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Report of inspectors
46 U.S.C. 657 (R.S. 4560)

The inspectors appointed by any consul, in pursuance of the preceding section, shall have full power to examine the vessel and whatever is aboard of her, so far as is pertinent to their inquiry, and also to hear and receive any other proofs which the ends of justice may require; and if, upon a view of the whole proceedings, the consul is satisfied therewith, he may approve the whole or any part of the report, and shall certify such approval; or if he dissents, he shall certify his reasons for dissenting. Discharge of crew on account of unseaworthiness; penalty for

sending unseaworthy vessel to sea 46 U.S.C. 658 (R.S. 4561)

The inspectors in their report shall also state whether in their opinion the vessel was sent to sea unsuitably provided in any important or essential particular, by neglect or design, or through mistake or accident; and in case it was by neglect or design, and the consular officer approves of such finding, he shall discharge such of the crew as request it, and shall require the payment by the master of one month's wages for each seaman over and above the wages then due, or sufficient money for the return of such of the crew as desire to be discharged to the nearest and most convenient port of the United States, or by furnishing the seamen who so desire to be discharged with employment on a ship agreed to by them. But if in the opinion of the inspectors the defects or deficiencies found to exist have been the result of mistake or accident, and could not in the exercise of ordinary care, have been known and provided against before the sailing of the vessel, and the master shall in a reasonable time remove or remedy the causes of complaint, then the crew shall remain and discharge their duty. This section does not apply to fishing or whaling vessels or yachts. Payment of charges for inspection 46 U.S.C. 659 (R.S. 4562)

The master shall pay all such reasonable charges for inspection under such complaint as shall be officially certified to him under the hand of the consul; but in case the inspectors report that the complaint is without any good and sufficient cause the master may retain from the wages of the complainants, in proportion to the pay of each, the amount of such charges, with such reasonable damages for detention on that account as the consul directing the inquiry may officially certify. Refusal to pay wages and charges 46 U.S.C. 660 (R.S. 4563)

Every master who refuses to pay such wages and charges shall be liable to each person injured thereby, in damages, to be recovered in any court of the United States in the district where such delinquent may reside or be found, and in addition thereto be punishable by a fine of $100 for each offense.

Neglect to provide sufficient stores 46 U.S.C. 661 (R.S. 4564)

Should any master or owner of any merchant vessel of the United States neglect to provide a sufficient quantity of stores to last for a voyage of ordinary duration to the port of destination, and in consequence of such neglect the crew are compelled to accept a reduced scale, such master or owner shall be liable to a penalty as provided in section 665 of this title. Complaint as to provisions or water; examination 46 U.S.C. 662 (R.S. 4565)

Any three or more of the crew of any merchant vessel of the United States bound from a port in the United States to any foreign port, or being of the burden of seventy-five tons or upward, and bound from a port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific, or vice versa, may complain to any officer in command of any of the vessels of the United States Navy, or consular officer of the United States, or Coast Guard official to whom the duties of shipping commissioner have been delegated, or chief officer of the customs, that the provisions or water for the use of the crew are, at any time, of bad quality, unfit for use, or deficient in quantity. Such officer shall thereupon examine the provisions or water, or cause them to be examined; and if, on examination, such provisions or water are found to be of bad quality and unfit for use, or to be deficient in quantity, the person making such examination shall certify the same in writing to the master of the ship. If such master does not thereupon provide other proper provisions or water, where the same can be had, in lieu of any so certified to be of a bad quality and unfit for use, or does not procure the requisite quantity of any so certified to be insufficient in quantity, or uses any provisions or water which have been so certified as aforesaid to be of bad quality and unfit for use, he shall, in every such case, be liable to a penalty of not more than one hundred dollars; and upon every such examination the officers making or directing the same shall enter a statement of the result of the examination in the log book, and shall send a report thereof to the district judge for the judicial district embracing the port to which such vessel is bound; and such report shall be received in evidence in any legal proceedings. Forfeiture for false complaint as to provisions or water 46 U.S.C. 663 (R.S. 4566)

If the officer to whom any such complaint in regard to the provisions or the water is made certifies in such statement that there was no reasonable ground for such complaint, each of the parties so complaining shall forfeit to the master or owner his share of the expense, if any, of the survey. This section shall not apply to fishing or whaling vessels or yachts.

Permission from master to enter complaint as to provisions or

water 46 U.S.C. 664 (R.S. 4567)

If any seamen, while on board any vessel, shall state to the master that they desire to make complaint, in accordance with sections 662 and 663 of this title in regard to the provisions or the water, to a competent officer, against the master, the master shall, if the vessel is then at a place where there is any such officer, so soon as the service of the vessel will permit, and if the vessel is not then at such a place, so soon after her first arrival at such place as the service of the vessel will permit, allow such seamen, or any of them, to go ashore, or shall send them ashore, in proper custody, so that they may be enabled to make such complaint; and shall, in default, be liable to a penalty of not more than $100. Allowance for reduction of provisions 46 U.S.C. 665 (R.S. 4568)

If, during a voyage, the allowance of any of the provisions which any seaman is entitled to under section 713 of this title is reduced except for any time during which such seaman willfully and without sufficient cause refuses or neglects to perform his duty, or is lawfully under confinement for misconduct either on board or on shore; or if it shall be shown that any of such provisions are, or have been during the voyage bad in quality or unfit for use, the seaman shall receive, by way of compensation for such reduction or bad quality, according to the time of its continuance, the following sums, to be paid to him in addition to and to be recoverable as wages:

First. If his allowance is reduced by any quantity not exceeding one-third of the quantity specified by law, a sum not exceeding 50 cents a day.

