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UNITED STATES OF AMERICA

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This report makes available a listing of companies filing annual reports with the Securities and Exchange Commission. The listings are presented alphabetically and by industrial classification.

Coverage

The listings are as of July 1961 and cover 3,999 companies required to file annual reports under the Securities Exchange Act of 1934. . They include companies with securities listed on national securities exchanges and companies which have registered securities under the Securities Act of 1933. Excluded are the following groups:

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Investment companies registered under the Investment
Company Act of 1940.
Governments and political subdivisions thereof.
Registrants incorporated in a foreign country other
than a North American country or Cuba.
Banks and trust companies.
Issuers of voting trust certificates, and stockholders'
and bondholders' protective committees.

4.
5.

Industry Groupings

Fundamentally, the industry groups were based upon the classification as developed by the Office of Statistical Standards of the Bureau of the Budget, Executive Office of the President, and published in 1957 as the "Standard Industrial Classification Manual".

In order to present homogeneous groups within the limits of practicability and convenience, the 3 digit groups of the Standard Industrial Classification were utilized primarily. In certain cases the 2 or 4 digit categories were used and in many instances industry groups consisting of a combination of 3 digit groupings were established,

A list detailing the industry groups, comparable Standard Industrial Classification code numbers and the number of companies within each group is presented on pages IV through IX. Users desiring a broader classification of industry groups may refer to the 2 digit industry classification titles in the Standard Industrial Classification Manual.

Definition of Reporting Unit

The organization or unit classified consisted of the Company and all subsidiaries included in the consolidated financial statements submitted to the Securities and Exchange Commission.

Basis of Company Classification

In general each company was classified on the basis of its major activity which was determined by the product of group of products produced or handled, or services rendered. The major line of activity as reflected by the gross revenues of the company was, as far as possible, the principal objective criterion used in classifying the company.

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In certain industrial areas it was necessary to deviate from the above mentioned criterion and other measures of classification were used. Thus, for example, Industry Group 291 - Petroleum Refining - consists of all semi-integrated and integrated companies having petroleum refining facilities, and Industry Group 532 - Mail Order Houses - includes mail order companies having department and retail stores.

Limitations of Industry Grouping

The companies listed encompass most of the largest industrial enterprises in the United States. The classification of many of these companies in one specific industry group imparts limitations to the group. Thus in the industry listings as presented, many companies considered major economic enterprises in more than one industry group, are classified only in one category. The classification of many multi-product and multiindustry companies is based upon available information and the relative importance and significance of individual products or activities in the overall operations of the consolidated enterprise. As a result such classification to some extent is arbitrary.

Parent and Subsidiary Registrants

To the degree that information is known, subsidiary registrants (other than railroads) included in the consolidated reports of the parent registrant are noted in a separate tabulation.

III

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101 102 103 104 106 109

II. MINING (390) 101

Iron Ores (4) 102

Copper Ores (7) 103

Lead and Zinc Ores (13) 104

Gold and Silver Ores (16) 106

Ferroalloy Ores, except Vanadium (3) 109

Miscellaneous Metal Ores (14) 109X Metal Mining - Non-Producers (120) 111

Anthracite Mining (2) 121

Bituminous Coal Mining (12) 131

Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas (118) 138

Oil and Gas Field Services (24) 139

Crude Petroleum and Natural Gas - Non-Producers (44) 144

Sand, Gravel and Related Stone Products (3) 145

Clay, Ceramic, and Refractory Minerals (2) 147

Chemical and Fertilizer Mineral Mining (8) 149

Miscellaneous Nonmetallic Minerals, except Fuels (0)

111
121
131-132
138

141-142-144
145
147
149

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IV.

201 202 203

201
202

MANUFACTURING (1,911)
Meat Products (17)
Dairy Products (9)
Canning and Preserving Fruits, Vegetables, and Sea

Foods; and Miscellaneous Food Preparation and

Kindred Products (35)
Grain Mill Products (21)
Bakery Products (13)
Sugar (19)
Confectionery and Related Products (12)
Alcoholic and Malt Beverages (33)

204 205 206 207 208

203-209
204
205
206
207
2082-2083
2084-2085
2086-2087

208X

Non-alcoholic Beverages and Carbonated Waters (17)

NOTE:

The number of companies in each group is shown in parenthesis

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