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XVI. THEOLOGICAL SEMINARIES.

Com. No. Stud. Vols.
Place. Denomina- oper- edu in in

tion.
at on catea, 1831.

Lib.

Name.

No.Prof,

Bangor 'l'heol. Sem. Bangor, Me., Cong.

1816 50

14 1,200 Theol. Seminary, Andover, Mass. Cong. 1808 514 13910,000 Theological School, Cambridge, do. Con. Unit. 1824 87 33 Mass. Epis. Th. Sch. Do. do. Episcopal, 1831 Theol. Instit. Newton, do. Baptist, 1825 25 22 1,020 2 Theol. Dep. Yale Col. New Haven, Ct. Cong. 1822 70 48 Theol. Ins. Epis. Ch. New York,N.Y. Prot. Epis. 1819 134 28 3,600 4 Th. Sem. of Auburn, Auburn, do. Presbyt. 1821 157 51 4,000 3 Hamilton Lit.&Th.In. Hamilton, do, Baptist, 1820 100 80 1,600 4 Hartwick Seminary, Hartwick, do. Lutheran, 1816 Th. Sem. Du. Ref.Ch. N.Br’wick.N.J. Dutch Re.

24 Th. Sem. Pr. Ch. U S. Princeton, do. Presbyt. 1812 537 111 6,000 3 Sem. Luth. Ch. U. S. Gettysburg, Pa. Evang. L. 1826 43 6,2002 German Reformed, York, do. G.Ref.Ch. 1825 11 14

2 West. Th. Seminary, Alleg'ny,T. do. Presbyt. 1828 22 3,964 2 Epis. Th. School Va. Fairfax Co. Va. Prot. Epis.

19 1,500 3 Union Th. Seminary, Pr. Ed. Co. do. Presbyt. 1824 30 423,000 3 South Th. Seminary, Columbia, S.C. Do. 1829

91

2 South West. Th. Sem. Maryville, Ten. Do. 1821 41 22 5,500 3 Lane Seininary, Cincinnati, Oo. Do. 1829 Rock Spring Sem., Rock Spring, 11. Baptist, 1827

5 1,200 11 There are Roman Catholic Theological Seminaries at Baltimore and near Emmittsburg, Md., at Charleston, S. C., at Bardstown, and in Washington County, Ky., in Perry County, and St. Louis, Mo., and at Cincinnati, Ohio.

XVII. MEDICAL SCHOOLS.
Name.

Place. Lectures com. Prof. Stud.

Maine Medical School, Brunswick, February,

4 99 Waterville Medical School, Waterville,

1st, Th., March, 28 N. Hampshire Med. School, Hanover, 2 weeks aft.Com. 3 98 Vermont Med. School, Univ.Vt. Burlington,

2d Wed. Sept.,

3 40 Vt. Academy of Medicine, Castleton,

30 Thurs.in Aug. 62 Mass. Med. School, Harv. Univ. Boston, 3d Wed., Oct., 95 Berkshire Med. Inst,Wms. Col. Pittsfield, Ist Thùrs., Sept., 85 Medical School, Yale College, New Haven, last week in Oct., 569 Coll. Phys. & Surgeons, N. Y., New York, 1st Mond., Nov., 7 180 Col. Phys. & Surg., West. Dist., Fairfield,

5 170 Med. Dep.Jef.Col., Canonsburg, Philadelphia, 1st Mond., Nov.,

5 121 Medical Dep. Univ. Penn. Philadelphia,

9 410 Med. Dep. Univ. Md. Baltimore, last Mond., Oct.,

7 Med. Dep. Columbian College, Dist. Col. ist Mond., Nov, 7 Medical Dep. Univ. Va., Charlott'sville September,

3 Medical Col., Charleston, S C., Charleston, 2d Mond., Nov., 7 $150 Medical Col. Trans. Univ. Lexington,

211 Medical College of Ohio, Cincinnati, Ist Mond., Nov.

8 113

XVIII. LAW SCHOOLS. At Cambridge, Mass., 2 professors and 41 students; at New Haven, Ct., 2 professors and 44 students; at Litchfield, Ct.; at Philadelphia, Pa.; at Baltimore, Md., 22 students; at Williamsburg and Staunton, Va.; and at Lexington, Ken. 24 students.

[From the " Annals of Education.”]
XIX. TABULAR VIEW OF EDUCATION

IN THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE. The nuinber of Academical Students in the United States is here esti. wiated at 3,475; Theological Students, 663; Legal, 88 ; Medical, not far from 2,000. They belong to the several States as here apportioned. For want of data, however, the Medical and Legal Students were divided among the various States according to their respective population. American States.

