Halleck's International Law: Or, Rules Regulating the Intercourse of States in Peace and War, 2. sējums

Pirmais vāks
C. K. Paul & Company, 1878

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Saturs

Insurgent inhabitants and levies en masse
9
Hostile acts of private persons on the high seas
10
Use of privateers
11
Privateers not used in recent wars
12
Declaration of the Conference of Paris in 1856
14
Privateers by whom commissioned
15
Treaty stipulations respecting privateers
16
Implements of
17
Use of poisoned weapons
18
Poisoning wells food
20
Surprises
21
Allowable deceptions
22
Stratagems
23
Use of a false flag at
24
Deceitful intelligence
25
Employment of spies
26
Cases of Hale and André
27
Rewarding traitors
28
Intestine divisions of enemys subjects
29
II
49
12
59
CHAPTER XX
68
10
76
When each belligerent supports its own prisoners
87
May prisoners of war be put to death
88
Cseless defence of a place
90
Sacking a captured town
91
Remarks of Napier
92
Fugitives and deserters found among prisoners of war
93
Rule of reciprocity
94
2
95
CHAPTER XXI
96
Public archives
103
Public libraries and works of art
104
Civil structures and monuments
106
Private property on land
108
Penalty for illegal acts
109
Military contributions
113
Property taken on field of battle or in a siege
114
All booty primarily belongs to the State
115
Useless destruction of enemys property
117
Rule of moderation
118
Questions of booty
119
Ancient courts of chivalry
120
English law respecting booty
121
CHAPTER XXII
124
Opinions of Mably and others
125
16
126
17
140
18
142
20
143
21
154
22
166
20
171
22
173
Qualified neutrality
174
Advantages and resulting duties of neutrality
175
Hostilities not allowed within neutral jurisdiction
177
Passage of troops through neutral territory
178
Opinions of European and American publicists
179
Case of the Caroline
180
Right of asylum
182
Presumptive right of entry
183
Arming vessels and enlisting troops
184
Loans of money by neutrals
195
Pursuit of enemy from neutral port
196
Passage over neutral waters
197
Municipal laws in favour of neutrality
198
Laws of United States
199
28
202
Of Great Britain
203
29
204
Claim for restitution
206
If captured property be in possession of a neutral
207
Purchasers in foreign ports
208
If condemned in captors country
209
CHAPTER XXV
211
Authority to institute sieges and blockades
212
Distinction between them
214
Actual presence of an adequate blockading force
215
Constructive or paper blockades
216
Ancient textwriters and treaties
217
Course of England and France in the wars of Napoleon
218
Their declarations in 1854 and 1856
219
If blockading vessels be driven away by superior force
220
CHAPTER XXVI
244
Modern treaties and ordinances
255
Conflicting decisions of prize courts
256
Implements and munitions of war
257
Unwrought articles
258
Of Lord Stowell and Sir R Phillimore
273
Distinction between pirates and slavers
276
Great Britain finally renounces her claim of right of visit O
277
Visitation and search in time of war
282
English views as to extent of this right
283
Views of American writers
284
Force may be used in the exercise of this right
285
But must be exercised in a lawful manner
286
Penalty for contravention of this right
287
English decision as to effect of convoy
288
Merchant ships under their convoy
289
Treaties respecting neutral convoy
290
Opinions of publicists
291
Neutral vessels under enemys convoy
293
Effect of resistance of master on cargo
295
Neutral property in armed enemy vessel
296
Documents requisite to prove neutral character
297
Concealment of papers
298
Use of false papers
299
Impressment of seamen from neutral vessels
300
American rule as defined by Webster
302
Violation of Neutral Duties
305
20
330
22
336
II
349
PARA PAGE 13 When and how revoked
353
Cartels for prisoners
354
Cartel ships
355
Their rights and duties
356
Ransom of captured property
358
If ransom vessel be lost or stranded
359
Hostages for captures and prisoners
360
Suits on contracts of ransom
361
CHAPTER XXX
364
Special licences
366
Want of uniformity in British decisions
367
Representations of the grantee
368
Persons entitled to use them
369
Where the principal acts as agent for others
370
Character of the vessel
371
Change of national character during voyage
372
Protection to enemys goods
373
Licence to alien enemy
374
If cargo be injured
375
Compulsory change of cargo
376
Change of port of destination
377
Time limited in licence
378
If not on board or not endorsed
379
Of captures generally
380
Collusive captures
401
30
406
Of owners of privateers
407
32
409
PARA PAGE 8 In the United States
417
The President cannot confer prize jurisdiction
421
Court may sit in the country of captor or his ally
422
In conquered territory
423
Extent of jurisdiction
424
Location of prize
426
Decision conclusive
428
Cases of England and Prussia in 1753 and the United States and Denmark in 1830
431
When jurisdiction may be inquired into
432
How far governed by municipal laws
433
Character of proceedings of proofs c
434
Custody of property
437
Conduct of suit by captors
438
Who may appear as claimants
440
Duties of claimants
441
Nature and form of decrees
442
CHAPTER XXXIII
444
Change of ownership of private property during military occupation
460
Laws relating to such transfers
461
Allegiance of inhabitants of occupied territory
462
Lawful resistance and insurrection
463
Implied obligation of the conquered
464
Right of revolution
465
Right of insurrection in war
466
Historical examples
468
Alienations of territory occupied by an enemy
469
CHAPTER XXXIV
480
VOL II
512
533
533
538
538
34
541
International Courts in Egypt
555
Territorial Waters of the British Empire
559
INDEX
567
2
588
35
598

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Populāri fragmenti

219. lappuse - The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war ; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4. Blockades, in order to be binding, must be effective ; that is to say, maintained by a force sufficient really to prevent access to the coast of the enemy.
16. lappuse - Privateering is and remains abolished; 2. The neutral flag covers enemy's goods, with the exception of contraband of war; 3. Neutral goods, with the exception of contraband of war, are not liable to capture under enemy's flag; 4.
492. lappuse - ... to the United States by this treaty shall be incorporated in the Union of the United States, as soon as may be consistent with the principles of the Federal Constitution, and admitted to the enjoyment of the privileges, rights, and immunities of the citizens of the United States.
185. lappuse - A neutral Government is bound — " First, to use due diligence to prevent the fitting out, arming, or equipping, within its jurisdiction, of any vessel which it has reasonable ground to believe is intended to cruise or to carry on war against a Power with which it is at peace...
186. lappuse - And whereas the privilege of exterritoriality accorded to vessels of war has been admitted into the law of nations, not as an absolute right, but solely as a proceeding founded on the principle of courtesy and mutual deference between different nations, and therefore can never be appealed to for the protection of acts done in violation of neutrality...
17. lappuse - And that the private property of the subjects or citizens of a belligerent on the high seas shall be exempted from seizure by public armed vessels of the other belligerent, except it be contraband.
540. lappuse - He shall be guilty of an offence against this Act, and shall be punishable by fine and imprisonment, or either of such punishments, at the discretion of the court before which the offender is convicted; and imprisonment, if awarded, may be either with or without hard labour.
349. lappuse - I propose to receive the surrender of the Army of Northern Virginia on the following terms, to wit : Rolls of all the officers and men to be made in duplicate, one copy to be given to an officer...
36. lappuse - As martial law is executed by military force, it is incumbent upon those who administer it to be strictly guided by the principles of justice, honor, and humanity — virtues adorning a soldier even more than other men, for the very reason that he possesses the power of his arms against the unarmed.
455. lappuse - Martial rule can never exist where the courts are open, and in the proper and unobstructed exercise of their jurisdiction. It is also confined to the locality of actual war.

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