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INTRODUCTORY.

The complete report of the Immigration Commission consists of 42 volumes. In volume 1 there is presented a brief history of the organization and work of the Commission, together with its conclusions and recommendations, but this volume, as well as volume 2, consists for the most part of abstracts of the more extended reports of the Commission upon various phases of the subject under consideration. In preparing these abstracts it was the purpose of the Commission to present in a condensed form some of the more essential results of its investigations, and while the various abstracts lack the great mass of important statistical and other data contained in the reports upon which they are based, it is believed that they are sufficiently exhaustive to meet the requirements of the average student of the immigration problem.

Included in the two volumes are the complete reports of the Commission on various subjects, and also the present United States immigration laws and regulations, the treaty, laws, and regulations governing the admission of Chinese, and the United States naturalization laws and regulations.

The reports and abstracts of reports included in the two volumes are as follows:

Statistical review of immigration to the United States, 1820-1910.This abstract is based on a statistical work of the same title which contains a compilation of all available statistics relative to immigration to the United States from 1819, when such data were first recorded, to June 30, 1910.

Distribution of immigrants, 1850-1900.-An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Dr. Joseph A. Hill, chief statistician of the Division of Revision and Results, Bureau of the Census, assisted by W. F. Hickernell, special agent. The report is based on United States Census reports.

Emigration conditions in Europe. Based on the report which resulted from the Commission's investigations in the principal immigrant-furnishing countries of Europe.

Immigrant races or peoples.-An abstract of the dictionary of races or peoples which was prepared for the Commission by Dr. Daniel Folkmar, assisted by Dr. Elnora C. Folkmar.

Immigrants in manufacturing and mining.-An abstract of the reports on immigrants in industries, as follows: Bituminous-coal mining, iron and steel manufacturing, cotton-goods manufacturing in the North Atlantic States, woolen and worsted goods manufacturing, silk-goods manufacturing and dyeing, clothing manufacturing, collar, cuff, and shirt manufacturing, leather manufacturing, boot and shoe manufacturing, glove manufacturing, slaughtering and meat packing, sugar refining, glass manufacturing, agricultural implement and vehicle manufacturing, cigar and tobacco manufacturing, furniture manufacturing, copper mining and smelt

ing, iron-ore mining, anthracite-coal mining, oil refining, diversified industries, and the floating immigrant labor supply. This abstract and the reports upon which it is based were prepared under the direction of the Commission by W. Jett Lauck, superintendent of agents, who also had charge of the main field work in this branch of the Commission's inquiry.

Recent immigrants in agriculture.-An abstract based on the Commission's general report of the same title, which report concerns the status and progress of recent immigrants of various races who have entered agricultural pursuits in States east of the Rocky Mountains. This branch of the inquiry was conducted under the direction of the Commission by Alexander E. Cance, Ph. D., of Massachusetts Agricultural College, who also prepared the general report and abstract upon the subject.

Japanese and other immigrant races in the Pacific Coast and Rocky Mountain States. An abstract based on the Commission's report of the same title. The abstract and the report upon which it is based were prepared by Prof. H. A. Millis, of Leland Stanford Junior University, who as superintendent of agents had charge of the Commission's general investigations in the Western division of States.

The immigration situation in Hawaii. This is the complete report upon the subject and was prepared for the Commission by Dr. Victor S. Clark.

Immigrants in cities.-An abstract based on the Commission's report of the same title which treats of the social and economic status of recent immigrants in congested districts of New York, Chicago, Philadelphia, Boston, Buffalo, Cleveland, and Milwaukee. The field work in this investigation was conducted under the direction of the Commission by Dr. E. A. Goldenweiser, special agent, and the report was prepared by Doctor Goldenweiser and Mary Louise Mark, special agent, assisted by Nellie F. Sheets.

Occupations of the first and second generations of immigrants in the United States. An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Dr. Joseph A. Hill, chief statistician of the Division of Revision and Results, Bureau of the Census. The report is based on unpublished data from United States Census schedules.

The children of immigrants in schools. An abstract of the Commission's general report on the status of the children of immigrants in the public schools of 37 cities and the parochial schools of 24 cities. The data upon which this report is based were collected and tabulated under the direction of Dr. Roland P. Falkner. Before the completion of the work, however, Doctor Falkner resigned from the service of the Commission to become financial representative of the Republic of Liberia, and the abstract was prepared by Fred_C. Croxton, chief statistician of the Commission, assisted by Frances W. Simonds.

Immigrants as charity seekers.-An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title. This report concerns the activities of federated charity organizations in 43 cities during the winter of 1908-9. The inquiry was conducted with the assistance of Mr. Francis H. McLean, field secretary of the field department for the extension of organized charity in the United States, and the field work was superintended and the report prepared under the direction of the Commission by Jessie C. Lloyd, special agent.