European Countries.
No. of Proportion

No. of Proportion
Stud.
to Inhab.

Stud. to Inhab. Scotland,

3,249 1 683 Massachusetts, 770 1

792
Baden,

1,399 1

816 Connecticut, 327 1 960

Saxony,

1,360 1 / 1,010 New Hampshire, 241 1 1,118 England,

10,549 1

1,132 Hanover,

1,203 1 1,303 Bavaria,

",593 1 1,312 Tuscany,

909 11,402 Spain,

9,867) 1 1,414 Prussia,

6,236 1 1,470 Vermont,

186 1 | 1,509 Maine,

238 1

1,611 New Jersey,

193 1 | 1,661
Wurtemberg,

887 1 / 1,731 South Carolina, 325 1 1,789 Sweden and Norway, 2,687 1 | 1,732

Portugal,

1,604 1 1,879 Pennsylvania, 688 1 1,928 New York,

986 1 1,940 Rhode Island,

50 1 1,944
Netherlands,

2,998 1 1,979| Maryland, 175 12,554 || Sardinia,

1,722 1 2,420 Virginia,

457| 1 2,650 Kentucky, 219 1 2,766 Switzerland,

767 12,655 Georgia,

173 1 2,985 Mississippi, 45 1 3,040 North Carolina,

233 1 3,170 Tennessee, 211 1 3,245 Ohio,

295

1 3,290 Louisiana,

46 1 3,335 Delaware,

23 1 3,336
Denmark,

57811 3,342 Alabama, 84 1 | 3,634 Naples and Sicily, 2,065 1 1 3,5901

Austria,

8,584 13,760 Missouri,

28 1 5,003 Indiana, 65 5,101 France,

6,196 1 5,1401 Illinois,

28 15,624
Ireland,

1,254 1 / 5,767 (Russia,

3,626) 1 (15,455 Sections of the United States.

European Countries. Eastern States, 11,7481 1 / 1,118 England,

(10,549 1 ) 1,132 Middle States, 1,995 1 1,844 Portugal,

1,604 1 1,899 Southern States, 1,485 12,612 Switzerland,

767) 12,655 Western States, 957) 1 (3,516 Naples and Sicily, 2,065 1 3,590 United States, 16,1851 1 | 2,078 || Western Europe, 169,634 1 | 2,285

In reviewing this Table, we shall perceive, that in accordance with an opinion often expressed, Scotland gives more of her youth a collegiate education than any other country in the world. Baden, Massachusetts, and Connecticut, fall little short of this standard ; and these are the only countries in the world, according to these estimates, which have one collegiate pupil for less than 1,000 inhabitants. New Hampshire, according to the calculation of the American Quarterly Register, is the only American State besides, in which there is more than one for 1,500 ; while in Europe, Saxony, England, Hanover, Bavaria, Tuscany, Spain, and Russia, all have a proportion greater than this. It must not be forgotten, however, that the Universities and Colleges of Spain furnish nothing which deserves to be called a truly liberal education. Vermont, Maine, New Jersey, South Carolina, Pennsylvania, New York, and Rhode Island, comprising the rest of the Eastern and three of the Middle States and one of the Southern, have one student for less than 2,000 inhabitants, in which they are rivalled by Wurtemberg, Sweden, Portugal, and the Netherlands. Most of the Southern and Western States have from 2,000 to 4,000 inhabitants to a student. In this proportion, the highest compare with Switzerland, and the rest with Denmark, Naples, and Austria. The most recent Western States have only one to every 5,000 inhabitants; and still are placed on a level with France and Ireland. Russia, stands alone among the civilized countries of the world, and only gives a liberal education to one person in 15,000 of her population.

As a mass, it would appear that the Eastern States provide the advantages of a collegiate education, such as they are in the United States, for a greater proportion of their population than England, or any European countries except Scotland, Baden, and Saxony. The Middle States are as well provided as Wurtemberg, Sweden and the Netherlands. The Southern States will compare with Switzerland in this respect; and the Western States, with all their destitution, are as well supplied with liberally educated men, so far as numbers are concerned, as Denmark and Austria.

The comparative state of Common School Instruction is very different from that of Collegiate Instruction. In this, the United States have the preëminence, whether we compare them with the mass of European countries, or select individual examples. The Edinburgh Review admitted many years since, that “ The great body of the American people is better educated than the mass of any European community." The following table derived from the best sources, shows the proportion of children who receive Common School Instruction to the whole population, in several European countries, and in several of the United States, and furnishes statistical evidence of the truth of this remark. Proportion of Pupils in Common Schools to the whole Population. Pupil. Inhab.

