr. Phillips, and is perfect la im

form ande Pression Bur is the best report io esistfoce.

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THE LOST ARTS.'
Ladies and Gentlemen :

I am to talk to you to-night about "The Lost Arts"-
a lecture which has grown under my hand year after
year, and which belongs to that first phase of the lyceum
system, before it undertook to meddle with political du-
ties or dangerous and angry questions of ethics; when it
was merely an academic institution, trying to wip busy
men back to books, teaching a little science, or repeat-
ing some tale of foreign travel, or painting some great
representative character, the symbol of his age. I think
I can claim a purpose beyond a moment's amusement in
this glance at early civilization.

I, perhaps, might venture to claim that it was a medi. cine for what is the most objectionable feature of our national character; and that is self-conceit, -an undue appreciation of ourselves, an exaggerated estimate of our achievements, of our inventions, of our contributions to popular comfort, and of our place, in fact, in the great procession of the ages. · We seem to imagine that, whether knowledge will die with us, or not, it certainly began with us. We have a pityingi estimate, a tender compassion, for the narrowness, ignorance, and darkness of the bygone ages. We seem to ourselves not only to monopolize, but to have begun, the era of light. In other words, we are all running over with a fourth-day.of.July spirit of self-content. I am often reminded of the German wbom the English poet Coleridge met at Frankfort. He always took off his hat with profound respect when he ventured to speak of himself. It seems to me, the American people might be painted in the chronic attitude of taking off its hat to itself; and therefore it can be 00 waste of time, with an audience in such a mood, to take their eyes for a moment from the present civilization, and guide them back to that earliest possible era that history describes for us, if it were only for the purpose of asking whether we boast on the right line. I might despair of curing the babit of boasting, but I might direct it better!

WENDELL PEILLIPS. This lecture was never revised by Mr. Phillips, and is imperfect in form and expression. But it is the best report la cxistcoce.

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