Works: Collected and Edited by James Spedding, Robert Leslie Ellis, and Douglas Denon Heath, 3. sējums

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343. lappuse - The use of this feigned history hath been to give some shadow of satisfaction to the mind of man in those points wherein the nature of things doth deny it, the world being in proportion inferior to the soul...
343. lappuse - And therefore it was ever thought to have some participation of divineness, because it doth raise and erect the mind, by submitting the shows of things to the desires of the mind; whereas reason doth buckle and bow the mind unto the nature of things.
295. lappuse - Faithful are the wounds of a friend ; but the kisses of an enemy are deceitful.
285. lappuse - ... their wits being shut up in the cells of a few authors, chiefly Aristotle their dictator, as their persons were shut up in the cells of monasteries and colleges, and knowing little history, either of nature or time, did, out of no great quantity of matter, and infinite agitation of wit, spin out unto us those laborious webs of learning, which are extant in their books.
286. lappuse - For the wit and mind of man, if it work upon matter, which is the contemplation of the creatures of God, worketh according to the stuff, and is limited thereby ; but if it work upon itself, as the spider worketh his web, then it is endless, and brings forth indeed cobwebs of learning, admirable for the fineness of thread and work, but of no substance or profit.
481. lappuse - Then said some of his disciples among themselves, What is this that he saith unto us, A little while, and ye shall not see me : and again a little while and ye shall see me ; and, Because I go to the Father ? They said therefore, What is this that he saith, A little while ? we cannot tell what he saith.
165. lappuse - Then after divers meetings and consults of our whole number, to consider of the former labours and collections, we have three that take care, out of them, to direct new experiments, of a higher light, more penetrating into nature than the former.
298. lappuse - Surely there is a vein for the silver, And a place for gold where they fine it. Iron is taken out of the earth, And brass is molten out of the stone.
147. lappuse - But thus you see we maintain a trade, not for gold, silver, or jewels, nor for silks, nor for spices, nor any other commodity of matter, but only for God's first creature, which was light; to have light, I say, of the growth of all parts of the world.
268. lappuse - To conclude therefore: Let no man, upon a weak conceit of sobriety or an ill-applied moderation, think or maintain that a man can search too far or be too well studied in the book of God's Word, or in the book of God's Works — Divinity or Philosophy; — but rather let men endeavor an endless progress or proficience in both.

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