Conference Series, 31. izdevums

Pirmais vāks
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1929
 

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9. lappuse - While carefully avoiding any political entanglements, my Government strives at all times to co-operate with other nations to every practical extent in support of peace objectives, including reduction or limitation of armaments, the control of traffic in arms, taking the profits out of war, and the restoration of fair and friendly economic relationships. We reject war as a method of settling international disputes and favour such methods as conference, conciliation, and arbitration.
11. lappuse - decent respect to the opinions of mankind", public opinion has controlled foreign policy in all democracies. It is, therefore, all-important that every platform, every pulpit, and every forum should become constant and active agencies in the great work of education and organization. The limited extent of such highly organized and intelligent public opinion in support of peace is by far the largest draw-back to any plan to prevent war. Truly the first step is that each nation must thus make itself...
34. lappuse - DECEMBER 23, 1936 Mr. President and Members of the Conference: Today this conference for the maintenance of peace holds its last session. Before it adjourns, let me review briefly the major events and actions. One point stands out boldly. No such conference could have had any measure of real success had it not been approached in the spirit with which each of the twenty-one delegations has approached this one — a spirit of good will and common determination to consolidate the pattern of peace. The...
35. lappuse - Conference, who has so ably presided over its sessions ; and to the zeal, intelligence, and patriotism with which the delegations have here joined one another in the actions taken. With clear vision and high purpose this illustrious body of men and women has cooperated nobly in the results we have reached. As one of your coworkers, I extend to each and every one of you my appreciation, admiration, and respect for your splendid achievements. I am content for others to judge the accomplishments of...
13. lappuse - The second is the Treaty for the Renunciation of War, known as the Kellogg-Briand Pact, or the Pact of Paris, signed at Paris in 1928. The third is the General Convention of Inter-American Conciliation, signed
21. lappuse - If peace and progress are to be either maintained or advanced, the time is overripe for renewed effort on each nation's part. There can be no delay. Through past centuries, the human race fought its way up from the low level of barbarism and war to that of civilization and peace. This accomplishment has only been partial, and it may well be but temporary. It would be a frightful commentary on the human race if, with the awful lesson of its disastrous experience, responsible and civilized governments...
17. lappuse - ... the rebuilding of trade. Each can grant new opportunities to others as it receives new opportunities for itself. All are called upon to share in the concurrent or concerted action which is required. Any country which seeks the benefits of the program while avoiding its responsibilities, will in time shut itself off from the benefits. Any country which is tempted or forced by some special calculation to depart from these lines of action and which conveys and seeks special advantage jeopardizes...
5. lappuse - Americas, through their chosen delegates, have assembled to make careful survey and analysis of all aspects of dieir responsibilities; to take account of their common duties; and to plan accordingly for the safety and welfare of their peoples. . . . There is no need for war. There is a practical alternative policy at hand, complete and adequate. It is no exclusive policy aimed at the safety or supremacy of...
19. lappuse - International agreements have lost their force and reliability as a basis of relations between nations. This extremely ominous and fateful development constitutes the most dangerous single phenomenon in the world of today; not international law merely, but that which is higher — moral law — and the whole integrity and honor of governments are in danger of being ruthlessly trampled upon. There has been a failure of the spirit. There is no task more urgent than that of remaking the basis of trusted...
12. lappuse - ... their needed knowledge into trenchant phrase and line; they have work to do. Our great journals on both continents cover the world. Our women are awake; our youth sentient; our clubs and organizations make opinion everywhere. There is a strength here available greater than that of armies. We have but to ask its aid; it will be swift to answer, not only here but in continents beyond the seas.

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