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for, the owner, agent, or master of the vessel shall first notify such persons of the presence on board of any dangerous articles, as defined by law, or of any other condition or circumstance which would constitute a risk of safety for passenger or crew.

The privilege bestowed by this section on vessels of the United States shall be extended insofar as the foreign trade is concerned to the cargo vessels of any nation which allows the like privilege to cargo vessels of the United States in trades not restricted to vessels under its own flag.

Failure on the part of the owner, agent, or master of the vessel to give such notice shall subject the vessel to a penalty of $500, which may be mitigated or remitted by the Commandant of the Coast Guard upon a proper representation of the facts. Count or list of passengers 46 U.S.C. 460 (R.S. 4467)

The master of every passenger steamer shall keep a correct count of all the passengers received and delivered from day to day, which count shall be open to the inspection of the Coast Guard and officers of the customs at all times, and the aggregate number of passengers shall be furnished to the Coast Guard as often as called for: Provided, however, That a correct list of passengers received and delivered from day to day shall be kept, instead of a correct count, by the masters of seagoing passenger steamers in the coastwise trade and by the masters of passenger steamers on the Great Lakes on routes exceeding three hundred miles: Provided further, That nothing herein shall affect existing laws relative to vessels running between this country and foreign ports. Count or list of passengers; exemption of certain vessels 46 U.S.C. 460a

Notwithstanding any provision of law to the contrary, no collector of customs shall require the master or owner of a vessel arriving, otherwise than by sea, at a port or place in the United States on the Great Lakes, or their connecting or tributary waters, from a port or place in the Dominion of Canada to furnish a list of passengers on board such vessel. Penalty for failure to keep list of passengers 46 U.S.C. 461 (R.S. 4468)

Every master of any passenger steamer who fails, through negligence or design, to keep a count or list of passengers as required by section 460 of this title shall be liable to a penalty of $100. Recovery of penalties 46 U.S.C. 462 (R.S. 4469)

The penalties imposed by sections 452 and 461 of this title shall be a lien upon the vessel in each case; but a bond may, as provided in other cases, be given to secure the satisfaction of the judgment.

Special permit for excursions 46 U.S.C. 453 (R.S. 4466)

If any passenger vessel engages in excursions, the Coast Guard officials shall issue to such vessel a special permit, in writing, for the occasion, in which shall be stated the additional number of passengers that may be carried and the number and kind of lifesaving appliances that shall be provided for the safety of such additional passengers; and they shall also, in their discretion, limit the route and distance for such excursions: Provided, however, That the issuance of such special permit shall be reported by the Coast Guard officials to the Commandant of the Coast Guard, and such special permit shall not be effective until approved by the said Commandant of the Coast Guard. Vessels on Great Lakes carrying persons not passengers 46 U.S.C. 458

Any steam vessel engaged in the business of towing vessels, rafts, or water craft of any kind, also steam vessels engaged in oyster dredging and planting, and fishing steamers engaged in food fishing on the Great Lakes and all other inland waters of the United States, and not carrying passengers, may be authorized and licensed by the Coast Guard to carry on board such number of persons, in addition to its crew, as the Coast Guard, in its judgment, shall deem necessary to carry on the legitimate business of such towing, oyster and fishing steamers, not exceeding, however, one person to every net ton of measurement of said steamer: Provided, however, That the person so allowed to be carried shall not be carried for hire. Life preservers 46 U.S.C. 459

