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LIBRARY OF THE UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE:

All cards printed by Library of Congress from copy prepared by

the Library of the Department of Agriculture, covering (1) accessions to the Library of the Department of Agriculture since 1902, excluding such books as are also in the Library of Congress; (2) analytical cards for most of the publications of the Depart

ment of Agriculture. LIBRARY OF THE UNITED STATES GEOLOGICAL SURVEY:

All cards printed by Library of Congress from copy prepared by

the Library of the Survey, representing (1) accessions to the Library of the Survey since 1904, excluding books also in Library of Congress; (2) publications of the present and previous United States surveys, the state surveys, the national surveys of Canada, Norway, and Sweden, and most of the publications of the state

surveys of Australia. LIBRARY OF THE MILITARY INFORMATION DIVISION (U. S. War DEPARTMENT): Cards printed by Library of Congress from copy prepared by the

Library of the Military Information Division for accessions

since 1907, excluding books also in Library of Congress. WASHINGTON PUBLIC LIBRARY:

Cards for accessions since 1906, excluding books also in Library of

Congress.

To prepare the cards for this Union Catalogue, it was necessary to mount the 32° size Harvard cards on 33° size cards, trim the Boston Public cards to 33° size (first copying back and above letters which would be unavoidably clipped off), mount entries clipped from the Harvard Bulletin, and stamp all cards with the name of the library from which the entry was received. The mounting of the cards and slips was done so satisfactorily by the Library bindery that curling was almost entirely avoided.

All the entries received from the libraries named above are being filed for the present regardless of duplication, as variations in form of entry are of interest to the Catalogue Division. The percentage of duplication is found to be surprisingly small. Less than 7 per cent of the titles are in two of the libraries, while only a fraction of i per cent are in three or more libraries. This small percentage of duplication is probably accounted for by the following: (1) These nine libraries are to a large extent specializing along different lines; (2) the accumulation represents the accessions of these libraries for periods which correspond in part only; (3) some of them during the period covered have been building up collections, while others have been merely keeping up and strengthening their collections. About 20 per cent of the titles in the Union Catalogue are duplicated by printed cards in the catalogues of the Library of Congress.

The catalogue when completed will contain about 600,000 entries. Taken with the present accumulation of between 600,000 and 700,000 entries in the public catalogues of the Library of Congress, it will constitute the closest approximation now available to a complete record of books in American libraries.

The report of the Card Section is, as usual, given in full because the work which it describes is one of direct economic concern to other institutions, whose efficiency as a whole depends upon the efficiency of its details. It is also a work whose character can readily be explained and whose volume can be expressed in statistics.

In this it differs from that large service of the Library which is intensive rather than extensive. The possibility of setting forth this latter within the compass of such a report as this seems to diminish as it increases in volume, in variety, and in importance.

The knowledge of it is, however, spreading rapidly among our own students and investigators, who evidence it by their increasing use of the facilities offered, and notably abroad in those countries given to the study of library administration, and active in the establishment or improvement of libraries. The building is, as a matter of course, visited and inspected by commissions charged with the construction of reference

In a

library buildings abroad, upon important recent examples of which its plans and equipment have had obvious influence. And no comprehensive treatise upon the larger aspects of the service of a research library with a duty to the general public now omits a reference to the operations of this one. recent such treatise by M. Eugène Morel, “Bibliothèques,” Paris, 1909, it is characterized as a “Department” (Ministère) with four main functions:

"Nous signalons seulement ces points sur lesquels nous aurons tant à revenir. Ils suffisent à nous faire concevoir leur Bibliothèque nationale non comme un musée, ou une bibliothèque de quartier, ou une bibliothèque spéciale historique, conceptions diverses que les journalistes et historiens se font de la nôtre, mais comme un ministère, où sous une direction unique sont groupés tous les services concernant la propriété artistique et littéraire, les bibliothèques, les livres, l'établissement

enfin et la diffusion d'une bibliographie générale." Respectfully submitted

HERBERT PUTNAM

Librarian of Congress The Honorable

THE PRESIDENT OF THE SENATE The Honorable

THE SPEAKER OF THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES

REPORT OF THE SUPERINTENDENT OF THE LIBRARY BUILDING

AND GROUNDS

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