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OF THE

THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association

HELD AT

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

AUGUST 25, 26, 27 AND 28, 1908

ji:

BALTIMORE:
THE LORD BALTIMORE PRESS

THE

THIRTY-SECOND ANNUAL MEETING

WILL BE HELD AT

DETROIT, MICHIGAN

ON TUESDAY, WEDNESDAY, THURSDAY AND FRIDAY

AUGUST 24, 25, 26 AND 27,

1909

95522

TRANSACTIONS

OF THE

THIRTY-FIRST ANNUAL MEETING

OF THE

American Bar Association

HELD AT

SEATTLE, WASHINGTON

August 25, 26, 27, 28, 1908.

Tuesday, August 25, 1908, 10.30 A. M. The Thirty-first Annual Meeting of the American Bar Association, convened in the New Washington Hotel, Seattle, Washington, on Tuesday, August 25, 1908, at 10.30 A. M.

The meeting was called to order by Walter George Smith, of Pennsylvania, who presented the President of the Association, Jacob M. Dickinson, of Illinois.

The President: Ladies and gentlemen: It gives me pleasure to introduce the Honorable ('ornelius H. Hanford, United States District Judge for the Western District of Washington, who will speak a word of welcome on behalf of the Bar of the State of Washington.

Cornelius H. Hanford, of Washington:

Mr. President, ladies and gentlemen : I am here on behalf of the lawyers of Washington to welcome you, and I wish to express to you in unmeasured terms the gratification of our citizens at having you meet with us. Others will again welcome you to the city and to the Coast, but we as lawyers in our humble way give you hearty welcome as co-workers. Many persons have the misguided idea that all lawyers do is to stir up trouble. But we know differently. The American Bar Association stands for good citizenship, the highest type of manhood, therefore, we are very glad indeed to have you in our city.

The President:

I also take pleasure in introducing to you Honorable John F. Miller, Mayor of the City of Seattle.

John F. Miller, Mayor of Seattle, Washington:

Mr. President, ladies and members of the American Bar Association: For the first time in the history of your Association you are meeting on the Pacific Coast and it is, therefore, a distinct honor to this city that you have chosen to gather here now. It augurs well for the great West—the great West that is rapidly coming into possession of her own. The great ocean whose tides wash, our shores will soon have its share of the commerce of the old world and the new. For generations the Pacific Coast has had but one great commercial centre, brave, heroic San Francisco. For fifty years she was supreme. But the pendulum of time is on its swing and now that city has challengers on both the north and the south. Some day, somewhere on this Coast, will be one of the greatest commercial cities of the world.

We who have long lived in the West, and on the Coast, know its romance, and we know its tragedy. The building of the great railway lines to this Western sea meant the going of the red man and the coming of the white. The vast and valuable public domain became at once the prize of many millions of the nation's best men. The laws framed by the Congress, in the main wise and wholesome, were liberal to the end that along with the homeLuilder came the rascal, the rogue and the corruptionist, who took by fraud that which the nation intended he should take only by giving value received—that is, the bona fide residence of the entryman. For a time these rogues and rascals, through corruption of officials, fattened and thrived, but the hounds of justice of late years have been deeply baying on their tracks, and today, as some of them sit in their polished halls, they find their only comfort, their only solace, their only refuge in that clause of mooted wisdom in the law, the statute of limitations.

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