Every steam vessel licensed under section 458 of this title shall carry and have on board, in accessible places, one life preserver for every person allowed to be carried, in addition to those provided for the crew of such vessel. Accommodations for steerage passengers in vessels from foreign

ports 46 U.S.C. 151

It shall not be lawful for the master of any vessel whereon steerage passengers have been taken at any port or place in the foreign country or dominion (ports and places in foreign territory contiguous to the United States excepted) to bring such vessel and passengers to or take from any port or place in the United States unless the compartments, spaces, and accommodations hereinafter mentioned have been provided, allotted, maintained, and used for and by such passengers during the entire voyage, unobstructed by cargo, stores, or goods. The master of a vessel coming to a port or place in the United States in violation of any of the provisions of this section shall be deemed guilty of a misdemeanor; and if the number of steerage passengers carried or brought in the vessel, or in any compartment, space, poop, or deck house thereof, is greater than the number allowed to be carried or brought therein, respectively, as hereinafter prescribed, the said master shall be fined $50 for each and every such passenger in excess of the proper number, and may also be imprisoned not exceeding six months.

In computing the number of passengers carried or brought in any vessel, children under one year of age shall not be included, and two children between one and eight years of age shall be counted as one passenger; and any person brought in such vessel who shall have been, during the voyage, taken from any other vessel wrecked or in distress on the high seas, or have been picked up at sea from any boat, raft, or otherwise, shall not be included in such computation.

Second. The expression "steerage passenger” means all passengers except cabin passengers, and persons shall not be deemed cabin passengers unless the space allotted to their exclusive use is in the proportion of at least thirty-six clear superficial feet to each passenger.

Third. The expression "lowest passenger deck” means the deck next below the water line; and the expression “passenger deck” includes every deck or portion of a deck which is above the lowest passenger deck, and is appropriated for passengers.

Fourth. A vessel shall not carry passengers, whether cabin or steerage passengers, on more than one deck below the water line.

Fifth. The height between that part of any deck on which steerage passengers are carried and the deck immediately above it shall not be less than six feet.

Sixth. No steerage passengers shall be carried on the lowest passenger deck unless it is efficiently lighted by side scuttles and otherwise to the satisfaction of the inspector.

Seventh. No greater number of steerage passengers shall be carried on the lowest passenger deck than in the proportion of one steerage passenger to every twenty-one clear superficial feet allotted to their use. If, however, the height between the lowest passenger deck and the deck immediately above it is less than seven feet, and the apertures, exclusive of side scuttles, through which light and air are admitted are less in size than in the proportion of three square feet to every one hundred superficial feet of that deck, no greater number of steerage passengers shall be carried on that deck than in the proportion of one steerage passenger to every thirty clear superficial feet thereof, subject to the allowance for measurement of public rooms, lavatories, and bath rooms, if any, provided for by paragraph ten.

Eighth. No greater number of steerage passengers may be carried on a passenger deck than in the proportion of one steerage passenger to every eighteen clear superficial feet of deck allotted to their use, subject to the allowance for measurement of public rooms, lavatories, and bath rooms, if any, provided for by paragraph ten. If, however, the height between any passenger deck and the deck immediately above it be less than seven feet, no greater number of steerage passengers may be carried on that deck than in the proportion of one steerage passenger to every twenty-one clear superficial feet thereof, subject to the allowance for measurement of public rooms, lavatories, and bath rooms, if any provided for by paragraph ten.

Ninth. A vessel, whatever be the superficial space of the passenger decks and of the lowest passenger deck, shall not carry a greater

number of steerage passengers on the whole than in the proportion of one steerage passenger to every five superficial feet of air or promenade space provided on a deck so open as not to be included in the tonnage and approved by the inspector, and this space shall not be counted or included in the area available for any other passengers, or in other areas for steerage passengers prescribed by this section.

Tenth. In the measurement of the passenger decks and of the lowest passenger deck, the space occupied by that part of the personal baggage of the steerage passengers which the inspector permits to be carried there shall be included, and also, on whatever deck located, commodious and suitable dining rooms, lounging rooms, smoking rooms, lavatories, toilet rooms, and bath rooms: Provided. That

(a) The space in any place appropriated to the use of steerage passengers in which they sleep shall not be less than eighteen superficial feet in the case of the lowest passenger deck and fifteen superficial feet in the case of a passenger deck.