Immigration and crime.-An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title, both of which were prepared under the direction of the Commission by Leslie Hayford, special agent.

Immigration and insanity.-This is the complete report of the Commission upon the subject, and was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Earle Clark, special agent.

Immigrants in charity hospitals.-This is the complete report of the Commission upon the subject, and is based on data collected by the Commission in Bellevue and Allied Hospitals, New York City, during the seven months ending February 28, 1909. The report was prepared by Fred C. Croxton, chief statistician of the Commission, assisted by Inez M. Clark.

Steerage conditions.-An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title (S. Doc. No. 206, 61st Cong., 2d sess.) which was prepared by Anna Herkner, special agent, and presented to Congress December 13, 1909. The report is based on reports of Miss Herkner and other special agents of the Commission who traveled in the steerage of transatlantic ships and on vessels engaged in the coastwise trade.

Immigrant homes and aid societies.-An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Martha E. Dodson, special agent, who also had charge of collecting the data upon which the report is based.

Importation and harboring of women for immoral purposes.-An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title (S. Doc. No. 196, 61st Cong., 2d sess.) which was presented to Congress December 10, 1909.

Alien seamen and stowaways.-This is the complete report of the Commission upon the subject, and is based in part on investigations made for the Commission by Inspector Samuel A. Eppler, of the United States Immigration Service.

Contract labor and induced and assisted immigration. This is the complete report of the Commission upon the subject. It is based in part upon the investigations of Commission agents and in part upon data furnished to the Commission by Inspector John Gruenberg, of the United States Immigration Service.

The Greek padrone system in the United States.-This is the complete report of the Commission upon the subject, and was prepared for the Commission by Inspector A. A. Seraphic, of the United States Immigration Service.

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Immigrant banks.—An abstract of the Commission's report of the same title (S. Doc. 381, 61st Cong., 2d sess.) which was presented to Congress February 24, 1910. This report was prepared by W. K. Ramsey, jr., special agent, under the direction of W. Jett Lauck, superintendent of agents.

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Peonage. This is the complete report of the Commission the subject, and is based on investigations conducted under the direction of a special committee of the Commission.

Fecundity of immigrant women.-An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Dr. Joseph A. Hill, chief statistician of the Division of Revision and Results, Bureau of the Census, assisted by Julius H. Parmelee. The report is based on unpublished data from United States Census schedules.

Changes in bodily form of descendants of immigrants.-An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared for the Commission by Franz Boas, professor of anthropology, Columbia University, New York. A partial report upon the subject (S. Doc. 208, 61st Cong., 2d sess.) was presented to Congress December 16, 1909.

Federal immigration legislation.-An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Frank L. Shaw, special agent.

Steerage legislation, 1819-1908.-An abstract of a report of the same title which was prepared under the direction of the Commission by Glen Edwards, special agent.

The immigration situation in other countries.-An abstract of the Commission's report on the immigration situation in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Argentina, and Brazil. The complete report on Canada (S. Doc. 469, 61st Cong., 2d sess.) was presented to Congress April 1, 1910. The reports on Australia and New Zealand were prepared under the direction of the Commission by Mary Helen Eagan, and the reports on Argentina and Brazil by Mary Mills West. The complete reports of the Commission include the following, of which no abstract was made:

Digest of Immigration Decisions.

State Immigration and Alien Laws.

Statements and Recommendations Submitted by Societies and Organizations Interested in the Subject of Immigration.

The first named consists of a digest of the principal judicial decisions and opinions in cases arising under the statutes and treaties relating to the exclusion and deportation of aliens, which was compiled for the Commission by John W. Clifton, special agent. The digest is confined chiefly to decisions rendered by courts of final jurisdiction. The cardinal principles of law involved in the cases adjudicated are presented, for the most part, through brief extracts taken from the opinions delivered.

The report on State immigration and alien laws, which also was compiled by Mr. Clifton, contains the principal legislative enactments of the various States respecting immigration and aliens, including the earlier laws of some of the seaboard States for the regulation of the movement from foreign countries.

The Commission's plan of work did not include formal hearings, and consequently but little testimony, in the ordinary meaning of that term, was taken. However, various societies and organizations were invited by the Commission to submit statements and recommendations relative to the subject under consideration and the invitation was quite generally responded to. These statements and recommendations are published in a separate volume in the Commission's general report.

BRIEF STATEMENT OF THE INVESTIGATIONS OF THE

IMMIGRATION COMMISSION, WITH CONCLUSIONS

AND RECOMMENDATIONS AND VIEWS
OF THE MINORITY.

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