Second. If his allowance is reduced by any more than one-third of such quantity, a sum not exceeding $i a day.

Third. In respect of bad quality, a sum not exceeding $1 a day. But if it is shown to the satisfaction of the court before which the case is tried that any provisions, the allowance of which has been reduced, could not be procured or supplied in sufficient quantities, or were unavoidably injured or lost, or if by reason of its innate qualities any article becomes unfit for use and that proper and equivalent substitutes were supplied in lieu thereof, the court shall take such circumstances into consideration and shall modify or refuse compensation, as the justice of the case may require. This section shall not apply to fishing or whaling vessels or yachts. Weights and measures 46 U.S.C. 668 (R.S. 4571)

Every master shall keep on board proper weights and measures for the purpose of determining the quantities of the several provisions and articles served out, and shall allow the same to be used at the time of serving out such provisions and articles, in the pres

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ence of a witness, whenever any dispute arises about such quantities, and in default shall, for every offense, be liable to a penalty of not more than $50. Medicines 46 U.S.C. 666 (R.S. 4569)

Every vessel belonging to a citizen of the United States, bound from a port in the United States to any foreign port, or being of the burden of seventy-five tons or upward, and bound' from a port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific, or vice versa, shall be provided with a chest of medicines; and every sailing vessel bound on a voyage across the Atlantic or Pacific Ocean, or around Cape Horn, or the Cape of Good Hope, or engaged in the whale or other fisheries, or in sealing, shall also be provided with, and cause to be kept, a sufficient quantity of lime or lemon juice, and also sugar and vinegar, or other antiscorbutics, to be served out to every seaman as follows: The master of every such vessel shall serve the lime or lemon juice, and sugar and vinegar, to the crew, within ten days after salt provisions mainly have been served out to the crew, and so long afterward as such consumption of salt provisions continues; the lime or lemon juice and sugar daily at the rate of half an ounce each per day; and the vinegar weekly at the rate of half a pint per week for each member of the crew. Penalty for failure to keep medicines 46 U.S.C. 667 (R.S. 4570)

If, on any such vessel, such medicines, medical stores, lime or lemon juice, or other articles, sugar, and vinegar, as are required by section 666 of this title are not provided and kept on board, as required, the master or owner shall be liable to a penalty of not more than $500; and if the master of any such vessel neglects to serve out the lime or lemon juice, and sugar and vinegar in the case and manner directed, he shall for each offense be liable to a penalty of not more than $100; and if any master is convicted in either of the offenses mentioned in this section, and it appears that the offense is owing to the act or default of the owner, such master may recover the amount of such penalty, and the costs incurred by him, from the

owner.

Slop chest
46 U.S.C. 670, 671

Every vessel mentioned in section 666 of this title shall also be provided with a slop chest, which shall contain a complement of clothing for the intended voyage for each seaman employed, including boots or shoes, hats or caps, under clothing and outer clothing, oiled clothing, and everything necessary for the wear of a seaman; also a full supply of tobacco and blankets. Any of the contents of the slop chest shall be sold, from time to time, to any or every seaman applying therefor, for his own use, at a profit not exceeding 10 per centum of the reasonable wholesale value of the same at the port. at which the voyage commenced. And if any such ressel is not provided, before sailing, as herein required, the owner shall be liable to a penalty of not more than $500. The provisions of this section shall not apply to vessels plying between the United States and the Dominion of Canada, Newfoundland, the Bermuda Islands, the Bahama Islands, the West Indies, Mexico, and Central America. [This section shall not be construed to apply to vessels engaged in the whaling and fishing business.] Clothing and heat 46 U.S.C. 669 (R.S. 4572)

Every vessel bound on any foreign voyage exceeding in length fourteen days shall also be provided with at least one suit of woolen clothing for each seaman, and every vessel in the foreign or domestic trade shall provide a safe and warm room for the use of seamen in cold weather. Failure to make such provision shall subject the owner or master to a penalty of not less than $100. This section shall not apply to fishing or whaling vessels or yachts. Log book; entries 46 U.S.C. 201 (R.S. 4290)

Every vessel making voyages from a port in the United States to any foreign port, or being of the burden of seventy-five tons, or upward, from a port on the Atlantic to a port on the Pacific, or vice versa, shall have an official log book; and every master of such vessel shall make, or cause to be made therein, entries of the following matters, that is to say:

First. Every legal conviction of any member of his crew, and the punishment inflicted.

Second. Every offense committed by any member of his crew for which it is intended to prosecute, or to enforce a forfeiture, together with such statement concerning the reading over such entry, and concerning the reply, if any, made to the charge, as is required by the provisions of section 702 of this title.

Third. Every offense for which punishment is inflicted on board, and the punishment inflicted.

Fourth. A statement of the conduct, character, and qualifications of each of his crew; or a statement that he declines to give an opinion of such particulars.

Fifth. Every case of illness or injury happening to any member of the crew, with the nature thereof, and the medical treatment.

Sixth. Every case of death happening on board, with the cause thereof.

Seventh. Every birth happening on board, with the sex of the infant, and the names of the parents.

Eighth. Every marriage taking place on board, with the names and ages of the parties.

Ninth. The name of every seaman or apprentice who ceases to be a member of the crew otherwise than by death, with the place, time, manner, and the cause thereof.

Tenth. The wages due to any seaman or apprentice who dies during the voyage, and the gross amount of all deductions to be made therefrom.

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