(b) Each space so included in the measurement must be clearly marked to the satisfaction of the inspector as being exclusively appropriated for the use of the steerage passengers.

Eleventh. Each separate compartment in which steerage passengers are berthed shall be conspicuously marked, showing the total area of such compartments. Berths for passengers 46 U.S.C. 152

In every such steamship or other vessel there shall be a sufficient number of berths for the proper accommodation as hereinafter provided, of all such passengers. There shall not be on any deck nor in any compartment or space occupied by such passengers more than two tiers of berths. The berths shall be properly constructed, and be separated from each other by partitions, as berths ordinarily are separated, and each berth shall be at least two feet in width and six feet in length; and the interval between the floor or lowest part of the lower tier of berths and the deck beneath them shall not be less than six inches, nor the interval between each tier of berths, and the interval between the uppermost tier and the deck above it less than two feet, six inches; and each berth shall be occupied by not more than one passenger over eight years of age; but double berths of twice the above-mentioned width may be provided, each double berth to be occupied by no more and by none other than two women, or by one woman and two children under the age of eight years, or by husband and wife, or by a man and two of his own children under the age of eight years, or by two men personally acquainted with each other. All the male passengers upwards of fourteen years of age who do not occupy berths with their wives shall be berthed in the fore part of the vessel, in a compartment divided off from the space or spaces appropriated to the other passengers by a substantial and well-secured bulkhead. Unmarried female passengers shall be berthed in a compartment separated from the spaces occupied by other passengers by a substantial and wellconstructed bulkhead, the opening or communication from which to an adjoining passenger space shall be so constructed that it can be closed and secured. Families shall not be separated except with their consent. Each berth shall be numbered serially, on the outside berth board, according to the number of passengers that may lawfully occupy the berth; and the berths occupied by such passengers shall not be removed or taken down until the expiration of twelve hours from the time of entry, unless previously inspected within a shorter period. For any violation of either of the provisions of this section the master of the vessel shall be liable to a fine of $5 for each passenger carried or brought on the vessel. Light, air, and accommodations, passengers 46 U.S.C. 153

Every such steamship or other vessel shall have adequate provisions for affording light and air to the passenger decks and to the compartments and spaces occupied by such passengers, and with

, adequate means and appliances for ventilating the said compartments and spaces. To compartments having sufficient space for fifty or more of such passengers at least two ventilators, each not less than twelve inches in diameter, shall be provided, one of which ventilators shall be inserted in the forward part of the compartment and the other in the after part thereof, and shall be so constructed as to ventilate the compartment; and additional ventilators shall be provided for each compartment in the proportion of two ventilators for each additional fifty of such passengers carried or brought in the compartment. All ventilators shall be carried at least six feet above the uppermost deck of the vessel and shall be of the most approved form and construction. In any steamship the ventilating apparatus provided, or any method of ventilation adopted thereon, which has been approved by the proper emigration officers at the port or place from which said vessel was cleared, shall be deemed a compliance with the foregoing provisions; and in all vessels carrying or bringing such passengers there shall be properly constructed hatchways over the compartments or spaces occupied by such passengers, which hatchway shall be properly covered with houses or booby hatches, and the combings or sills of which shall rise at least six inches above the deck; and there shall be proper companionways or ladders from each hatchway leading to the compartments or spaces occupied by such passengers; and the said companionways or ladders shall be securely constructed, and be provided with handrails or strong rope, and, when the weather will permit, such passengers shall have the use of each hatchway situated over the compartments or spaces appropriated to their use; and every vessel carrying or bringing such passengers shall have a properly located and constructed caboose and cooking range, or other cooking apparatus, the dimensions and capacity of which shall be sufficient to provide for properly cooking and preparing the food of all such passengers. In every vessel carrying or bringing such passengers there shall be at least two water closets or privies and an additional water closet or privy for every one hundred male passengers on board, for the exclusive use of such male passengers, and an additional water closet or privy for every fifty female passengers on board, for the exclusive use of

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