Ideas of Good and Evil

Pirmais vāks
A. H. Bullen, 1903 - 341 lappuses

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LibraryThing Review

Lietotāja recenzija  - JudyCroome - LibraryThing

This book was not what I expected from the title, but neither was it less than I expected. Rather than a discussion on good and evil as conditions of the human soul, this was a collection of essays ... Lasīt pilnu pārskatu

Atlasītās lappuses

Saturs

I
1
II
16
III
29
IV
70
V
90
VI
142
VII
168
VIII
176
X
237
XI
257
XII
270
XIII
296
XIV
306
XV
308
XVI
312
XVII
333

IX
226
XVIII
339

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Populāri fragmenti

207. lappuse - To Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love, All pray in their distress, And to these virtues of delight Return their thankfulness. For Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love, Is God our Father dear; And Mercy, Pity, Peace, and Love, Is man, His child and care. For Mercy has a human heart; Pity, a human face; And Love, the human form divine: And Peace, the human dress.
161. lappuse - Tired with all these, for restful death I cry, As, to behold desert a beggar born, And needy nothing trimm'd in jollity, And purest faith unhappily forsworn, And gilded honour shamefully misplaced, And maiden virtue rudely strumpeted, And right perfection wrongfully disgraced, And strength by limping sway disabled, And art made tongue-tied by authority...
207. lappuse - For mercy, pity, peace, and love, Is God our Father dear ; And mercy, pity, peace, and love, Is man, His child and care. For Mercy has a human heart, Pity a human face ; And Love, the human form divine ; And Peace, the human dress.
99. lappuse - That thus enchains us to permitted ill. We might be otherwise, we might be all We dream of happy, high, majestical. Where is the love, beauty and truth we seek, But in our mind? and if we were not weak, Should we be less in deed than in desire?' 'Ay, if we were not weak — and we aspire How vainly to be strong!' said Maddalo; 'You talk Utopia.
103. lappuse - And death is a low mist which cannot blot The brightness it may veil. When lofty thought Lifts a young heart above its mortal lair, And love and life contend in it, for what Shall be its earthly doom, the dead live there And move like winds of light on dark and stormy air.
278. lappuse - I know a bank where the wild thyme blows, Where oxlips and the nodding violet grows ; Quite over-canopied with luscious woodbine, With sweet musk-roses, and with eglantine...
180. lappuse - Artist in fear and doubt of his own original conception. The spirit of Titian was particularly active in raising doubts concerning the possibility of executing without a model, and when once he had raised the doubt, it became easy for him to snatch away the vision time after time...
275. lappuse - So they took the blossoms of the oak, and the blossoms of the broom, and the blossoms of the meadow-sweet, and produced from them a maiden, the fairest and most graceful that man ever saw. And they baptized her, and gave her the name of Flower-Aspect.
277. lappuse - More yellow was her head than the flower of the broom ; and her skin was whiter than the foam of the wave ; and fairer were her hands and her fingers than the blossoms of the wood-anemone amidst the spray of the meadow fountain.
318. lappuse - The more a poet rids his verses of heterogeneous knowledge and irrelevant analysis, and purifies his mind with elaborate art, the more does the little ritual of his verse resemble the great ritual of Nature, and become mysterious and inscrutable.

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