Pupil. Inhab. Wurtemberg,

1 to
6 New York,

1 to 3.9 Canton Vaud, Switzerland, i to 6.6

1 to

7

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.

Bavaria,

1 to 7 Massachusetts, Maine, Prussia,

Connecticut, esti . 1 to 4 Netherlands,

1 to

9.7 mated Scotland,

1 to 10 Austria, 1 to 13 All New England, at?

at } 1 to 5 England,

1 to 15.3 at least France,

1 to 17.6. Ireland,

1 to 18 Pennsylvania, New Jersey, 1 to 8 Portugal, 1 to 88 Hlinois,

1 to 13 Russia, 1 to 367 Kentucky,

1 to 21 NOTE.The preceding table and remarks are printed, without alteration, from the Annals of Education; but it may be remarked, that from the want of information, and from the difficulty of digesting such information as may be had, on any common principles, no accurate comparative view of the state of education in the different countries above enumerated, can be presented. But a small part of the law students in the United States pursue the study of their profession in the public law schools ; and the number above giden (88) comprises only a part of those who belong to the law schools. In England, for example, many receive a good classical and

pro. fessional education who never become members of a university; and of the numbers inserted as belonging to the universities, the greater part are not students. In 1832, the number of members on the books in the University of Oxford, in England, was 2,741 ; and in that of Cambridge 5,364; but the number of undergraduates in the former was only 1,419, and in the latter, about 1,700.

XX. RELIGIOUS DENOMINATIONS.

Denominations.

Calvinistic Baptisis,
Methodist Episcopal Church,
Presbyterian, General Assembly,
Congregationalists, Orthodox,
Protestant Episcopal Church,
Universalists,
Roman Catholics, .
Lutherans,
Christians,
German Reformed,
Friends, or Quakers,
Unitarians, Congregationalists,
Associate and other Methodists,
Free-will Baptists,
Dutch Reformed,
Mennonites,
Associate Presbyterians,
Cumberland Presbyterians,
Tunkers,
Free Communion Baptists,
Seventh-day Baptists,
Six-Principle Baptists,
United Brethren or Moravians,
Millennial Church, or Shakers,
New Jerusalem Church,
Emancipators, Baptists,
Jews and others not mentioned,

Ch. or Commu- Population.
Min.
Cong. nicants.

Estimate.
(2,914 4,384 304,827 2,743,453
1,777 476,000 2,600,000
11,801 2,253 182,01 (1,800,000
1,000 1,381|140,000 1,260,000
558 922

600,000 150 300

500,000 | 784

800,000 205 1,200 44,000 400,000 200 800 25,000 275,000 84 400 17,400 200,000 462

200,000 160 193

176,000 350 35,000 175,000 300 400 16,000 150,000 159 602 17,888 125,000 200 30,000 120,000

74 144 15,000 100,000 50' 75

8,000 100,000 40

3,000 30,000 30

3,500 30,000 30 10

2,000 20,000 25 30

1,800 20,000 23 23 2,000

7,000 15

6,000 30 28

5,000 15

600 4,500 159

50,000

40

45

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Dioceses.

Bishops. Boston,

?

, New York, State of New York and a part New Jersey,

J. Dubois, D.D. Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, a part of New H. Crowell, D. D.

Jersey and Delaware, T. P. Kenrick, D. D. Coad. Baltimore, Maryland, Virginia, and Dis

James Whitefield, D. D. Abp. trict of Columbia, Charleston, N. Carolina, S. Carolina, and

J. England, D. D.
Georgia,
Mobile, Florida and Alabama,

Michael Portier, D. D.
New Orleans, Louisiana and Mississippi, De Neckere, D. D.

J. B. Flaget, D. D. Bardstown, Kentucky and Tennessee,

J. Davide, D. D. Coad. Cincinnati, Ohio, Indiana, and Michigan, E. Fenwick, D. D. St. Louis, Missouri & adjoining Territories, Joseph Rosati, D. D.

The number of ministers in each Diocese is not accurately known: in the Boston Diocese there are 16; and the number of congregations is 23.

The Catholic population of Boston is estimated at 10,000; of New England, 20,000 ; of the United States, 800,000. Of the Catholio congregations in New England, 6 are in Maine; 2 in New Hampshire ; 1 in Vermont; 9 in Massachusetts; 3 in Rhode Island ; 2 in Connecticut.

BISHOPS OF THE METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH.

William McKendree, R. H. Roberts, Joshua Soule, and Elijah Hedding.

14

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